12 1 - 20 of 25
rss atomLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
  • Dorner, Michael
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Capraro, Maximilian
    Kolabri, Germany.
    Treidler, Oliver
    Kolabri, Germany.
    Kunz, Tom-Eric
    Kolabri, Germany.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Zabardast, Ehsan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Mendez, Daniel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Taxing Collaborative Software Engineering: The Challenges for Tax Compliance in Software Engineering2024In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The engineering of complex software systems is often the result of a highly collaborative effort. However, collaboration within a multinational enterprise has an overlooked legal implication when developers collaborate across national borders: It is taxable. In this article, we discuss the unsolved problem of taxing collaborative software engineering across borders.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Sällberg, Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Numminen, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Who are the early adopters of alternative fuel technology?: A study of Swedish road freight companies2024In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 186, article id 104132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of three key firm characteristics (diversification, size, and age) on road freight companies’ early adoption of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). While previous studies have identified the determinants of the adoption intention of AFVs, a gap in the literature is research into firm characteristics and the early adopters of AFVs. Because early adopters play an important role in the diffusion of innovation, it is imperative to fill this gap. Based on a survey of 156 Swedish road freight companies and logistic regression analyses, we report that firm size and diversification affect the early adoption of AFVs. In addition, the partial impact of the importance of driver comfort and payload capacity on early adoption of AFVs has been reported. Other factors, including purchase price, fuel cost, and truck refueling efficiency, were not found to discriminate early adopters of AFVs from those who had not yet adopted AFVs. These findings imply to policymakers that the current instruments in use in Sweden, including the greenhouse gas mandate and the relatively high taxation on diesel fuel, have led to the adoption of AFVs by larger road freight companies. For vehicle producers aiming to scale up the production and sales of AFV, the findings suggest the benefit of targeting diversified and larger road freight companies in the first place. © 2024 The Author(s)

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Alawadi, Sadi
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science.
    Ait-Mlouk, Addi
    University of Skövde.
    Toor, Salman
    Uppsala University.
    Hellander, Andreas
    Uppsala University.
    Toward efficient resource utilization at edge nodes in federated learning2024In: Progress in Artificial Intelligence, ISSN 2192-6352, E-ISSN 2192-6360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Federated learning (FL) enables edge nodes to collaboratively contribute to constructing a global model without sharing their data. This is accomplished by devices computing local, private model updates that are then aggregated by a server. However, computational resource constraints and network communication can become a severe bottleneck for larger model sizes typical for deep learning (DL) applications. Edge nodes tend to have limited hardware resources (RAM, CPU), and the network bandwidth and reliability at the edge is a concern for scaling federated fleet applications. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a FL strategy inspired by transfer learning in order to reduce resource utilization on devices, as well as the load on the server and network in each global training round. For each local model update, we randomly select layers to train, freezing the remaining part of the model. In doing so, we can reduce both server load and communication costs per round by excluding all untrained layer weights from being transferred to the server. The goal of this study is to empirically explore the potential trade-off between resource utilization on devices and global model convergence under the proposed strategy. We implement the approach using the FL framework FEDn. A number of experiments were carried out over different datasets (CIFAR-10, CASA, and IMDB), performing different tasks using different DL model architectures. Our results show that training the model partially can accelerate the training process, efficiently utilizes resources on-device, and reduce the data transmission by around 75% and 53% when we train 25%, and 50% of the model layers, respectively, without harming the resulting global model accuracy. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a negative correlation between the number of participating clients in the training process and the number of layers that need to be trained on each client’s side. As the number of clients increases, there is a decrease in the required number of layers. This observation highlights the potential of the approach, particularly in cross-device use cases. © The Author(s) 2024.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Frattini, Julian
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Montgomery, Lloyd
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Fucci, Davide
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Mendez, Daniel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Fischbach, Jannik
    Netlight Consulting GmbH, Germany.
    Requirements quality research artifacts: Recovery, analysis, and management guideline2024In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 216, article id 112120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements quality research, which is dedicated to assessing and improving the quality of requirements specifications, is dependent on research artifacts like data sets (containing information about quality defects) and implementations (automatically detecting and removing these defects). However, recent research exposed that the majority of these research artifacts have become unavailable or have never been disclosed, which inhibits progress in the research domain. In this work, we aim to improve the availability of research artifacts in requirements quality research. To this end, we (1) extend an artifact recovery initiative, (2) empirically evaluate the reasons for artifact unavailability using Bayesian data analysis, and (3) compile a concise guideline for open science artifact disclosure. Our results include 10 recovered data sets and 7 recovered implementations, empirical support for artifact availability improving over time and the positive effect of public hosting services, and a pragmatic artifact management guideline open for community comments. With this work, we hope to encourage and support adherence to open science principles and improve the availability of research artifacts for the requirements research quality community. © 2024 The Author(s)

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Rainer, Austen
    et al.
    Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Wohlin, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Reporting case studies in systematic literature studies—An evidential problem2024In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 174, article id 107501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The term and label, “case study”, is not used consistently by authors of primary studies in software engineering research. It is not clear whether this problem also occurs for systematic literature studies (SLSs).

    Objective: To investigate the extent to which SLSs in/correctly use the term and label, “case study”, when classifying primary studies.

    Methods: We systematically collect two sub-samples (2010–2021 & 2022) comprising a total of eleven SLSs and 79 primary studies. We examine the designs of these SLSs, and then analyse whether the SLS authors and the primary-study authors correctly label the respective primary study as a “case study”.

    Results: 76% of the 79 primary studies are misclassified by SLSs (with the two sub-samples having 60% and 81% misclassification, respectively). For 39% of the 79 studies, the SLSs propagate a mislabelling by the original authors, whilst for 37%, the SLSs introduce a new mislabel, thus making the problem worse. SLSs rarely present explicit definitions for “case study” and when they do, the definition is not consistent with established definitions.

    Conclusions: SLSs are both propagating and exacerbating the problem of the mislabelling of primary studies as “case studies”, rather than – as we should expect of SLSs – correcting the labelling of primary studies, and thus improving the body of credible evidence. Propagating and exacerbating mislabelling undermines the credibility of evidence in terms of its quantity, quality and relevance to both practice and research. © 2024 The Author(s)

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Gerlitz, Laima
    et al.
    Hochschule Wismar, University of Applied Sciences: Technology, Business and Design, Germany.
    Meyer, Christopher
    Hochschule Wismar, University of Applied Sciences: Technology, Business and Design, Germany.
    Henesey, Lawrence
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science.
    Sourcing Sustainability Transition in Small and Medium-Sized Ports of the Baltic Sea Region: A Case of Sustainable Futuring with Living Labs2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 11, article id 4667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research points to an alternative concern against the mainstream research of future ports’ development by taking a transdisciplinary approach of a Living Lab (LL) concept for a better sustainability and innovation record in Small and Medium-Sized Ports (SMSPs). Deploying qualitative research for the examination of this new phenomenon of aggregating LLs into SMSPs, this research builds upon stakeholder workshops, in-depth interviews, and designed port pilots as case studies dedicated to innovation and sustainability transition in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) at the turn of 2030. Given its rich and significant empirical foundation, the present research substantially contributes to sustainability orientation and transitions in ports. The key original elements of this study are fourfold: (1) the research provides a theoretical and practical LL framework enabling innovation and sustainability to be grasped in ports in times of technological, social, and political disruption; (2) this research increases the minimal number of existing previous efforts studying SMSPs in the transitional discourse; (3) the paper addresses not only hard technological innovation concerns but also aspects of social acceptance and the role of social interactions; (4) the research goes beyond geographical boundaries of a single port, thus providing a joint and collaborative approach towards sustainability rather than an individual perception on sustainability transition, existing networks, and clusters. © 2024 by the authors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Kawuki, Tonny
    The Office of the Auditor General Uganda, Uganda.
    Månsson, Jonas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Nankaja, Christine
    The Office of the Auditor General Uganda, Uganda.
    Sund, Krister
    The Swedish National Audit Office.
    Wigren, Emma
    The Swedish National Audit Office.
    Zungu, Mathias Mulumba
    The Office of the Auditor General Uganda, Uganda.
    The impact of a reproductive health voucher in Uganda using a quasi-experimental matching design2024In: Reproductive Health, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses the impact of a voucher project that targeted vulnerable and poor pregnant women in Uganda. Highly subsidised vouchers gave access to a package of safe delivery services consisting of four antenatal visits, safe delivery, one postnatal visit, the treatment and management of selected pregnancy-related medical conditions and complications, and emergency transport. Vouchers were sold during the project’s operational period from 2016 to 2019. This study covers 8 out of 25 project-benefiting districts in Uganda and a total of 1,881 pregnancies, including both beneficiary and non-beneficiary mothers. Using a matching design, the results show a positive effect on the survival of new-born babies. The difference in the survival rate between the control group and the treatment group is 5.4% points, indicating that the voucher project reduced infant mortality by more than 65 per cent. © The Author(s) 2024.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Abbadi, Ahmad
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kokoroskos, Emmanouil
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Stamets, Matthew
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vetrano, Davide L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University.
    Wimo, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Olsson, Christina B.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wachtler, Caroline
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Validation of the Health Assessment Tool (HAT) based on four aging cohorts from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care2024In: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As global aging accelerates, routinely assessing the functional status and morbidity burden of older patients becomes paramount. The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the comprehensive clinical and functional Health Assessment Tool (HAT) based on four cohorts of older adults (60 + years) from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC) spanning urban, suburban, and rural areas.

    Methods: The HAT integrates five health indicators (gait speed, global cognition, number of chronic diseases, and basic and instrumental activities of daily living), providing an individual-level score between 0 and 10. The tool was constructed using nominal response models, first separately for each cohort and then in a harmonized dataset. Outcomes included all-cause mortality over a maximum follow-up of 16 years and unplanned hospital admissions over a maximum of 3 years of follow-up. The predictive capacity was assessed through the area under the curve (AUC) using logistic regressions. For time to death, Cox regressions were performed, and Harrell’s C-indices were reported. Results from the four cohorts were pooled using individual participant data meta-analysis and compared with those from the harmonized dataset.

    Results: The HAT demonstrated high predictive capacity across all cohorts as well as in the harmonized dataset. In the harmonized dataset, the AUC was 0.84 (95% CI 0.81–0.87) for 1-year mortality, 0.81 (95% CI 0.80–0.83) for 3-year mortality, 0.80 (95% CI 0.79–0.82) for 5-year mortality, 0.69 (95% CI 0.67–0.70) for 1-year unplanned admissions, and 0.69 (95% CI 0.68–0.70) for 3-year unplanned admissions. The Harrell’s C for time-to-death throughout 16 years of follow-up was 0.75 (95% CI 0.74–0.75).

    Conclusions: The HAT is a highly predictive, clinically intuitive, and externally valid instrument with potential for better addressing older adults’ health needs and optimizing risk stratification at the population level. © The Author(s) 2024.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Moyón, Fabiola
    et al.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Angermeir, Florian
    Fortiss, Germany.
    Mendez, Daniel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Industrial Challenges in Secure Continuous Development2024In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2024, p. 309-311Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intersection between security and continuous software engineering has been of great interest since the early years of the agile development movement, and it remains relevant as software development processes are more frequently guided by agility and the adoption of DevOps. Several authors have contributed studies about the framing of secure agile development and secure DevOps, motivating academic contributions to methods and practices, but also discussions around benefits and challenges. Especially the challenges captured also our interest since, for the last few years, we are conducting research on secure continuous software engineering from a more applied, practical perspective with the overarching aim to introduce solutions that can be adopted at scale. The short positioning at hands summarizes a relevant part of our endeavors in which we validated challenges with several practitioners of different roles. More than framing a set of challenges, we conclude by presenting four key research directions we identified for practitioners and researchers to delineate future work. Copyright © 2024 held by the owner/author(s).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Rehman, Mubeen UR
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Machchhar, Raj Jiten
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Bridging simulation granularity in system-of-systems: conjunct application of discrete element method and discrete event simulations in construction equipment design2024In: Proceedings of the Design Society / [ed] Storga M., Skec S., Martinec T., Marjanovic D., Pavkovic N., Skec M.M., Cambridge University Press, 2024, p. 2705-2714Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses a critical challenge in System-of-Systems (SoS) simulations arising from the different granularity levels in SoS simulations, integrating non-coupled Discrete Element Method results into SoS-level Discrete Event Simulations using surrogate modeling. Illustrated with a wheel loader bucket use-case in mining, it enhances early design decision-making and lays the groundwork for improving SoS simulations in construction equipment design. This paves the way for broader research and application across diverse engineering design domains. © 2024 Proceedings of the Design Society. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Machchhar, Raj Jiten
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Toller Melén, Carl Nils Konrad
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    A tradespace exploration approach for changeability assessment from a system-of-systems perspective: application from the construction machinery industry2024In: Proceedings of the Design Society / [ed] Storga M., Skec S., Martinec T., Marjanovic D., Pavkovic N., Skec M.M., Cambridges Institutes Press, 2024, p. 2655-2664Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of new technologies such as electrification, autonomy, and other contextual factors pose significant challenges to development teams in balancing competing aspects while developing value-robust solutions. One approach for achieving value robustness is designing for changeability. This paper presents a tradespace exploration from a Systems-of-Systems perspective to facilitate changeability assessment during early design stages. The approach is further demonstrated on a fleet of haulers operating in a mining site. © 2024 Proceedings of the Design Society. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Yu, Liang
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    Örebro University.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Visualizing CI’s role in software quality attribute evaluation: A Roadmap for Using Continuous Integration Environments2024In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality attributes of software systems, also known as system qualities, such as performance, security, and scalability, continue to grow in importance in industrial practice. The evaluation of quality attributes is critical to software development since optimizing a software system’s core attributes can provide marketing advantage and set a product apart from its competitors. Many existing studies of unsuccessful development projects report that lack of quality attribute evaluation is often a contributing factor of project failure. Therefore, continuous quality attribute evaluation, throughout the development process, is needed to ensure customers’ expectations and demands are met.

    Manual evaluation of software attributes is common in many software development companies, but it has proven to be insufficient in meeting the demands of rapid releases and high-quality expectations from customers. Automated practices have therefore gained widespread popularity as a solution to enhance efficiency, reduce costs, and increase accuracy compared to manual evaluation.

    One way to automate the evaluation is using continuous integration (CI) environments. The CI environment provides several benefits, such as fast feedback on code quality, early detection of quality defects, and visualization of system quality trends. As such, these environments inherently offer organizations the opportunity to continuously monitor the quality of their software systems. However, an immature automation process can result in negative outcomes, such as cost and schedule overruns, slow feedback loops, and delayed releases.

    To improve the evaluation process, prior studies have investigated different key areas, including knowledge, processes, tools, and metrics. While leveraging these areas can have a positive impact on quality evaluation, to the best of our knowledge, there is a lack of frameworks that link CI environment knowledge, metrics, and evolution together.

    In this article, we aim to fill this gap by presenting the state-of-practice of using CI environments for the evaluation of quality attributes. This is achieved through an industrial study at four partner companies. Study results show that metrics acquired from CI components have a positive effect on evaluating quality requirements. Through analyzing these results, we propose a model by providing guidelines to mature existing CI environments that organizations can use for quality improvements.

    As such, we claim the following contributions of this study:

    A generic model of how CI environments contribute to quality attribute evaluation.

    Empirical evidence that demonstrates how CI components can be used to produce data supporting the evaluation of quality attributes with metrics.

    A model, derived from the study results, which provides decision support to evolve software quality evaluation through CI environments over time. © 2024 Owner/Author.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Mallalieu, Adam Mattias
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jonasson, Amanda
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Petersson, Sara
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Rosendal, Marlene
    Engineers Without Borders, Sweden.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Almefelt, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Sustainability criteria for introducing new technologies in low-income contexts2024In: Proceedings of the Design Society / [ed] Storga M., Skec S., Martinec T., Marjanovic D., Pavkovic N., Skec M.M, Cambridge University Press, 2024, p. 1359-1368Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing new technologies in low-income contexts have potential for positive social impact, and such efforts are made by humanitarian engineering non-govermental organisations (NGOs). The impact can increase if a systemic sustainability perspective is considered in the design process. Sustainability criteria are identified using a literature study combined with an empirical study together with a Swedish NGO. These criteria are synthesized into a simplified Sustainability Fingerprint tool which is evaluated and deemed to be useful when introducing new technologies in low-income contexts. © 2024 Proceedings of the Design Society. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Andersson, Klara
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science. student.
    Landén, Erik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science. student.
    Goswami, Prashant
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science.
    Exploring the Effects of Foveated Rendering on Virtual Reality Game Graphics2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores foveated rendering for its quality impact on players in virtual reality (VR) video game settings. Foveated rendering has the potential to decrease the performance cost by only rendering the part of the scene where the user is looking at a higher resolution, which it achieves with the use of an eye tracker. A user study is conducted to test the perceived visualquality by playing a fast-paced shooter game that requires manyeye and head movements using a head-mounted display (HMD). The game is played with three different types of foveation: no foveation, static, and dynamic foveated rendering. Results show that the majority of participants did not notice a difference in the visual quality between the foveated and non-foveated game versions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Rouchy, Philippe
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Dave Randall: A Celebration in a Manner of a Biased Recollection2024In: A Festschrift -  in honor of David W. Randall / [ed] Richard Harper, Mark Rouncefield and Volker Wulf, Siegen: Universität Siegen , 2024, p. 49-50Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Volker Wulf:

    Dave started working academically as a researcher (and PhD student) at the famous SociologyDepartment of the University of Lancaster. In the early 1990s, Lancaster was one of Europe'sbreeding places for the newly emerging research field of Computer-Supported CooperativeWork (CSCW). It was the key place where the cooperation between Anthropology, in theGarfinkel and Wittgensteinian traditions, and Computer Science was explored. Dave was thelead researcher in investigating into the work of air traffic controllers with a perspective onexploring options to support their complex paper-based practices.

    To secure a faculty position, he later moved to Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU).Not untypical for CSCW researchers of his generation, this place was maybe a bit below hisacademic standards and aspirations. Building an international network of cooperation, hedeveloped, however, his own vision of how ethnographic work would enrich design practices.Being a bright and prolific writer, he published his academic work in all major conferences andjournals of our field. He also took much more than his proportional share in servicing ourcommunity by reviewing and working in program committees. Leading internationalcompanies, such as Microsoft and Hitachi, and government agencies were eager to be consultedby him.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Moraes, Ana Luiza Dallora
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Andersson, Ewa Kazimiera
    Linnaeus University.
    Palm, Bruna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Jönköping University.
    Marcinowicz, Ludmiła
    Medical University of Bialystok, Poland.
    Stjernberg, Louise
    Malmö University.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Nursing Students’ Attitudes Toward Technology: Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study2024In: JMIR Medical Education, E-ISSN 2369-3762, Vol. 10, article id e50297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The growing presence of digital technologies in health care requires the health workforce to have proficiency in subjects such as informatics. This has implications in the education of nursing students, as their preparedness to use these technologies in clinical situations is something that course administrators need to consider. Thus, students’ attitudes toward technology could be investigated to assess their needs regarding this proficiency. Objective: This study aims to investigate attitudes (enthusiasm and anxiety) toward technology among nursing students and to identify factors associated with those attitudes. Methods: Nursing students at 2 universities in Sweden and 1 university in Poland were invited to answer a questionnaire. Data about attitudes (anxiety and enthusiasm) toward technology, eHealth literacy, electronic device skills, and frequency of using electronic devices and sociodemographic data were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the data. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical inferences. Results: In total, 646 students answered the questionnaire—342 (52.9%) from the Swedish sites and 304 (47.1%) from the Polish site. It was observed that the students’ technology enthusiasm (techEnthusiasm) was on the higher end of the Technophilia instrument (score range 1-5): 3.83 (SD 0.90), 3.62 (SD 0.94), and 4.04 (SD 0.78) for the whole sample, Swedish students, and Polish students, respectively. Technology anxiety (techAnxiety) was on the midrange of the Technophilia instrument: 2.48 (SD 0.96), 2.37 (SD 1), and 2.60 (SD 0.89) for the whole sample, Swedish students, and Polish students, respectively. Regarding techEnthusiasm among the nursing students, a negative correlation with age was found for the Swedish sample (P<.001; ρSwedish=−0.201) who were generally older than the Polish sample, and positive correlations with the eHealth Literacy Scale score (P<.001; ρall=0.265; ρSwedish=0.190; ρPolish=0.352) and with the perceived skill in using computer devices (P<.001; ρall=0.360; ρSwedish=0.341; ρPolish=0.309) were found for the Swedish, Polish, and total samples. Regarding techAnxiety among the nursing students, a positive correlation with age was found in the Swedish sample (P<.001; ρSwedish=0.184), and negative correlations with eHealth Literacy Scale score (P<.001; ρall=−0.196; ρSwedish=−0.262; ρPolish=−0.133) and with the perceived skill in using computer devices (P<.001; ρall=−0.209; ρSwedish=−0.347; ρPolish=−0.134) were found for the Swedish, Polish, and total samples and with the semester only for the Swedish sample (P<.001; ρSwedish=−0.124). Gender differences were found regarding techAnxiety in the Swedish sample, with women exhibiting a higher mean score than men (2.451, SD 1.014 and 1.987, SD 0.854, respectively). Conclusions: This study highlights nursing students’ techEnthusiasm and techAnxiety, emphasizing correlations with various factors. With health care’s increasing reliance on technology, integrating health technology–related topics into education is crucial for future professionals to address health care challenges effectively. ©Ana Luiza Dallora, Ewa Kazimiera Andersson, Bruna Gregory Palm, Doris Bohman, Gunilla Björling, Ludmiła Marcinowicz, Louise Stjernberg, Peter Anderberg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Barlo, Alexander
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Sigvant, Mats
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Pilthammar, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Investigation of Temperature Impact on Friction Conditions in Running Production of Automotive Body Components2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the running production of automotive body components drifts in theprocess window is seen causing problems with non-conforming parts. Up until now, these driftshave been counter-acted based on the knowledge and experience of the press line operators.This experience-based process control will however become more troublesome in the future asrecycled material grades will undoubtedly present larger in-coil variations in material parametersand effect also the friction conditions from component to component.The following study will present two cases from production of the Volvo XC60. For thetwo cases, the initial simulations made for the components showed a safe part, but duringrunning production failure occurred suspected to be due to temperature effects in the tribologysystem. The study will furthermore present updated simulations considering developing thermaleffects to replicate the failures, as well as present both standard and thermal simulations of theadjustments made in production.

    Download full text (pdf)
    TemperatureImpact_Barlo2024
  • Barlo, Alexander
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Aeddula, Omsri
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Chezan, Toni
    TATA Steel Europe.
    Pilthammar, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Volvo Cars.
    Sigvant, Mats
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering. AutoForm Engineering Sweden AB.
    Creating a Virtual Shadow of the Manufacturing of Automotive Components2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the automotive industry, there is an increasing demand for a paradigmshift in terms of which materials are used for the manufacturing of the automotive body. Globalclimate goals are forcing a rapid adaption of new, advanced, sustainable material grades suchas the fossil free steels and materials containing higher scrap content. With the introduction ofthese new and untested materials, methods for accounting for variation in material propertiesare needed directly in the press lines.The following study will focus on creating an initial virtual shadow of the manufacturing of aVolvo XC90 inner door panel through the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Thevirtual shadow differs from the concept of the digital twin by only being a virtual representationof the production line, with training data generated exclusively by numerical simulations, andhaving no automated communication with the physical press line control system. The virtualshadow can be used as an assistance to the press line operators to see how different press linesettings and material parameter variations will impact the quality of the stamped component.The study aims to validate the virtual shadow through accurate predictions of the materialdraw-in measured in the physical press line.

    Download full text (pdf)
    CreatingAVirtualShadowOfTheManufacturingofAutomotiveComponents_2024
  • Lorensen, Karl
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University, USA.
    Öinert, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Rank conditions and amenability for rings associated to graphsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We study path rings, Cohn path rings, and Leavitt path rings associated to directed graphs, with coefficients in an arbitrary ring R. For each of these types of rings, we stipulate conditions on the graph that are necessary and sufficient to ensure that the ring satisfies either the rank condition or the strong rank condition whenever R enjoys the same property. In addition, we apply our result for path rings and the strong rank condition to characterize the graphs that give rise to amenable path algebras and exhaustively amenable path algebras.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • Machado, Natã
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Öinert, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Wagner, Stefan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Non-Abelian extensions of groupoids and their groupoid ringsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a geometrically oriented classification theory for non-Abelian extensions of groupoids generalizing the classification theory for Abelian extensions of groupoids by Westman as well as the familiar classification theory for non-Abelian extensions of groups by Schreier and Eilenberg-MacLane. As an application of our techniques we demonstrate that each extension of groupoids N→E→G gives rise to a groupoid crossed product of G by the groupoid ring of N which recovers the groupoid ring of E up to isomorphism. Furthermore, we make the somewhat surprising observation that our classification methods naturally transfer to the class of groupoid crossed products, thus providing a classification theory for this class of rings. Our study is motivated by the search for natural examples of groupoid crossed products.

    Download full text (pdf)
    arXiv preprint