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  • Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Khan, Imran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Muhammad, Moazzam
    Rabbani, Muhammad Shoaib
    BTH.
    Johansson, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Performance evaluation of control algorithms implemented on a remotely controlled active noise control laboratory2013In: Active Noise and Vibration Control in Practical System Implementations, 2013, 731Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The remotely controlled laboratory setup for Active Noise Control (ANC) developed by Blekin-ge Institute of Technology, Sweden provides an efficient learning platform for the students to implement and learn ANC algorithms with real world physical system, hardware and signals. The initial laboratory prototype based on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) TMS320C6713 from Texas Instruments (TI) was successfully tested with Filtered-x Least Mean Square (F-XLMS) algorithm applied to control noise in a ventilation duct. The resources of the DSP platform used in the remote laboratory setup enable testing and investigating substantially more challenging and computationally demanding algorithms. In this paper, we expand the horizon of the laboratory setup by testing more advanced and complicated single channel feed forward ANC algorithms. Filtered-x versions of algorithms such as the normalized least mean square (N-LMS), leaky least mean square (L-LMS), Filtered-U recursive least mean square (FURLMS) and recursive least square (RLS) algorithm etc. have been implemented utilizing the remote web based client provided in the remote laboratory. A comprehensive performance comparison of the aforementioned algorithms for the remote laboratory setup is presented to demonstrate the viability of the remote laboratory.

  • Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Khan, Imran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Gertsovich, Irina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Johansson, Per-Erik
    Wirenstedt, Maria
    Borja, Oscar
    Petersson, Stefan
    MRI SCANNER VIBRATION PATH ANALYSIS2013In: Machinery Noise and Vibration, 2013, 725Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner is one of the most important tools in clinical diagnostics. MRI scanners are associated by strong vibration which results in unpleasant and disturbing acoustic noise. The primary source of this vibration is the Lorentz force produced by fast switching of the currents inside the gradient coils of MRI scanners under a strong static magnetic field. During an MR-imaging scan the switching is controlled in order to spatially code the hydrogen nuclei that will generate the signal, which is reconstructed into anatomical images. Faster switching of the currents allows for shorter scan times and/or higher image resolutions. Consequently, the clinical quality has motivated the drive for shorter switching time and higher currents. This development, however, has also caused an undesired increase of MRI vibrations. The overall vibration phenomenon of an installed fully functional MRI scanner system becomes unique because of the installed location and ambiance. This vibration can potentially degrade the image quality and hence the diagnosis. Apart from the vibration produced, the associated annoying acoustic noise may not only affect the patients under examination and the clinical staff, but may also be transmitted to other parts of the building and causing discomfort for the personnel working there. In order to devise an effective isolation plan or improve an existing one both for vibration and acoustic noise it is important to study the noise and vibration transfer paths. This paper concerns an investigation of vibration transfer paths for vibration excited by an installed functional MRI scanner at a medical facility. The vibration transfer paths have been investigated experimentally. The obtained results are presented and discussed.

  • Munir, Hussan
    et al.
    Lund University, SWE.
    Munir, Hussan
    Lund University, SWE.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Lund University, SWE.
    Runeson, Per
    Lund University, SWE.
    Open innovation in software engineering: a systematic mapping study2015In: Empirical Software Engineering, Vol. 21, no 2, 684-723 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open innovation (OI) means that innovation is fostered by using both external and internal influences in the innovation process. In software engineering (SE), OI has existed for decades, while we currently see a faster and broader move towards OI in SE. We therefore survey research on how OI takes place and contributes to innovation in SE. This study aims to synthesize the research knowledge on OI in the SE domain. We launched a systematic mapping study and conducted a thematic analysis of the results. Moreover, we analyzed the strength of the evidence in the light of a rigor and relevance assessment of the research. We identified 33 publications, divided into 9 themes related to OI. 17/33 studies fall in the high–rigor/high–relevance category, suggesting the results are highly industry relevant. The research indicates that start-ups have higher tendency to opt for OI compared to incumbents. The evidence also suggests that firms assimilating knowledge into their internal R&D activities, have higher likelihood of gaining financial advantages. We concluded that OI should be adopted as a complementary approach to facilitate internal innovation and not to substitute it. Further research is advised on situated OI strategies and the interplay between OI and agile practices.

  • Asklund, Ulf
    et al.
    Lund University, SWE.
    Asklund, Ulf
    Lund University, SWE.
    Höst, Martin
    Lund University, SWE.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Experiences from Monitoring Effect of Architectural Changes2016In: Software Quality.: The Future of Systems- and Software Development / [ed] Winkler, Dietmar, Biffl, Stefan, Bergsmann, Johannes, 2016, 97-108 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common situation is that an initial architecture has been sufficient in the initial phases of a project, but when the size and complexity of the product increases the architecture must be changed. In this paper experiences are presented from changing an architecture into independent units, providing basic reuse of main functionality although giving higher priority to independence than reuse. An objective was also to introduce metrics in order to monitor the architectural changes. The change was studied in a case-study through weekly meetings with the team, collected metrics, and questionnaires. The new architecture was well received by the development team, who found it to be less fragile. Concerning the metrics for monitoring it was concluded that a high abstraction level was useful for the purpose.

  • Public defence: 2017-01-27 09:15 J1650, Karlskrona, Sweden
    França, César Levy
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    França, César Levy
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Business Model Design for Strategic Sustainable Development2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity confronts an existential threat without historic precedent. Environmental pressures have reached such intensity and pace of change that the earth system may be irreversibly tipped into a new and unpredictable state. The emerging global reality is, in turn, redefining overall conditions for business success. Addressing these challenges both demands and brings great opportunities for innovation. An important and sometimes neglected aspect of innovation is the design or redesign of business models, which has been identified as a greater source of lasting competitive advantage than new products and services per se. The business model has also been suggested as a new unit of analysis when discussing sustainability. However, this is still a relatively underexplored area. The aim of this work was therefore to develop an approach to business model design that supports strategic sustainable development, i.e., supports organizations to contribute to society’s transition towards sustainability in a way that strengthens the organization.    

     

    To be able to design a business model that supports strategic sustainable development, it is necessary to know what sustainability is and how to develop sustainability-promoting, economically viable strategies. Therefore, the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, which includes, e.g., an operational definition of sustainability and strategic guidelines for how to approach it, was used as an overarching framework. Specific research methods and techniques included, e.g., literature reviews, questionnaires, interviews, work with focus groups, participatory action research with partner organizations, creative problem solving techniques, modeling, and simulation.

     

    The literature reviews revealed potential sustainability benefits of developing business models in conjunction with product-service systems (PSS). However, a knowledge gap exists regarding how to effectively connect these fields. Arguably, PSS strategies can best contribute to sustainability when business models support their implementation and when both the business models and the PSS strategies are guided by an understanding of strategic sustainable development. Therefore, an integrated approach to Business Model Design for Strategic Sustainable Development was co-developed and tested in PSS innovation work with partners, e.g., companies within the energy and lighting sectors. The tests indicated that the new approach helped to clarify strengths and weaknesses of current business models from a strategic sustainability perspective; to transform an organization’s vision and strategy into a sustainability-framed vision and a sustainability-promoting strategy; and to communicate the new vision and strategy to the value network as a basis for engaging important stakeholders in the change. For example, the approach supported one of the partner companies in its transformation towards providing sustainable PSS solutions in the form of light as a service.

    Examples of business benefits of the new approach include improved scalability and risk avoidance, which provide a foundation for better investment strategies. Benefits also include improved differentiability and a broadened view on, and a more solid foundation for, collaboration with stakeholders that are increasingly important to sustainable business success.

  • Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Publikationsstatistik för BTH 2009 – 2015: Rapport för årsredovisningen 20152016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Baugher, John Eric
    et al.
    Baugher, John Eric
    Osika, Walter
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ecological Consciousness, Moral Imagination,and the Framework for Strategic SustainableDevelopment2016In: Creative Social Change: Leadership for a Healthy World / [ed] Kathryn Goldman Schuyler, John Eric Baugher, Karin Jironet, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, 119-142 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Persson, Ingrid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Persson, Ingrid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Det svenska fritidshuset: en historia2016In: Svenska fritidshus: i urval av Arkitektur Förlag / [ed] Julia Svensson, Arkitektur förlag AB , 2016, 18-23 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Persson, Ingrid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Persson, Ingrid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Prefabricated wooden houses in the Swedish Welfare State2015In: / [ed] Petra Lohmann, Universitet Siegen, Departrment Architektur , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction and building of wooden houses have a long tradition in Sweden. Traditional timber houses built of logs dovetailed at the corners were generally movable since the construction could be understood as a kind of jig-saw puzzle. The use of steam sawmills during the latter half of the nineteen century changed the conditions for the Swedish forest industry. The modern, rational and mass produced wooden houses of the period of 1960 – 1980 as they appear in contemporary advertisements form a sharp contrast to what is often seen as the icon of Swedish second homes, namely the red old cottage, former part of peasant society. These decades also meant the greatest period of expansion of vacation houses in Sweden. The reasons were an enlarged economic space for consumption, a growing middle-class, more time for leisure and an industry capable of producing the commodity for consumption. The flexibility in the construction of prefabrication made it possible to promise solutions that were said to be individually suited, though the products were mass produced and factory made.    

  • Trygg, Louise
    et al.
    Trygg, Louise
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    França, Cesar-Levy
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    District Heating and CHP: A Vital Role for the Development towards a Sustainable Society?2012In: Latest trends in sustainable and green deveopment - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Urban Sustainability, Cultural Sustainability, Green Development, Green Structures and Clean Cars (USCUDAR 12), WSEAS Press , 2012, 157-167 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, district heating (DH) is quite well developed and is already mainly based on non-fossil fuels. Increased use of DH is therefore considered as a way of phasing out fossil energy for heating purposes. Furthermore, increased use of DH provides an increased basis for combined heat and power production (CHP). Considering that coal condensing is the marginal production of electricity in Europe, increased use of bio-fueled CHP leads to even greater reductions of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, in a sustainable society, where there is no longer a systematic increase of CO2 (and no other sustainability problems), the benefits of DH are less obvious. The aim of this work is to explore the impact of DH and CHP in the development towards such a society. A local energy system is studied for five different time periods from 2010 to 2060 with different marginal technologies for electricity production. Results show that when the local energy utility co-operate with a local industry plant and invests in a new CHP plant for waste incineration the global CO2 emissions for the whole studied time period will be reduced with about 48 000 tonnes, which corresponds to over 100 % of the emissions from today’s system for the same time period. When considering that bio fuel is a scarce resource, and that the amount of CO2 emission linked to waste probably will be lower in sustainable society, the global CO2 emissions will be about 250% lower compared to the system of today. The studied DH related cooperation and introduction of CHP will reduce the system cost for the whole studied energy system with 2 500 MSEK for the studied period. In general, the results indicate that the modeled measures will not have any major advantages over other heating technologies in a sustainable society but that it can play a vital role for the development towards such a society.

  • França, Cesar-Levy
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. BTH.
    França, Cesar-Levy
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. BTH.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Trygg, Louise
    Sustainability Self-Assessment and Business Model Design2012In: Proceedings of the 17th Sustainable Innovation Conference, 2012, 89-100 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The business case of sustainability has been argued for by many authors (Willard, 2005; McNall et al., 2011). There is a large degree of consensus regarding the potential business impact of sustainability. However, most companies either are not acting or are falling short on execution (MIT Sloan, 2009). Relatively few companies consider innovation for sustainability substantially rewarding. Suggested solution for this includes better access to frameworks for understanding sustainability and value creation and the business cases thereof (MIT Sloan, 2009). Furthermore, it is well-known that support for generation and selection of ideas and for formulating goals and strategies is especially essential to have during the early phases of the innovation process (Roozenburg & Eekels, 1995).

     

    The usual absence of an operational definition of sustainability is still a major barrier to corporate strategic sustainable development (Holmberg & Robèrt, 2000). A sustainability definition that can guide assessment of the current situation and stimulate generation of ideas for upstream solutions and strategic guidelines that can aid prioritization of early smart actions are among the most promising leverage points. A framework including those features is being developed in an international consensus process since twenty years (see, e.g., Robèrt et al., 2012). Among other things, this framework for strategic sustainable development FSSD, clarifies the self-interest in sustainability work and thus supports more widespread and proactive sustainable innovation. 

    In this study, the FSSD is used as the main basis for a new tool to be used in early phases of the innovation process for self-assessment of an organization’s current maturity and performance from an overall strategic sustainability point of view and for stimulating generation of ideas for business models design. We present a prototype version of such a tool and results from initial tests of this tool performed in four organizations. We study in particular whether the outlined tool is perceived by the organizations to be: (i) easy to comprehend, (ii) relevant, (iii) capable of differentiating the organizations in a comprehensive way, (iv) helpful for discovering insufficiencies that the organizations are not already aware of and (v) helpful for generation and selection of ideas for upstream solutions, business model innovation and for formulation of goals, and strategies. 

  • Erlandsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Fredrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    Bródka, Piotr
    Wrocƚaw University of Technology, POL.
    Borg, Anton
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    Johnson, Henric
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    Finding Influential Users in Social Media Using Association Rule Learning2016In: Entropy, ISSN 1099-4300, E-ISSN 1099-4300, Vol. 18, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influential users play an important role in online social networks since users tend to have an impact on one other. Therefore, the proposed work analyzes users and their behavior in order to identify influential users and predict user participation. Normally, the success of a social media site is dependent on the activity level of the participating users. For both online social networking sites and individual users, it is of interest to find out if a topic will be interesting or not. In this article, we propose association learning to detect relationships between users. In order to verify the findings, several experiments were executed based on social network analysis, in which the most influential users identified from association rule learning were compared to the results from Degree Centrality and Page Rank Centrality. The results clearly indicate that it is possible to identify the most influential users using association rule learning. In addition, the results also indicate a lower execution time compared to state-of-the-art methods.

  • Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    BTH Newsletter on Science Publishing and Information about Research Funding: December 20162016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))