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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Nord, C. (2022). Family houses–building an intergenerational space in post-apartheid Namibia. Canadian Journal of African Studies, 56(2), 427-451
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family houses–building an intergenerational space in post-apartheid Namibia
2022 (English)In: Canadian Journal of African Studies, ISSN 0008-3968, E-ISSN 1923-3051, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 427-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study presents how intergenerational relationships have spatially shaped the former apartheid township Kuisebmond in Walvis Bay, Namibia. The apartheid housing, which was designed for nuclear families, now accommodates multiple generations. People in different age cohorts are distributed differently in space. People in late later life lived in the former township housing units, whilst people in early later life lived in backyard shacks or other rentals. Certain patterns of cohabitation with younger relatives were discernible. It is highly likely that the extended family will be an important facet of Namibian urban life in the foreseeable future, since traditional family patterns have been interpreted in an urbanised form. It is of great importance that housing can accommodate various versions of the extended family, necessary for family existence and intergenerational obligations of resource pooling. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2022
Keywords
family house, intergenerational relations, Namibia, older people, township
National Category
Human Geography Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22172 (URN)10.1080/00083968.2021.1938618 (DOI)000696872500001 ()2-s2.0-85115167910 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0140:1
Note

open access

Available from: 2021-10-01 Created: 2021-10-01 Last updated: 2022-08-09Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. (2022). Institutional Traits in an African Residence for Older Adults: An Obstacle to Community Care?. Journal of Aging and Environment, 36(4), 433-449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutional Traits in an African Residence for Older Adults: An Obstacle to Community Care?
2022 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Environment, ISSN 2689-2618, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 433-449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This ethnographic study explores an old age home in a former township in Walvis Bay, Namibia as an institution to investigate its potential to be interwoven in community care services for older adults. Interviews with older adults from the community revealed highly negative opinions about the residence that equated it to an institution. These opinions are compared with conditions in the OAH and the residents’ views. The old age home was much more heterogenous as regards the composition of residents than what was perceived by older adults who lived in the community, who considered the home an option only for people who were childless or had been abandoned. Older adults who voluntarily lived alone in the home represented a new lifestyle that challenged the traditional family care practice that is the norm in later life. There was however some truth to the interviewees’ perceptions of coercive elements, both in terms of practices and architectural design. The paper argues that it is necessary to reduce the stigma that prevents residential care from being an accepted part of community care and a housing option in the future. The study result shows a number of potentialities that can contribute to this. © 2021 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
African older adults, community service, independent living, institution, residential care, aged, article, community care, controlled study, family counseling, home for the aged, human, interview, lifestyle, Namibia, perception, resident, stigma
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22228 (URN)10.1080/26892618.2021.1987372 (DOI)000889497000005 ()2-s2.0-85116473082 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P 15-0140:1
Note

open access

Available from: 2021-10-22 Created: 2021-10-22 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. (2022). Post-colonial architecture: deterritorialisation of apartheid township housing and mass-housing. Journal of Architecture, 27(1), 71-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-colonial architecture: deterritorialisation of apartheid township housing and mass-housing
2022 (English)In: Journal of Architecture, ISSN 1360-2365, E-ISSN 1466-4410, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 71-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative ethnographic study presents how intergenerational relationships have shaped the architecture of housing in the former apartheid township Kuisebmond in Walvis Bay, Namibia. The township housing, which was designed for nuclear families, now accommodates multiple generations. The original, small, single-family dwellings have become family houses by horizontal additions and extensions. The plots are often skilfully developed according to the families’ needs. In some cases, they have become impressive buildings, housing many individuals. Since formal housing provision has not been able to keep pace with urbanisation, informal housing has been constructed in the form of backyard shacks on the plots of the former township dwellings. These often mimic the former township housing units, albeit on a very small scale. Formal housing, reconstructed or not, together with backyard shacks, constitutes a social geography of intergenerational relations of the extended family. This pattern of urban restructuring affords a scaffolding for extended family needs and an architecture of resistance to apartheid social engineering. The paper reveals an important lesson for housing providers, which is intended as a critical commentary on the persistent tendency of present-day government to continue with the formula of mass-housing with spatially limited single-family dwellings as the former township houses. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22980 (URN)10.1080/13602365.2022.2054015 (DOI)000794304700001 ()2-s2.0-85129835086 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access.

Available from: 2022-05-24 Created: 2022-05-24 Last updated: 2022-12-29Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. & Ananias, J. (2022). Urbanised Ageing and Strategic Welfare Space in a Namibian Former Township. African Studies, 81(1), 45-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urbanised Ageing and Strategic Welfare Space in a Namibian Former Township
2022 (English)In: African Studies, ISSN 0002-0184, E-ISSN 1469-2872, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 45-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The number of African older people who live permanently in urban areas is growing. This qualitative ethnographic study explores how older people employ welfare strategies, often involving members of the extended family in mutual care and support. These welfare strategies are emplaced; in this case, in different housing types in a former township in Namibia - Kuisebmond in Walvis Bay. Older people stay in former township houses, in backyard shacks or other rentals, or at an old-age home. Government welfare that was adjusted to family needs appeared in similar shapes in these housing types, such as access to better schools. Older people were both caregivers and receivers of care in these efforts. Taking care of grandchildren while their parents migrated for work was a mutuality of informal support that was highly beneficial to all involved. The non-contributory pensions facilitated many strategies by alleviating risks. Access to high quality housing and government healthcare made urban living a feasible alternative that challenged rural living. The study concludes that housing is a strategic welfare space where formal and informal welfare are optimised in various ways. Older individuals contribute to a large extent to the adjustment, maintenance, and development of these joint spaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
ageing, township, welfare, housing, strategic welfare space, Namibia
National Category
Economics Social Work Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22947 (URN)10.1080/00020184.2022.2060796 (DOI)000790198400001 ()2-s2.0-85129256861 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P15-0140:1
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-05-20 Created: 2022-05-20 Last updated: 2022-11-18Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. (2021). Liminal space and the negotiation of care work in extra-care housing. Health and Place, 69, Article ID 102575.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liminal space and the negotiation of care work in extra-care housing
2021 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 69, article id 102575Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is a qualitative case study of care work in a liminal space, specifically the case of an extra-care housing residence, which is an innovative housing alternative for elderly people in need of care in Sweden. The study is an exploration of social care workers' perceptions about their workplaces and their understandings of themselves, which are shaped by their embeddedness in architectural space. The extra-care housing residence appeared as a liminal space in which two dominant spaces – home care services and residential care – underpinned the staff's perceptions of an unclear workplace and their identity work. © 2021 The Author

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2021
Keywords
Architectural space, Care work, Elderly, Extra-care housing, Liminal space, aged, article, home care, housing, human, negotiation, perception, residential care, social care, Sweden, worker, workplace
National Category
Nursing Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-21413 (URN)10.1016/j.healthplace.2021.102575 (DOI)000663414400006 ()2-s2.0-85105358747 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-00427
Note

open access

Available from: 2021-05-21 Created: 2021-05-21 Last updated: 2021-09-02Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. (2020). Available space: architectural agency and spatial decision-making in a caring organization. In: Gromark, Sten & Andersson, Björn (Ed.), Architecture for residential care and ageing communities: spaces for dwelling and healthcare. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Available space: architectural agency and spatial decision-making in a caring organization
2020 (English)In: Architecture for residential care and ageing communities: spaces for dwelling and healthcare / [ed] Gromark, Sten & Andersson, Björn, London: Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2020
Keywords
architectural agency, elderly, organisation
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-19503 (URN)9780367358730 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2020-05-27 Created: 2020-05-27 Last updated: 2020-10-15Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. & Byerley, A. (2020). Translocal Optimisation: Assembling Rural and Urban Spaces for Later Life in Urban Namibia and Uganda. Journal of Southern African Studies, 46(1), 109-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translocal Optimisation: Assembling Rural and Urban Spaces for Later Life in Urban Namibia and Uganda
2020 (English)In: Journal of Southern African Studies, ISSN 0305-7070, E-ISSN 1465-3893, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is often assumed that sub-Saharan African urban migrants return in later life to the villages from which they originated. This article challenges this model of circular migration by exploring the strategies of older adults who live permanently in urban areas. The empirical material comes from ethnographic case studies in two industrial towns formed by the apartheid and colonial housing policies of the 1950s and 1960s: Kuisebmond in Walvis Bay, Namibia, a former apartheid ‘location’; and Walukuba in Jinja, Uganda, a former ‘African’ rental estate. Older adults’ housing situation and its significance for their strategies and choices in later life provide the focus. The results show that even if many strategies appeared that are often associated with a return to the rural place of origin, for many the move back to the village was not a viable option. Participants in the study nurtured contacts with their places of origin, for example by making regular visits, sending remittances, contributing to housing in the village and receiving relatives in town. It is argued that these strategies, together with urban advantages–in particular a good housing situation–must be understood as translocal optimisation, in which potentialities emerge from an assemblage of various actors in different, connected locales. The optimal situation in which to age–in rural or urban areas–is a product of co-emergent actors and not necessarily an individual choice on the part of the older adult. The study concludes that urban living in later life seems to be an alternative choice for a group of older adults and must be acknowledged. © 2020, © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
assemblage, housing, later life, migration, potentiality, rural–urban connection, urbanisation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-19274 (URN)10.1080/03057070.2020.1718382 (DOI)000534377700008 ()2-s2.0-85079733583 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2020-03-05 Created: 2020-03-05 Last updated: 2020-06-24Bibliographically approved
Berglund Snodgrass, L. & Nord, C. (2019). The Continuation of Dwelling: Safety as a Situated Effect of Multi-Actor Interactions Within Extra-Care Housing in Sweden. Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 33(2), 171-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Continuation of Dwelling: Safety as a Situated Effect of Multi-Actor Interactions Within Extra-Care Housing in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 171-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the space–time situatedness of residing within extra-care housing (ECH) in Sweden. EHC constitutes an example of ordinary housing but is often categorized, along with senior housing, as “in-between housing.” What differentiates the extra-care housing from the ordinary is an age limit for moving in, the provision of communal facilities, and the presence of staff at certain times each week. Two housings with different environmental and architectural conditions have been analyzed through spatial analyses, observations, and interviews with residents (n = 18). The article concludes that the two different assemblings enabled two very different possibilities for accessing “safe aging.” One offered opportunities for the continuation of identities which contributed to feelings of safety, and one demanded the reconstitution of identities for developing meaning in the new housing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Safety, extra-care housing, space–time trajectories, architecture, assemblings
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17532 (URN)10.1080/02763893.2018.1534181 (DOI)000469912600006 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-00427
Note

open access

Available from: 2019-01-27 Created: 2019-01-27 Last updated: 2020-10-15Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. (2018). Resident-centred care and architecture of two different types of caring residences: a comparative study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13(1), Article ID 1472499.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resident-centred care and architecture of two different types of caring residences: a comparative study
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1472499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between architectural space and resident-centred care is poorly understood, even though architectural space is indicated as an important factor in the quality of care. This paper aims to address this gap in existing research by putting resident-centred care in the theoretical context of relationality and emergence in which space is a co-producing component. This qualitative case study includes two housing alternatives, which are compared: one assisted living and one extra-care housing residence, which differ in their legal status and architecturally. Similar fieldwork was carried out in the two residences. Individual interviews with staff and residents, as well as observations—direct and shadowing—were the main data collection methods. The concept of assemblage was used for the analysis of how resident-centred care and architectural space co-evolved. The findings show that resident-centred care appears in similar but also diverse and sometimes contradictory ways in different spaces in the two housing alternatives, suggesting that resident-centred care is situated, volatile and emergent. Although architecture has strong agency, space and care need to be considered together—a caring architecture—in order to understand the nuances and rich conceptual palette of resident-centred care. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2018
Keywords
architectural space, assemblage, assisted living, extra-care housing, Patient-centred care, adult, article, assisted living facility, comparative study, controlled study, field work, housing, human, interview, patient care, resident, staff, theoretical study
National Category
Nursing Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16543 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2018.1472499 (DOI)000434312000001 ()2-s2.0-85048038806 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2022-05-25Bibliographically approved
Nord, C. & Högström, E. (Eds.). (2017). Caring Architecture: Institutions and Relational Practices. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring Architecture: Institutions and Relational Practices
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Architecture is hard stuff. It is formed by walls, roofs, floors, all components of hard materials, stone, glass and wood. It distributes people in space and directs their doings and movements. Institutions are even harder stuff. Order is pushed a step further by the coerciveness of discursive architectural models and caring practices, restricting options to certain ways of thinking and acting. This book sets out to illuminate how people and spaces negotiate, and often challenge, regularities and patterns embedded in the meeting between architecture and institutions. It contains a number of essays by authors from disciplines such as human geography, architecture, planning, design, social work and education. The essays discuss different examples from institutions in which care is carried out; assisted living facilities, residential care for children, psychiatric care facilities and hospitals. By adopting a non-representational perspective, emergent practices render visible capacities of being flexible and mouldable, in which institutional architecture is defied, contested and transformed. New situations appear which transgress physical space in partnership with those who populate it, whether humans or non-humans. This book reveals the relational and transformative conditions of care architecture and the way in which institutions transform (or not) into Caring Architecture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017
Keywords
architecture, care, non-representational theory
National Category
Architectural Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15199 (URN)978-1-4438-9896-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-24 Created: 2017-09-24 Last updated: 2020-10-14Bibliographically approved
Projects
Nordic network for research on old people´s housing [2015-01480_Forte]; Blekinge Institute of Technology; Publications
Nord, C. & Högström, E. (Eds.). (2017). Caring Architecture: Institutions and Relational Practices. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars PublishingHögström, E. & Nord, C. (2017). Introduction. In: Nord, Catharina & Högström, Ebba (Ed.), Caring architecture.: Institutions and relational practices. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars PublishingNord, C. (2017). Stratum architecture: an iterated architectural assemblage of care for the very aged. In: Nord, Catharina & Högström, Ebba (Ed.), Caring architecture: institutions and relational practices (pp. 67-83). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
CollAge. Collaboratively developing age-friendly communities with municipality eldercare, spatial planning and Senior Citizens’ Councils [2021-01424_Forte]; Blekinge Institute of Technology
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5295-2482

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