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Jabangwe, Ronald
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Duc, A., Jabangwe, R., Paul, P. & Abrahamsson, P. (2017). Security challenges in IoT development: A software engineering perspective. In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: . Paper presented at 2017 XP Scientific Workshops, XP, Cologne. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), F129907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Security challenges in IoT development: A software engineering perspective
2017 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, Vol. F129907Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The rapid growth of Internet-of-things (IoT) software applications has driven both practitioners and researchers' attention to methodological approaches for secure IoT development. Security issues for IoT is special in the way that they include not only software, but also hardware and network concerns. With the aim at proposing a methodological approach for secure IoT application development, we investigated what are security challenges in the context of IoT development. We reviewed literature and investigated two industry cases. The preliminary finding results in a list of 17 security challenges with regards to technical, organizational and methodological perspectives. Cross-case comparison provides initial explanation about the less emphasis on methodological and organizational security concerns in our cases. © 2017 ACM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Keywords
Internetof-thing, IoT, Security challenge, Security method, Software engineering, Software security
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15312 (URN)10.1145/3120459.3120471 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029847065 (Scopus ID)9781450352642 (ISBN)
Conference
2017 XP Scientific Workshops, XP, Cologne
Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R., Wohlin, C., Petersen, K., Šmite, D. & Börstler, J. (2016). A method for investigating the quality of evolving object-oriented software using defects in global software development projects. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, 28(8), 622-641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A method for investigating the quality of evolving object-oriented software using defects in global software development projects
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, ISSN 2047-7473, E-ISSN 2047-7481, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 622-641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Global software development (GSD) projects can have distributed teams that work independently in different locations or team members that are dispersed. The various development settings in GSD can influence quality during product evolution. When evaluating quality using defects as a proxy, the development settings have to be taken into consideration. Objective: The aim is to provide a systematic method for supporting investigations of the implication of GSD contexts on defect data as a proxy for quality. Method: A method engineering approach was used to incrementally develop the proposed method. This was done through applying the method in multiple industrial contexts and then using lessons learned to refine and improve the method after application. Results: A measurement instrument and visualization was proposed incorporating an understanding of the release history and understanding of GSD contexts. Conclusion: The method can help with making accurate inferences about development settings because it includes details on collecting and aggregating data at a level that matches the development setting in a GSD context and involves practitioners at various phases of the investigation. Finally, the information that is produced from following the method can help practitioners make informed decisions when planning to develop software in comparable circumstances. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Computer software selection and evaluation; Copyrights; Defects; Software design, Defect analysis; Distributed software development; Global software development; Object oriented software; Software Evolution; Software Quality, Object oriented programming
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-12980 (URN)10.1002/smr.1788 (DOI)000388301300001 ()2-s2.0-84981275207 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R., Šmite, D. & Hessbo, E. (2016). Distributed Software Development in an Offshore Outsourcing Project: A Case Study of Source Code Evolution and Quality. Information and Software Technology, 72, 125-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributed Software Development in an Offshore Outsourcing Project: A Case Study of Source Code Evolution and Quality
2016 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 72, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Offshore outsourcing collaborations can result in distributed development, which has been linked to quality-related concerns. However, there are few studies that focus on the implication of distributed development on quality, and they report inconsistent findings using different proxies for quality. Thus, there is a need for more studies, as well as to identify useful proxies for certain distributed contexts. The presented empirical study was performed in a context that involved offshore outsourcing vendors in a multisite distributed development setting.

Objective: The aim of the study is to investigate how quality changes during evolution in a distributed development environment that incurs organizational changes in terms of number of companies involved.

Method: A case study approach is followed in the investigation. Only post-release defects are used as a proxy for external quality due to unreliable defect data found pre-release such as those reported during integration. Focus group meetings were also held with practitioners.

Results: The results suggest that practices that can be grouped into product, people, and process categories can help ensure post-release quality. However, post-release defects are insufficient for showing a conclusive impact on quality of the development setting. This is because the development teams worked independently as isolated distributed teams, and integration defects would help to better reflect on the impact on quality of the development setting.

Conclusions: The mitigation practices identified can be useful information to practitioners that are planning to engage in similar globally distributed development projects. Finally, it is important to take into consideration the arrangement of distributed development teams in global projects, and to use the context to identify appropriate proxies for quality in order to draw correct conclusions about the implications of the context. This would help with providing practitioners with well-founded findings about the impact on quality of globally distributed development settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Offshore Outsourcing; Distributed Development; Global Software Development; Software Quality; Case Study
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11449 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2015.12.005 (DOI)000384704500008 ()
Projects
Partially supported by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation in Sweden under the grant 20120200 (2013-2016) and Ericsson Software Research
Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R., Börstler, J., Šmite, D. & Wohlin, C. (2015). Empirical Evidence on the Link between Object-Oriented Measures and External Quality Attributes: A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, 20(3), 640-693
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empirical Evidence on the Link between Object-Oriented Measures and External Quality Attributes: A Systematic Literature Review
2015 (English)In: Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, ISSN 1382-3256, E-ISSN 1573-7616, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 640-693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a plethora of studies investigating object-oriented measures and their link with external quality attributes, but usefulness of the measures may differ across empirical studies. This study aims to aggregate and identify useful object-oriented measures, specifically those obtainable from the source code of object-oriented systems that have gone through such empirical evaluation. By conducting a systematic literature review, 99 primary studies were identified and traced to four external quality attributes: reliability, maintainability, effectiveness and functionality. A vote-counting approach was used to investigate the link be- tween object-oriented measures and the attributes, and to also assess the consistency of the relation reported across empirical studies. Most of the studies investigate links between object-oriented measures and proxies for reliability attributes, followed by proxies for maintainability. The least investigated attributes were: effectiveness and functionality. Measures from the C&K measurement suite were the most popular across studies. Vote-counting results suggest that complexity, cohesion, size and coupling measures have a better link with reliability and maintainability than inheritance measures. However, inheritance measures should not be overlooked during quality assessment initiatives; their link with reliability and maintainability could be context dependent. There were too few studies traced to effectiveness and functionality attributes; thus a meaningful vote-counting analysis could not be conducted for these attributes. Thus, there is a need for diversification of quality attributes investigated in empirical studies. This would help with identifying useful measures during quality assessment initiatives, and not just for reliability and maintainability aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
Keywords
Systematic literature review, Object-oriented system, Source code analysis, Source code measures, Software metrics, Software quality, Static analysis
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6633 (URN)10.1007/s10664-013-9291-7 (DOI)000354480800003 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo60DE7E41A209664BC1257C3B003D787B (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo60DE7E41A209664BC1257C3B003D787B (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo60DE7E41A209664BC1257C3B003D787B (OAI)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2014-07-18 Created: 2013-12-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R., Börstler, J. & Petersen, K. (2015). Handover of managerial responsibilities in global software development: a case study of source code evolution and quality. Software quality journal, 23(4), 539-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handover of managerial responsibilities in global software development: a case study of source code evolution and quality
2015 (English)In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 539-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies report on the negative effect on quality in global software development (GSD) due to communication and coordination-related challenges. However, empirical studies reporting on the magnitude of the effect are scarce. This paper presents findings from an embedded explanatory case study on the change in quality over time, across multiple releases, for products that were developed in a GSD setting. The GSD setting involved periods of distributed development between geographically dispersed sites as well as a handover of project management responsibilities between the involved sites. Investigations were performed on two medium-sized products from a company that is part of a large multinational corporation. Quality is investigated quantitatively using defect data and measures that quantify two source code properties, size and complexity. Observations were triangulated with subjective views from company representatives. There were no observable indications that the distribution of work or handover of project management responsibilities had an impact on quality on both products. Among the product-, process- and people-related success factors, we identified well-designed product architectures, early handover planning and support from the sending site to the receiving site after the handover and skilled employees at the involved sites. Overall, these results can be useful input for decision-makers who are considering distributing development work between globally dispersed sites or handing over project management responsibilities from one site to another. Moreover, our study shows that analyzing the evolution of size and complexity properties of a product’s source code can provide valuable information to support decision-making during similar projects. Finally, the strategy used by the company to relocate responsibilities can also be considered as an alternative for software transfers, which have been linked with a decline in efficiency, productivity and quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
Keywords
Global software development, Source code analysis, Object-oriented measures
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6536 (URN)10.1007/s11219-014-9247-1 (DOI)000363257000001 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfoC475735187F38EBDC1257D9600408746 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoC475735187F38EBDC1257D9600408746 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoC475735187F38EBDC1257D9600408746 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-11-20 Created: 2014-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R. (2015). Software Quality Evaluation for Evolving Systems in Distributed Development Environments. (Doctoral dissertation). Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Software Quality Evaluation for Evolving Systems in Distributed Development Environments
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Context: There is an overwhelming prevalence of companies developing software in global software development (GSD) contexts. The existing body of knowledge, however, falls short of providing comprehensive empirical evidence on the implication of GSD contexts on software quality for evolving software systems. Therefore there is limited evidence to support practitioners that need to make informed decisions about ongoing or future GSD projects. Objective: This thesis work seeks to explore changes in quality, as well as to gather confounding factors that influence quality, for software systems that evolve in GSD contexts. Method: The research work in this thesis includes empirical work that was performed through exploratory case studies. This involved analysis of quantitative data consisting of defects as an indicator for quality, and measures that capture software evolution, and qualitative data from company documentations, interviews, focus group meetings, and questionnaires. An extensive literature review was also performed to gather information that was used to support the empirical investigations. Results: Offshoring software development work, to a location that has employees with limited or no prior experience with the software product, as observed in software transfers, can have a negative impact on quality. Engaging in long periods of distributed development with an offshore site and eventually handing over all responsibilities to the offshore site can be an alternative to software transfers. This approach can alleviate a negative effect on quality. Finally, the studies highlight the importance of taking into account the GSD context when investigating quality for software that is developed in globally distributed environments. This helps with making valid inferences about the development settings in GSD projects in relation to quality. Conclusion: The empirical work presented in this thesis can be useful input for practitioners that are planning to develop software in globally distributed environments. For example, the insights on confounding factors or mitigation practices that are linked to quality in the empirical studies can be used as input to support decision-making processes when planning similar GSD projects. Consequently, lessons learned from the empirical investigations were used to formulate a method, GSD-QuID, for investigating quality using defects for evolving systems. The method is expected to help researchers avoid making incorrect inferences about the implications of GSD contexts on quality for evolving software systems, when using defects as a quality indicator. This in turn will benefit practitioners that need the information to make informed decisions for software that is developed in similar circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, 2015. p. 242
Series
Blekinge Institute of Technology Doctoral Dissertation Series, ISSN 1653-2090 ; 4
Keywords
Global software development, Distributed software development, Software transfer, Object-oriented measures, Software quality, Software evolution
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-00613 (URN)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4B139C1F679C7D5CC1257E2100518C46 (Local ID)978-91-7295-301-7 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4B139C1F679C7D5CC1257E2100518C46 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4B139C1F679C7D5CC1257E2100518C46 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Šmite, D., Wohlin, C., Aurum, A., Jabangwe, R. & Numminen, E. (2013). Offshore Insourcing in Software Development: Structuring the Decision-Making Process. Journal of Systems and Software, 86(4), 1054-1067
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Offshore Insourcing in Software Development: Structuring the Decision-Making Process
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 1054-1067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A variety of new forms of business are enabled through globalization and practiced by software organizations today. While companies go global to reduce their development costs, access a larger pool of resources and explore new markets, it is often assumed that the level of delivered services shall remain the same after implementing the sourcing decisions. In contrast, critical studies identified that global software development is associated with unique challenges, and a lot of global projects fail to mitigate the implications of a particular global setting. In this paper we explore offshore insourcing decisions on the basis of empirical research literature and an empirical field study conducted at Ericsson. By analyzing decisions in two different cases we found that each offshore insourcing decision consisted of deciding what, where, when, how and why to insource. Related empirical research and field observations suggest that not all combinations are successful and alignment between different decision points has thus a prominent role. To address these concerns we built an empirically-based insourcing decision structure, which outlines a logical path through the decision options and helps selecting an offshore insourcing strategy that targets creation of the necessary alignment. The key element of the proposed approach is a structured and well-defined decision-making process, which is intended to support managers in their decision-making. The usefulness of the proposed approach is evaluated in an additional empirical case of a new offshore insourcing decision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Global software development, Offshore insourcing, Sourcing, Go-global decisions, Empirical field study
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6808 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2012.10.003 (DOI)000316831700013 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo99B087A9F97192C1C1257AD20049A5BB (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo99B087A9F97192C1C1257AD20049A5BB (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo99B087A9F97192C1C1257AD20049A5BB (OAI)
Available from: 2013-12-17 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R. (2013). Understanding the Impact on Software Quality for Evolving Systems in Distributed Development Environments. (Licentiate dissertation). Karlskrona: Blekinge Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the Impact on Software Quality for Evolving Systems in Distributed Development Environments
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Context: The existing body of knowledge falls short of providing comprehensive empirical evidence on the impact that global software development (GSD) strategies have on software quality during software evolution. The realization of expected benefits of such GSD strategies, e.g. reduced costs, should not be taken for granted. Challenges faced can negatively impact quality, which can consequently inhibit the realization of the potential benefits. Objective: This licentiate thesis provides empirical evidence pertaining to the effect on quality for evolving systems in distributed development environments. The aim is to provide empirical evidence that can be useful input in the decision-making process for future GSD projects that are executed in distributed development environments. Method: The findings presented in this licentiate thesis are obtained from three empirical studies and one extensive systematic literature review. The empirical studies were conducted at two large multinational corporations. Meanwhile, the purpose of the systematic review was to obtain empirical information that was used to successfully execute one of the empirical studies. All empirical work was done using both quantitative data (e.g., defect data, features per release, source code measures, release history) and qualitative data (e.g., interviews, focus group meetings, questionnaires, and analysis of company documentations). Result: Transfers have a potentially negative impact on quality and efficiency. Observations that were made on quantitative data in all three empirical studies were triangulated with subjective opinions that were obtained from practitioners. When studying the quality of a large software system, a significant decrease in quality was identified; similarly in a study focusing on maintenance work efficiency two studied large software products showed a noticeable decrease. Meanwhile, there was no discernible impact on quality for two products, as a result of distributed development and the handover of responsibilities between involved sites. Transfer critical factors, which can impact quality, as well as transfer enabling factors, which can alleviate transfer-related issues, were also identified from these empirical studies. Conclusions: Companies that engage in software transfers should expect a decline in quality during and immediately after a transfer. There are practices, such as, engaging in distributed development, and the gradual handover of responsibilities, that can alleviate transfer-related issues. The findings in this licentiate thesis can be a valuable input in the decision-making process for companies engaging in transfers in GSD contexts, and thus help in making informed decisions in current or future transfers. Moreover, this licentiate thesis shows that analyzing the evolution of size and complexity properties of a product’s source code, and defect data, can also provide useful objective data to support decision-making during similar projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlskrona: Blekinge Institute of Technology, 2013. p. 170 p.
Series
Blekinge Institute of Technology Licentiate Dissertation Series, ISSN 1650-2140 ; 5
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-00557 (URN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDBB517332988987EC1257B590043A0C4 (Local ID)978-91-7295-256-0 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDBB517332988987EC1257B590043A0C4 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDBB517332988987EC1257B590043A0C4 (OAI)
Available from: 2013-06-11 Created: 2013-04-26 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R., Petersen, K. & Šmite, D. (2013). Visualization of Defect Inflow and Resolution Cycles: Before, During and After Transfer. In: Muenchaisri, P; Rothermel, G (Ed.), 2013 20TH ASIA-PACIFIC SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONFERENCE (APSEC 2013), VOL 1: . Paper presented at 20th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference (APSEC), Bangkok (pp. 289-298). IEEE Computer Society Press, 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of Defect Inflow and Resolution Cycles: Before, During and After Transfer
2013 (English)In: 2013 20TH ASIA-PACIFIC SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONFERENCE (APSEC 2013), VOL 1 / [ed] Muenchaisri, P; Rothermel, G, IEEE Computer Society Press , 2013, Vol. 1, p. 289-298Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The link between maintenance and product quality, as well as the high cost of software maintenance, highlights the importance of efficient maintenance processes. Sustaining maintenance work efficiency in a global software development setting that involves a transfer is a challenging endeavor. Studies report on the negative effect of transfers on efficiency. However, empirical evidence on the magnitude of the change in efficiency is scarce. In this study we used a lean indicator to visualize variances in defect resolution cycles for two large products during evolution, before, during and after a transfer. Focus group meetings were also held for each product. Study results show that during and immediately after the transfer the defect inflow is higher, bottlenecks are more visible, and defect resolution cycles are longer, as compared to before the transfer. Furthermore we highlight the factors that influenced the change in defect resolution cycles before, during, and after the transfer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society Press, 2013
Series
Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference, ISSN 1530-1362
Keywords
Global Software Development, Software Transfer, Maintenance flow, Efficiency, Lean
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6864 (URN)000358736600036 ()978-1-4799-2143-0 (ISBN)
Conference
20th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference (APSEC), Bangkok
Available from: 2013-10-28 Created: 2013-10-27 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jabangwe, R. & Šmite, D. (2012). An Exploratory Study of Software Evolution and Quality: Before, During and After a Transfer. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE). Porto Alegre, Brazil: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Exploratory Study of Software Evolution and Quality: Before, During and After a Transfer
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the light of globalization it is not uncommon that different teams from different locations get involved in the development of a software product during its evolution. However, empirical evidence that demonstrates the effect of changing team members on software quality is scarce. In this paper, we investigate quality of a software product, across subsequent software releases, that was first developed in one location of Ericsson, a large multinational corporation, then jointly with an offshore location of the same company, and finally transferred offshore. To get a better understanding multiple data sources are used in the analysis: qualitative data, consisting of interviews and documentation, and quantitative data, consisting of release history and defect statistics. Our findings confirm an initial decline in efficiency and quality after a transfer, and highlight the areas of concern for companies that are considering transferring their product development from experienced teams to those having limited or no previous engagement with the product.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Porto Alegre, Brazil: IEEE, 2012
Keywords
Global Software Development, Software transfer, Software evolution, Software quality, Empirical case study
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-7115 (URN)10.1109/ICGSE.2012.30 (DOI)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF780A72370FCD85FC1257AC5005A880F (Local ID)978-0-7695-4787-9 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF780A72370FCD85FC1257AC5005A880F (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF780A72370FCD85FC1257AC5005A880F (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE)
Note
2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE)Available from: 2012-12-06 Created: 2012-11-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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