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Petersen, Kai
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 85) Show all publications
Nurdiani, I., Börstler, J., Fricker, S. & Petersen, K. (2018). A Preliminary Checklist for Capturing Baseline Situations in Studying the Impacts of Agile Practices Introduction. In: International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg: . Paper presented at International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg. ACM Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Preliminary Checklist for Capturing Baseline Situations in Studying the Impacts of Agile Practices Introduction
2018 (English)In: International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg, ACM Publications, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To assess the benefits of introducing Agile practices, it is important

to get a clear understanding of the baseline situation, i.e. the situation

before their introduction. Without a clear baseline, we cannot

properly assess the extent of impacts, both positive and negative,

of introducing Agile practices. This paper provides a preliminary

guideline to help researchers in capturing and reporting baseline

situations. The guideline has been developed through the study of

literature and interviews with industry practitioners, and validated

by experts in academia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Publications, 2018
Keyword
Agile practices, checklist, baseline situation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16114 (URN)
Conference
International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Irshad, M., Petersen, K. & Poulding, S. (2018). A systematic literature review of software requirements reuse approaches. Information and Software Technology, 93(Jan), 223-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic literature review of software requirements reuse approaches
2018 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 93, no Jan, p. 223-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Early software reuse is considered as the most beneficial form of software reuse. Hence, previous research has focused on supporting the reuse of software requirements. Objective: This study aims to identify and investigate the current state of the art with respect to (a) what requirement reuse approaches have been proposed, (b) the methods used to evaluate the approaches, (c) the characteristics of the approaches, and (d) the quality of empirical studies on requirements reuse with respect to rigor and relevance. Method: We conducted a systematic review and a combination of snowball sampling and database search have been used to identify the studies. The rigor and relevance scoring rubric has been used to assess the quality of the empirical studies. Multiple researchers have been involved in each step to increase the reliability of the study. Results: Sixty-nine studies were identified that describe requirements reuse approaches. The majority of the approaches used structuring and matching of requirements as a method to support requirements reuse and text-based artefacts were commonly used as an input to these approaches. Further evaluation of the studies revealed that the majority of the approaches are not validated in the industry. The subset of empirical studies (22 in total) was analyzed for rigor and relevance and two studies achieved the maximum score for rigor and relevance based on the rubric. It was found that mostly text-based requirements reuse approaches were validated in the industry. Conclusion: From the review, it was found that a number of approaches already exist in literature, but many approaches are not validated in industry. The evaluation of rigor and relevance of empirical studies show that these do not contain details of context, validity threats, and the industrial settings, thus highlighting the need for the industrial evaluation of the approaches. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keyword
Artefact reuse, Relevance, Requirements reuse, Reusability, Rigor, Software requirements, Quality control, Requirements engineering, Search engines, Computer software reusability
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15356 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2017.09.009 (DOI)000414878200014 ()2-s2.0-85030849171 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

project "Professional Licentiate of Engineering Research School"

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Petersen, K., Badampudi, D., Ali Shah, S. M., Wnuk, K., Gorschek, T., Papatheocharous, E., . . . Cicchetti, A. (2018). Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 39(12), 237-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey
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2018 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, ISSN 0098-5589, E-ISSN 1939-3520, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 237-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The choice of which software component to use influences the success of a software system. Only a few empirical studies investigate how the choice of components is conducted in industrial practice. This is important to understand to tailor research solutions to the needs of the industry. Existing studies focus on the choice for off-the-shelf (OTS) components. It is, however, also important to understand the implications of the choice of alternative component sourcing options (CSOs), such as outsourcing versus the use of OTS. Previous research has shown that the choice has major implications on the development process as well as on the ability to evolve the system. The objective of this study is to explore how decision making took place in industry to choose among CSOs. Overall, 22 industrial cases have been studied through a case survey. The results show that the solutions specifically for CSO decisions are deterministic and based on optimization approaches. The non-deterministic solutions proposed for architectural group decision making appear to suit the CSO decision making in industry better. Interestingly, the final decision was perceived negatively in nine cases and positively in seven cases, while in the remaining cases it was perceived as neither positive nor negative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2018
Keyword
Decision making; in-house; COTS; OSS; outsourcing
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15909 (URN)10.1109/TSE.2017.2677909 (DOI)000427678400002 ()
Projects
ORION - Decision Support for Component-Based Software Engineering of Cyber-Physical Systems
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2018-02-20 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Ghazi, A. N., Petersen, K., Bjarnason, E. & Runeson, P. (2018). Levels of Exploration in Exploratory Testing: From Freestyle to Fully Scripted. IEEE Access
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of Exploration in Exploratory Testing: From Freestyle to Fully Scripted
2018 (English)In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Exploratory testing (ET) is a powerful and efficient way of testing software by integrating design, execution, and analysis of tests during a testing session. ET is often contrasted with scripted testing, and seen as a choice of either exploratory testing or not. In contrast, we pose that exploratory testing can be of varying degrees of exploration from fully exploratory to fully scripted. In line with this, we propose a scale for the degree of exploration and define five levels. In our classification, these levels of exploration correspond to the way test charters are defined. We have evaluated this classification through focus groups at four companies and identified factors that influence the choice of exploration level. The results show that the proposed levels of exploration are influenced by different factors such as ease to reproduce defects, better learning, verification of requirements, etc., and that the levels can be used as a guide to structure test charters. Our study also indicates that applying a combination of exploration levels can be beneficial in achieving effective testing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2018
Keyword
Exploratory testing, test charter, test mission, session-based test management, levels of exploration, exploratory testing classification, software testing.
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16158 (URN)10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2834957 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Papatheocharous, E., Wnuk, K., Petersen, K., Sentilles, S., Cicchetti, A., Gorschek, T. & Shah, S. M. (2018). The GRADE taxonomy for supporting decision making asset selection in software-intensive system development. Information and Software Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The GRADE taxonomy for supporting decision making asset selection in software-intensive system development
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2018 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Context: The development of software-intensive systems includes many decisions involving various stakeholders with often conflicting interests and viewpoints. Objective: Decisions are rarely systematically documented and sporadically explored. This limits the opportunity for learning and improving on important decisions made in the development of software-intensive systems. Method: In this work, we enable support for the systematic documentation of decisions, improve their traceability and contribute to potentially improved decision-making in strategic, tactical and operational contexts. Results: We constructed a taxonomy for documentation supporting decision-making, called GRADE. GRADE was developed in a research project that required composition of a common dedicated language to make feasible the identification of new opportunities for better decision support and evaluation of multiple decision alternatives. The use of the taxonomy has been validated through thirty three decision cases from industry. Conclusion: This paper occupies this important yet greatly unexplored research gap by developing the GRADE taxonomy that serves as a common vocabulary to describe and classify decision-making with respect to architectural assets. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2018
Keyword
Decision-making, Knowledge management, Software engineering, Taxonomy, Decision support systems, Software design, Taxonomies, Classify decision makings, Decision supports, Software intensive systems, Decision making
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16171 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2018.02.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046163169 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Usman, M., Börstler, J. & Petersen, K. (2017). An Effort Estimation Taxonomy for Agile Software Development. International journal of software engineering and knowledge engineering, 27(4), 641-674
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Effort Estimation Taxonomy for Agile Software Development
2017 (English)In: International journal of software engineering and knowledge engineering, ISSN 0218-1940, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 641-674Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Agile Software Development (ASD) effort estimation plays an important role during release and iteration planning. The state of the art and practice on effort estimation in ASD have been recently identified. However, this knowledge has not yet been organized. The aim of this study is twofold: (1) To organize the knowledge on effort estimation in ASD and (2) to use this organized knowledge to support practice and the future research on effort estimation in ASD. We applied a taxonomy design method to organize the identified knowledge as a taxonomy of effort estimation in ASD. The proposed taxonomy offers a faceted classification scheme to characterize estimation activities of agile projects. Our agile estimation taxonomy consists of four dimensions: estimation context, estimation technique, effort predictors and effort estimate. Each dimension in turn has several facets. We applied the taxonomy to characterize estimation activities of 10 agile projects identified from the literature to assess whether all important estimation-related aspects are reported. The results showed that studies do not report complete information related to estimation. The taxonomy was also used to characterize the estimation activities of four agile teams from three different software companies. The practitioners involved in the investigation found the taxonomy useful in characterizing and documenting the estimation sessions. © 2017 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd, 2017
Keyword
agile software development, Effort estimation, taxonomy, Iterative methods, Software design, Taxonomies, Complete information, Effort estimates, Estimation techniques, Faceted Classification, Iteration planning, Software company, Software engineering
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14472 (URN)10.1142/S0218194017500243 (DOI)000402062200006 ()2-s2.0-85019610980 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
Ghazi, A. N., Garigapati, R. P. & Petersen, K. (2017). Checklists to Support Test Charter Design in Exploratory Testing. In: Baumeister H., Lichter H., Riebisch M. (Ed.), Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming: . Paper presented at 18th International Conference on Agile Software Development. XP 2017 (pp. 251-258). Springer, 283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Checklists to Support Test Charter Design in Exploratory Testing
2017 (English)In: Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming / [ed] Baumeister H., Lichter H., Riebisch M., Springer, 2017, Vol. 283, p. 251-258Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During exploratory testing sessions the tester simultaneously learns, designs and executes tests. The activity is iterative and utilizes the skills of the tester and provides flexibility and creativity. Test charters are used as a vehicle to support the testers during the testing. The aim of this study is to support practitioners in the design of test charters through checklists. We aimed to identify factors allowing practitioners to critically reflect on their designs and contents of test charters to support practitioners in making informed decisions of what to include in test charters. The factors and contents have been elicited through interviews. Overall, 30 factors and 35 content elements have been elicited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348 ; 283
Keyword
Software Testing, Exploratory Testing, SBTM, Session based test management, Test Charter, Test Mission
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14123 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-57633-6_17 (DOI)000426186600017 ()9783319576329 (ISBN)
Conference
18th International Conference on Agile Software Development. XP 2017
Note

open access

Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Minhas, N. M., Petersen, K., Ali, N. b. & Wnuk, K. (2017). Regression testing goals: View of practitioners and researchers. In: 24th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference Workshops (APSECW): . Paper presented at 24th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference, Nanjing (pp. 25-32). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regression testing goals: View of practitioners and researchers
2017 (English)In: 24th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference Workshops (APSECW), IEEE, 2017, p. 25-32Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Context: Regression testing is a well-researched area. However, the majority regression testing techniques proposed by the researchers are not getting the attention of the practitioners. Communication gaps between industry and academia and disparity in the regression testing goals are the main reasons. Close collaboration can help in bridging the communication gaps and resolving the disparities.Objective: The study aims at exploring the views of academics and practitioners about the goals of regression testing. The purpose is to investigate the commonalities and differences in their viewpoints and defining some common goals for the success of regression testing.Method: We conducted a focus group study, with 7 testing experts from industry and academia. 4 testing practitioners from 2companies and 3 researchers from 2 universities participated in the study. We followed GQM approach, to elicit the regression testing goals, information needs, and measures.Results: 43 regression testing goals were identified by the participants, which were reduced to 10 on the basis of similarity among the identified goals. Later during the priority assignment process, 5 goals were discarded, because the priority assigned to these goals was very low. Participants identified 47 information needs/questions required to evaluate the success of regression testing with reference to goal G5 (confidence). Which were then reduced to10 on the basis of similarity. Finally, we identified measures to gauge those information needs/questions, which were corresponding to the goal (G5).Conclusions: We observed that participation level of practitioners and researchers during the elicitation of goals and questions was same. We found a certain level of agreement between the participants regarding the regression testing definitions and goals.But there was some level of disagreement regarding the priorities of the goals. We also identified the need to implement a regression testing evaluation framework in the participating companies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2017
Keyword
Regression testing, Regression testing goals, GQM, Focus group
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16009 (URN)10.1109/APSECW.2017.23 (DOI)000428319200008 ()978-1-5386-2649-8 (ISBN)
Conference
24th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference, Nanjing
Projects
EASE (Embedded Applications Software Engineering, ease.cs.lth.se)
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-04-12Bibliographically approved
Engström, E., Petersen, K., Ali, N. & Bjarnason, E. (2017). SERP-test: a taxonomy for supporting industry-academia communication. Software quality journal, 25(4), 1269-1305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SERP-test: a taxonomy for supporting industry-academia communication
2017 (English)In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1269-1305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the construction and evaluation of SERP-test, a taxonomy aimed to improve communication between researchers and practitioners in the area of software testing. SERP-test can be utilized for direct communication in industry academia collaborations. It may also facilitate indirect communication between practitioners adopting software engineering research and researchers who are striving for industry relevance. SERP-test was constructed through a systematic and goal-oriented approach which included literature reviews and interviews with practitioners and researchers. SERP-test was evaluated through an online survey and by utilizing it in an industry–academia collaboration project. SERP-test comprises four facets along which both research contributions and practical challenges may be classified: Intervention, Scope, Effect target and Context constraints. This paper explains the available categories for each of these facets (i.e., their definitions and rationales) and presents examples of categorized entities. Several tasks may benefit from SERP-test, such as formulating research goals from a problem perspective, describing practical challenges in a researchable fashion, analyzing primary studies in a literature review, or identifying relevant points of comparison and generalization of research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2017
Keyword
Classification (of information); Software engineering; Taxonomies; Testing, Context; Industry relevance; Intervention; Methodology; Scope, Software testing
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13103 (URN)10.1007/s11219-016-9322-x (DOI)000415973100007 ()2-s2.0-84976367380 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Oliinyk, O., Petersen, K., Schoelzke, M., Becker, M. & Schneickert, S. (2017). Structuring automotive product lines and feature models: an exploratory study at Opel. Requirements Engineering, 22, 105-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structuring automotive product lines and feature models: an exploratory study at Opel
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2017 (English)In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, E-ISSN 1432-010X, Vol. 22, p. 105-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Automotive systems are highly complex and customized systems containing a vast amount of variability. Feature modeling plays a key role in customization. Empirical evidence through industry application, and in particular methodological guidance of how to structure automotive product lines and their feature models is needed. The overall aim of this work is to provide guidance to practitioners how to structure automotive product lines and their feature models, understanding strengths and weaknesses of alternative structures. The research was conducted in three phases. In the first phase, the context situation was understood using interviews and workshops. In the second phase, possible structures of product lines and feature models were evaluated based on industry feedback collected in workshops. In the third phase, the structures were implemented in the tool GEARS and practitioner feedback was collected. One key challenge was the unavailability of structuring guidelines, which was the focus of this research. The structures considered most suitable for the automotive product line were multiple product lines with modular decomposition. The structures most suitable for the feature model were functional decomposition, using context variability, models corresponding to assets, and feature categories. Other structures have been discarded, and the rationales have been presented. It was possible to support the most suitable structures with the commercial tool GEARS. The implementation in GEARS and the feedback from the practitioners provide early indications for the potential usefulness of the structures and the tool implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keyword
Requirements engineering; Software engineering Automotive; Empirical; Feature modeling; Product line engineering; Variability model
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-10715 (URN)10.1007/s00766-015-0237-z (DOI)000394464600005 ()
Available from: 2015-09-21 Created: 2015-09-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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