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Petersen, Kai
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Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Nurdiani, I., Börstler, J., Fricker, S. & Petersen, K. (2018). A Preliminary Checklist for Capturing Baseline Situations in Studying the Impacts of Agile Practices Introduction. In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering: . Paper presented at International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg (pp. 25-28). IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Preliminary Checklist for Capturing Baseline Situations in Studying the Impacts of Agile Practices Introduction
2018 (English)In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer Society, 2018, p. 25-28Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To assess the benefits of introducing Agile practices, it is important to get a clear understanding of the baseline situation, i.e. the situation before their introduction. Without a clear baseline, we cannot properly assess the extent of impacts, both positive and negative, of introducing Agile practices. This paper provides a preliminary guideline to help researchers in capturing and reporting baseline situations. The guideline has been developed through the study of literature and interviews with industry practitioners, and validated by experts in academia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2018
Series
Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering, ISSN 0270-5257
Keywords
Agile practices, checklist, baseline situation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16114 (URN)10.1145/3193965.3193969 (DOI)9781450357364 (ISBN)
Conference
International Workshop Series on Conducting Empirical Studies in Industry (CESI’18), Gothenburg
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Irshad, M., Petersen, K. & Poulding, S. (2018). A systematic literature review of software requirements reuse approaches. Information and Software Technology, 93(Jan), 223-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic literature review of software requirements reuse approaches
2018 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 93, no Jan, p. 223-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Early software reuse is considered as the most beneficial form of software reuse. Hence, previous research has focused on supporting the reuse of software requirements. Objective: This study aims to identify and investigate the current state of the art with respect to (a) what requirement reuse approaches have been proposed, (b) the methods used to evaluate the approaches, (c) the characteristics of the approaches, and (d) the quality of empirical studies on requirements reuse with respect to rigor and relevance. Method: We conducted a systematic review and a combination of snowball sampling and database search have been used to identify the studies. The rigor and relevance scoring rubric has been used to assess the quality of the empirical studies. Multiple researchers have been involved in each step to increase the reliability of the study. Results: Sixty-nine studies were identified that describe requirements reuse approaches. The majority of the approaches used structuring and matching of requirements as a method to support requirements reuse and text-based artefacts were commonly used as an input to these approaches. Further evaluation of the studies revealed that the majority of the approaches are not validated in the industry. The subset of empirical studies (22 in total) was analyzed for rigor and relevance and two studies achieved the maximum score for rigor and relevance based on the rubric. It was found that mostly text-based requirements reuse approaches were validated in the industry. Conclusion: From the review, it was found that a number of approaches already exist in literature, but many approaches are not validated in industry. The evaluation of rigor and relevance of empirical studies show that these do not contain details of context, validity threats, and the industrial settings, thus highlighting the need for the industrial evaluation of the approaches. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Artefact reuse, Relevance, Requirements reuse, Reusability, Rigor, Software requirements, Quality control, Requirements engineering, Search engines, Computer software reusability
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15356 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2017.09.009 (DOI)000414878200014 ()2-s2.0-85030849171 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

project "Professional Licentiate of Engineering Research School"

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Petersen, K., Badampudi, D., Ali Shah, S. M., Wnuk, K., Gorschek, T., Papatheocharous, E., . . . Cicchetti, A. (2018). Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 39(12), 237-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey
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2018 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, ISSN 0098-5589, E-ISSN 1939-3520, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 237-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The choice of which software component to use influences the success of a software system. Only a few empirical studies investigate how the choice of components is conducted in industrial practice. This is important to understand to tailor research solutions to the needs of the industry. Existing studies focus on the choice for off-the-shelf (OTS) components. It is, however, also important to understand the implications of the choice of alternative component sourcing options (CSOs), such as outsourcing versus the use of OTS. Previous research has shown that the choice has major implications on the development process as well as on the ability to evolve the system. The objective of this study is to explore how decision making took place in industry to choose among CSOs. Overall, 22 industrial cases have been studied through a case survey. The results show that the solutions specifically for CSO decisions are deterministic and based on optimization approaches. The non-deterministic solutions proposed for architectural group decision making appear to suit the CSO decision making in industry better. Interestingly, the final decision was perceived negatively in nine cases and positively in seven cases, while in the remaining cases it was perceived as neither positive nor negative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2018
Keywords
Decision making; in-house; COTS; OSS; outsourcing
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15909 (URN)10.1109/TSE.2017.2677909 (DOI)000427678400002 ()
Projects
ORION - Decision Support for Component-Based Software Engineering of Cyber-Physical Systems
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2018-02-20 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Ghazi, A. N., Petersen, K., Bjarnason, E. & Runeson, P. (2018). Levels of Exploration in Exploratory Testing: From Freestyle to Fully Scripted. IEEE Access, 6, 26416-26423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of Exploration in Exploratory Testing: From Freestyle to Fully Scripted
2018 (English)In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 6, p. 26416-26423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploratory testing (ET) is a powerful and efficient way of testing software by integrating design, execution, and analysis of tests during a testing session. ET is often contrasted with scripted testing, and seen as a choice of either exploratory testing or not. In contrast, we pose that exploratory testing can be of varying degrees of exploration from fully exploratory to fully scripted. In line with this, we propose a scale for the degree of exploration and define five levels. In our classification, these levels of exploration correspond to the way test charters are defined. We have evaluated this classification through focus groups at four companies and identified factors that influence the choice of exploration level. The results show that the proposed levels of exploration are influenced by different factors such as ease to reproduce defects, better learning, verification of requirements, etc., and that the levels can be used as a guide to structure test charters. Our study also indicates that applying a combination of exploration levels can be beneficial in achieving effective testing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2018
Keywords
Exploratory testing, test charter, test mission, session-based test management, levels of exploration, exploratory testing classification, software testing.
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16158 (URN)10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2834957 (DOI)000434695100001 ()
Note

open access

Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Molléri, J. S., Ali, N. b., Petersen, K., Minhas, T. N. & Chatzipetrou, P. (2018). Teaching students critical appraisal of scientific literature using checklists. In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: . Paper presented at 3rd European Conference of Software Engineering Education, ECSEE, Seeon Monastery, Germany (pp. 8-17). Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching students critical appraisal of scientific literature using checklists
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2018 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, p. 8-17Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Teaching students to critically appraise scientific literature is an important goal for a postgraduate research methods course. Objective: To investigate the application of checklists for assessing the scientific rigor of empirical studies support students in reviewing case study research and experiments. Methods:We employed an experimental design where 76 students (in pairs) used two checklists to evaluate two papers (reporting a case study and an experiment) each. We compared the students' assessments against ratings from more senior researchers. We also collected data on students' perception of using the checklists. Results: The consistency of students' ratings and the accuracy when compared to ratings from seniors varied. A factor seemed to be that the clearer the reporting, the easier it is for students to judge the quality of studies. Students perceived checklist items related to data analysis as difficult to assess. Conclusion: As expected, this study reinforces the needs for clear reporting, as it is important that authors write to enable synthesis and quality assessment. With clearer reporting, the novices performed well in assessing the quality of the empirical work, which supports its continued use in the course as means for introducing scientific reviews. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2018
Keywords
Case study, Checklist, Critical appraisal, Experiment, Student, Design of experiments, Engineering education, Experiments, Software engineering, Teaching, Case study research, Continued use, Empirical studies, Post-graduate research, Quality assessment, Scientific literature, Students
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16892 (URN)10.1145/3209087.3209099 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049867400 (Scopus ID)9781450363839 (ISBN)
Conference
3rd European Conference of Software Engineering Education, ECSEE, Seeon Monastery, Germany
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Papatheocharous, E., Wnuk, K., Petersen, K., Sentilles, S., Cicchetti, A., Gorschek, T. & Shah, S. M. (2018). The GRADE taxonomy for supporting decision making asset selection in software-intensive system development. Information and Software Technology, 100, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The GRADE taxonomy for supporting decision making asset selection in software-intensive system development
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2018 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 100, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: The development of software-intensive systems includes many decisions involving various stakeholders with often conflicting interests and viewpoints. Objective: Decisions are rarely systematically documented and sporadically explored. This limits the opportunity for learning and improving on important decisions made in the development of software-intensive systems. Method: In this work, we enable support for the systematic documentation of decisions, improve their traceability and contribute to potentially improved decision-making in strategic, tactical and operational contexts. Results: We constructed a taxonomy for documentation supporting decision-making, called GRADE. GRADE was developed in a research project that required composition of a common dedicated language to make feasible the identification of new opportunities for better decision support and evaluation of multiple decision alternatives. The use of the taxonomy has been validated through thirty three decision cases from industry. Conclusion: This paper occupies this important yet greatly unexplored research gap by developing the GRADE taxonomy that serves as a common vocabulary to describe and classify decision-making with respect to architectural assets. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2018
Keywords
Decision-making, Knowledge management, Software engineering, Taxonomy, Decision support systems, Software design, Taxonomies, Classify decision makings, Decision supports, Software intensive systems, Decision making
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16171 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2018.02.007 (DOI)000435056100001 ()2-s2.0-85046163169 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Jabbari, R., Ali, N. b., Petersen, K. & Tanveer, B. (2018). Towards a benefits dependency network for DevOps based on a systematic literature review. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a benefits dependency network for DevOps based on a systematic literature review
2018 (English)In: Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, ISSN 2047-7473, E-ISSN 2047-7481Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

DevOps as a new way of thinking for software development and operations has received much attention in the industry, while it has not been thoroughly investigated in academia yet. The objective of this study is to characterize DevOps by exploring its central components in terms of principles, practices and their relations to the principles, challenges of DevOps adoption, and benefits reported in the peer-reviewed literature. As a key objective, we also aim to realize the relations between DevOps practices and benefits in a systematic manner. A systematic literature review was conducted. Also, we used the concept of benefits dependency network to synthesize the findings, in particular, to specify dependencies between DevOps practices and link the practices to benefits. We found that in many cases, DevOps characteristics, ie, principles, practices, benefits, and challenges, were not sufficiently defined in detail in the peer-reviewed literature. In addition, only a few empirical studies are available, which can be attributed to the nascency of DevOps research. Also, an initial version of the DevOps benefits dependency network has been derived. The definition of DevOps principles and practices should be emphasized given the novelty of the concept. Further empirical studies are needed to improve the benefits dependency network presented in this study. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Benefits and values, Challenges, Development and operations, DevOps, Principles and practices, Systematic literature review, Computer software, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16924 (URN)10.1002/smr.1957 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050720397 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Nurdiani, I., Börstler, J., Fricker, S. & Petersen, K. (2018). Usage, Retention, and Abandonment of Agile Practices. e-Informatica Software Engineering Journal, 3(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Usage, Retention, and Abandonment of Agile Practices
2018 (English)In: e-Informatica Software Engineering Journal, ISSN 1897-7979, E-ISSN 2084-4840, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16236 (URN)
Note

Background: A number of Agile maturity models (AMMs) have been proposed to guide software organizations in their adoption of Agile practices. Typically the AMMs suggest that higher maturity levels are reached by gradually adding more practices. However, recent research indicates that certain Agile practices, like test-driven development and continuous integration are being abandoned. Little is known on the rationales for abandoning Agile practices. Aim: We aim to identify which Agile practices are abandoned in industry, as well as the reasons for abandoning them. Method: We conducted a web survey with 51 respondents and interviews with 11 industry practitioners with experience in Agile adoption to investigate why Agile practices are abandoned. Results: Of the 17 Agile practices that were included in the survey, all have been abandoned at some point. Nevertheless, respondents who retained all practices as well as those who abandoned one or more practices, perceived their overall adoption of Agile practices as successful. Conclusion: Going against the suggestions of the AMMs, i.e. abandoning Agile one or more practices, could still lead to successful outcomes. This indicates that introducing Agile practices gradually in a certain sequence, as the AMMs suggest, may not always be suitable in different contexts.

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Usman, M., Börstler, J. & Petersen, K. (2017). An Effort Estimation Taxonomy for Agile Software Development. International journal of software engineering and knowledge engineering, 27(4), 641-674
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Effort Estimation Taxonomy for Agile Software Development
2017 (English)In: International journal of software engineering and knowledge engineering, ISSN 0218-1940, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 641-674Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Agile Software Development (ASD) effort estimation plays an important role during release and iteration planning. The state of the art and practice on effort estimation in ASD have been recently identified. However, this knowledge has not yet been organized. The aim of this study is twofold: (1) To organize the knowledge on effort estimation in ASD and (2) to use this organized knowledge to support practice and the future research on effort estimation in ASD. We applied a taxonomy design method to organize the identified knowledge as a taxonomy of effort estimation in ASD. The proposed taxonomy offers a faceted classification scheme to characterize estimation activities of agile projects. Our agile estimation taxonomy consists of four dimensions: estimation context, estimation technique, effort predictors and effort estimate. Each dimension in turn has several facets. We applied the taxonomy to characterize estimation activities of 10 agile projects identified from the literature to assess whether all important estimation-related aspects are reported. The results showed that studies do not report complete information related to estimation. The taxonomy was also used to characterize the estimation activities of four agile teams from three different software companies. The practitioners involved in the investigation found the taxonomy useful in characterizing and documenting the estimation sessions. © 2017 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd, 2017
Keywords
agile software development, Effort estimation, taxonomy, Iterative methods, Software design, Taxonomies, Complete information, Effort estimates, Estimation techniques, Faceted Classification, Iteration planning, Software company, Software engineering
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14472 (URN)10.1142/S0218194017500243 (DOI)000402062200006 ()2-s2.0-85019610980 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
Ghazi, A. N., Garigapati, R. P. & Petersen, K. (2017). Checklists to Support Test Charter Design in Exploratory Testing. In: Baumeister H., Lichter H., Riebisch M. (Ed.), Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming: . Paper presented at 18th International Conference on Agile Software Development. XP 2017 (pp. 251-258). Springer, 283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Checklists to Support Test Charter Design in Exploratory Testing
2017 (English)In: Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming / [ed] Baumeister H., Lichter H., Riebisch M., Springer, 2017, Vol. 283, p. 251-258Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During exploratory testing sessions the tester simultaneously learns, designs and executes tests. The activity is iterative and utilizes the skills of the tester and provides flexibility and creativity. Test charters are used as a vehicle to support the testers during the testing. The aim of this study is to support practitioners in the design of test charters through checklists. We aimed to identify factors allowing practitioners to critically reflect on their designs and contents of test charters to support practitioners in making informed decisions of what to include in test charters. The factors and contents have been elicited through interviews. Overall, 30 factors and 35 content elements have been elicited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348 ; 283
Keywords
Software Testing, Exploratory Testing, SBTM, Session based test management, Test Charter, Test Mission
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14123 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-57633-6_17 (DOI)000426186600017 ()9783319576329 (ISBN)
Conference
18th International Conference on Agile Software Development. XP 2017
Note

open access

Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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