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Tavassoli, Sam
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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Karlsson, C. & Tavassoli, S. (2016). Innovation Strategies and Firm Performance: Simple or Complex Strategies?. Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 25(7), 631-650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation Strategies and Firm Performance: Simple or Complex Strategies?
2016 (English)In: Economics of Innovation and New Technology, ISSN 1043-8599, E-ISSN 1476-8364, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 631-650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the effect of various innovation strategies (ISs) of firms on their future performance, captured by labor productivity. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a decade, that is, from 2002 to 2012. We defined ISs to be either simple or complex (in various degrees). We call an IS a simple IS when firms engage in only one of the four types of Schumpeterian innovations, that is, product, process, marketing, or organizational, while a complex IS is when firms simultaneously engage in more than one type. The main findings indicate that those firms that choose and afford to have complex ISs are better off in terms of their future productivity in comparison with those firms that choose not to innovative (base group) and also in comparison with those firms that choose simple ISs. The results are mostly robust for those complex innovators that have a higher degree of complexity and also keep the balance between technological (product and process) and non-technological (organizational and marketing) innovations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Community Innovation Survey; complex; firm level; firm performance; Innovation strategy; panel; productivity; simple
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11701 (URN)10.1080/10438599.2015.1108109 (DOI)000410576000001 ()
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, C. & Tavassoli, S. (2016). Innovation Strategies of Firms: What Strategies and Why?. Journal of Technology Transfer, 41(6), 1483-1506
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation Strategies of Firms: What Strategies and Why?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Technology Transfer, ISSN 0892-9912, E-ISSN 1573-7047, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1483-1506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes various innovation strategies of firms. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a 10-year period, i.e. between 2002 and 2012. We distinguish between sixteen innovation strategies, which compose of Schumpeterian four types of innovations (process, product, marketing, and organizational) plus various combinations of these four types. First, we find that firms are not homogenous in choosing innovation strategies, instead, they have a wide range of preferences when it comes to innovation strategy and some of the innovation strategies are “commonly” used among firms. Second, using Transition Probability Matrix, we found that firms also persist to have such a diverse innovation strategy preferences. Finally, using Multinomial Logit model, we explained the determinant of each and every innovation strategies, while we gave special attention to the commonly used innovation strategies among firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Community Innovation Survey; Innovation strategy; Marketing innovations; Organizational innovations; Process innovations; Product innovations
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11700 (URN)10.1007/s10961-015-9453-4 (DOI)000387231700012 ()
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Kianian, B., Tavassoli, S., Larsson, T. C. & Diegel, O. (2016). The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden. In: 13TH GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING - DECOUPLING GROWTH FROM RESOURCE USE: . Paper presented at 13th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing - Decoupling Growth from Resource Use, SEP 16-18, 2015, Binh Dong New City, VIETNAM (pp. 7-12).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden
2016 (English)In: 13TH GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING - DECOUPLING GROWTH FROM RESOURCE USE, 2016, p. 7-12Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the adoption of Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies in Sweden. The dataset consists of a recent and representative sample of Swedish AM users (companies, universities, and research institutes). The authors investigate two questions. Firstly, what are the current applications of AM in Sweden (e.g. Rapid Prototyping (RP), production)? Secondly, what are the factors that can explain the variation in AM adoption among the users? Using a regression analysis technique, the main findings are as follows. (i) There is a variation among users' choice of AM application, and the majority of users are expanding their AM applications beyond RP. (ii) There are two factors that positively affect the decision of firms to expand classical RP and also incorporate production and management. These two factors are using multiple AM technologies (as opposed to single Fused Deposition Modeling technology) and being small companies. The authors discuss the implication of these results. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Series
Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271 ; 40
Keywords
Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing, Application, Production Technology, Sweden
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-12962 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.01.036 (DOI)000379243200002 ()
Conference
13th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing - Decoupling Growth from Resource Use, SEP 16-18, 2015, Binh Dong New City, VIETNAM
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-30 Last updated: 2017-03-16Bibliographically approved
Tavassoli, S. (2015). Innovation determinants over industry life cycle. Technological forecasting & social change, 91, 18-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation determinants over industry life cycle
2015 (English)In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 91, p. 18-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes how the influence of firm-level innovation determinants varies over the industry life cycle. Two sets of determinants are distinguished: (1) determinants of a firm's innovation propensity, i.e. the likelihood of being innovative and (2) determinants of its innovation intensity, i.e. innovation sales. By combining the literature emphasizing firms' internal resources (micro-level) with the research strand on the role of the industry context (meso-level), the paper develops hypotheses about the relative importance of firm-level innovation determinants over the industry life cycle. Estimation of a firm-level model of innovation in Sweden, while acknowledging the stage of the life cycle of the industry a firm belongs to, shows that the importance of the determinants of innovation propensity and intensity is not equal over the stages of an industry's life cycle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Community Innovation Survey (CIS4), Determinants of innovation, Industry life cycle (ILC), Innovation intensity, Innovation propensity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6323 (URN)10.1016/j.techfore.2013.12.027 (DOI)000348958900002 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo427716A4252B416EC1257CB4004CE851 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo427716A4252B416EC1257CB4004CE851 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo427716A4252B416EC1257CB4004CE851 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2014-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Tavassoli, S. & Karlsson, C. (2015). Persistence of various types of innovation analyzed and explained. Research Policy, 44(10), 1887-1901
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persistence of various types of innovation analyzed and explained
2015 (English)In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1887-1901Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the persistency in innovation behavior of firms. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behavior of firms over a ten-year period, i.e., between 2002 and 2012. We distinguish between four types of innovations: process, product, marketing, and organizational innovations. First, using transition probability matrix, we found evidence of (unconditional) state dependence in all types of innovation, with product innovators having the strongest persistent behavior. Second, using a dynamic probit model, we found evidence of "true" state dependency among all types of innovations, except marketing innovators. Once again, the strongest persistency was found for product innovators. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Persistence; Innovation; Product innovations; Process innovations; Marketing innovations; Organizational innovations; State dependence; Heterogeneity; Firms; Community Innovation Survey
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11172 (URN)10.1016/j.respol.2015.06.001 (DOI)000364620700008 ()
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Kianian, B., Tavassoli, S., Larsson, T. & Diegel, O. (2015). The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden. 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, 2(4), 152-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden
2015 (English)In: 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, ISSN 2329-7662, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyzes the adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies in Sweden. The data set consists of a recent and representative sample of Swedish AM users (companies, universities, and research institutes). The authors investigate two questions. First, what are the current applications of AM in Sweden (e.g., rapid prototyping [RP], production)? Second, what are the factors that can explain the variation in AM adoption among the users? Using a regression analysis technique, the main findings are as follows. (i) There is a variation among users' choice of AM application, and the majority of users are expanding their AM applications beyond RP. (ii) There are two factors that positively affect the decision of firms to expand classical RP and incorporate production and management as well. These two factors are using multiple AM technologies (as opposed to single fused deposition modeling technology) being small companies. The authors discuss the implication of these results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2015
Keywords
3D printing, additive manufacturing, adoption
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11342 (URN)10.1089/3dp.2015.0013 (DOI)
Projects
Model Driven Development and Decision Support
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2017-03-17Bibliographically approved
Kianian, B., Tavassoli, S. & Larsson, T. C. (2015). The Role of Additive Manufacturing Technology in job creation: an exploratory case study of suppliers of Additive Manufacturing in Sweden. In: Procedia CIRP: . Paper presented at 12th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing - Emerging Potentials, Johor Bahru, MALAYSIA,SEP 22-24, 2014 (pp. 93-98). Elsevier, 26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Additive Manufacturing Technology in job creation: an exploratory case study of suppliers of Additive Manufacturing in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier , 2015, Vol. 26, p. 93-98Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

his paper investigates how Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies, as a process innovation, may contribute to a job creation. Further, the various mechanisms in which AM may contribute to an increase in job creation as well as the types of jobs are analyzed. The analysis also goes beyond AM technologies and incorporates other non-technological factors which foster job creation, i.e. higher wages in BRIC countries, lower quality in BRIC countries, and a rising demand for western-made products. The analysis is based on a case study and the data collected was through interviews with three prominent actors within the AM technologies field in Sweden: technology developers, leading suppliers and users. The main findings indicate that AM (i) contributes to job creation in both the manufacturing sector and in the service sector, (ii) does not bring back mass production jobs from emerging economies such as BRIC, (iii) contributes to job creation in product development stages (e.g. rapid prototyping), and (iv) contributes to job creation in production stages of low-volume batches mainly of complex products. The findings also suggest there are barriers for full exploitation of AM in several areas, including education systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Series
Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271
Keywords
Additive Manufacturing Technologies, job creation, 3D printing, exploratory case study, Sweden
National Category
Economics Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6532 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2014.07.109 (DOI)000360931800017 ()
External cooperation:
Conference
12th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing - Emerging Potentials, Johor Bahru, MALAYSIA,SEP 22-24, 2014
Available from: 2014-11-21 Created: 2014-11-20 Last updated: 2016-09-01Bibliographically approved
Tavasolli, S. & Tsagdis, D. (2014). Critical success factors and cluster evolution: A case study of the Linköping ICT cluster lifecycle. Environment and planning A, 46(6), 1425-1444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical success factors and cluster evolution: A case study of the Linköping ICT cluster lifecycle
2014 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1425-1444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the variation in the importance of critical success factors (CSFs) in the evolution of the Linköping ICT (information and communication technology) cluster in Sweden. The international empirical evidence of CSFs in ICT clusters reported in the literature is systematically reviewed. On this basis an object-oriented conceptual model is developed encompassing fifteen CSFs; each attributed to one or more objects: for example, firms, institutions, entrepreneurs. The lifecycle of the Linköping ICT cluster is delineated and its stages segmented. The existence and importance of each CSF at each stage of the cluster lifecycle is established empirically on the basis of interviews with key experts. The main findings comprise a stage-specific group of CSFs whose importance varies across the cluster's lifecycle stages with different patterns. The findings are aimed to stimulate policy makers and researchers alike to pursue further the line of enquiry developed in this paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pion Limited, 2014
Keywords
Cluster evolution, Cluster lifecycle, Critical success factors, ICT clusters
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6381 (URN)10.1068/a46258 (DOI)000345691600012 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo2D5C2069318CADEEC1257D9600391003 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo2D5C2069318CADEEC1257D9600391003 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo2D5C2069318CADEEC1257D9600391003 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2014-11-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Tavassoli, S. (2014). Determinants and Effects of Innovation: Context Matters. (Doctoral dissertation). Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants and Effects of Innovation: Context Matters
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Innovation and technological change is the major factor of production, renewal, and competitiveness of firms and nations in the contemporary “knowledge economy”. The overall purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the innovative behavior of firms in various sectors and regions. In particular, I have analyzed the determinants (driving forces) of firms’ innovation on the one hand (in paper 1 and 2), and the effect of firms’ innovation on the other hand (in paper 3 and 4). In addition, a central concern in this dissertation is that context, in which firms operate and innovate, matters for innovation. I take into account several contexts in the analyses of both the determinants and effects of innovation. These contexts are: the regions in which firms are located, the dynamics of industries, and the dynamics of cluster in which firms belong to. This dissertation consists of four separate papers plus an introductory chapter. Each paper can be read independently, but all of them deal with either determinants or effects of the innovation of firms. The first paper analyzes the effect of various firm-specific determinants on firms’ innovation output. It also considers the stages of the Industry Life Cycle (ILC) as a context in which firms operate and innovate. Using the Community Innovation Survey data for manufacturing and service sectors in Sweden during 2002-2004, I find that the importance of various determinants of firms’ innovation depends on the stages of the ILC in which they operate. The second paper is again investigates the determinants of innovation, but this time incorporates another context that affect the innovation, i.e. the regions that firms belong to. Using the patent applications data as a measure of innovation in all functional regions in Sweden during 2002-2007, we find that both the internal knowledge generated within the region and the inflow of external knowledge matter for innovation of firms located in the regions. Moreover, the extent of related variety of knowledge in the region has the superior role to promote innovation. The third paper examines the effect of a firm’s innovation output on firm’s performance. Export behavior of firms is chosen as a performance indicator. Particular attention is devoted to distinguishing between innovation input and innovation output and to isolate their effects on export behavior of firms. Using two waves of Swedish Community Innovation Survey data during 2002-2006 merged with registered firm-level data, I find that what really matters for enhancing the export behavior of firms is the innovation output of firms, rather than the innovation input (mere efforts in investing in innovation activities). The fourth paper also analyzes the effect of innovation on performance measures but this time incorporates another context, i.e. the life cycle of the regional cluster that firms belong to. This paper delves into a particular cluster, i.e. Linköping ICT cluster. Using data collected through interviews during 2009 and 2012 on key cluster actors, we find that innovation is among the factors that are always highly important at any given stage of the cluster’s evolution, however, it has slightly greater importance during the “growing” stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, 2014. p. 219
Series
Blekinge Institute of Technology Doctoral Dissertation Series, ISSN 1653-2090 ; 10
Keywords
Innovation, Innovation determinant, Innovation effect, Firm, Region, Sweden, Industry life cycle, Cluster life cycle, Export
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-00594 (URN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF4D58B942ADB9E7BC1257D090036E6E7 (Local ID)978-91-7295-285-0 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF4D58B942ADB9E7BC1257D090036E6E7 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoF4D58B942ADB9E7BC1257D090036E6E7 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-07-02 Last updated: 2016-08-12Bibliographically approved
Holgersson, T., Norman, T. & Tavassoli, S. (2014). In the quest for economic significance: Assessing variable importance through mean value decomposition. Applied Economics Letters, 21(8), 545-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the quest for economic significance: Assessing variable importance through mean value decomposition
2014 (English)In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 545-549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Economic significance is frequently assessed through statistical hypothesis testing, which however, does not always correspond to the implicit economical questions being addressed. In this article we propose using mean value decomposition to assess economic significance. Unlike most previously suggested methods the proposed one is intuitive and simple to conduct. The technique is demonstrated and contrasted with hypothesis tests by an empirical example involving the income of Mexican children, which shows that the two inference approaches provide different and supplementary pieces of information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
Keywords
conditioning, economic significance, regression analysis, mean value decomposition, goodness-of-fit
National Category
Business Administration Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6382 (URN)10.1080/13504851.2013.872757 (DOI)000332196800008 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfoA4B7A16324E0D2E6C1257C98003E462F (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoA4B7A16324E0D2E6C1257C98003E462F (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoA4B7A16324E0D2E6C1257C98003E462F (OAI)
Note
The earlier version of paper is also published in following two working paper series: https://static.sys.kth.se/itm/wp/cesis/cesiswp326.pdf http://www.bth.se/mam/forskning.nsf/attachments/Wp%202013_3_Holgersson,%20Norman ,%20Tavassoli_In%20the%20Quest%20for%20Economic%20Significance_pdf/$file/Wp%2020 13_3_Holgersson,%20Norman,%20Tavassoli_In%20the%20Quest%20for%20Economic%20Signi ficance.pdfAvailable from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2014-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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