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Mikaelsson Midlöv, E., Lindberg, T. & Skär, L. (2024). Relative's suggestions for improvements in support from health professionals before and after a patient's death in general palliative care at home: A qualitative register study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative's suggestions for improvements in support from health professionals before and after a patient's death in general palliative care at home: A qualitative register study
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The efforts of relatives in providing palliative care (PC) at home are important. Relatives take great responsibility, face many challenges and are at increased risk of poor physical and mental health. Support for these relatives is important, but they often do not receive the support they need. When PC is provided at home, the support for relatives before and after a patient's death must be improved. This study aimed to describe relatives' suggestions to improve the support from health professionals (HPs) before and after a patient's death in general PC at home. Methods: This study had a qualitative descriptive design based on the data from open-ended questions in a survey collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The respondents were adult relatives involved in general PC at home across Sweden. The textual data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The analysis identified four themes: (1) seeking increased access to HPs, (2) needing enhanced information, (3) desiring improved communication and (4) requesting individual support. Conclusions: It is important to understand and address how the support to relatives may be improved to reduce the unmet needs of relatives. The findings of this study offer some concrete suggestions for improvement on ways to support relatives. Further research should focus on tailored support interventions so that HPs can provide optimal support for relatives before and after a patient's death when PC is provided at home. © 2024 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
home care, palliative care, relatives, support improvements, support needs
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25940 (URN)10.1111/scs.13239 (DOI)001147115800001 ()2-s2.0-85183052281 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-02 Created: 2024-02-02 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Axén, A., Taube, E., Sanmartin Berglund, J. & Skär, L. (2023). Loneliness in Relation to Social Factors and Self-Reported Health Among Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study. Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, 14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loneliness in Relation to Social Factors and Self-Reported Health Among Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study
2023 (English)In: Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, ISSN 2150-1319, E-ISSN 2150-1327, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Loneliness is described as a public health problem and can be both a consequence of aging and a cause of ill health. Lonely older adults tend to have difficulties making new social connections, essential in reducing loneliness. Loneliness often varies over time, but established loneliness tends to persist. Maintaining good health is fundamental throughout the life course. Social connections change with aging, which can contribute to loneliness. AIM: This study aimed to investigate loneliness in relation to social factors and self-reported health among older adults. METHOD: A cross-sectional research design was used based on data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, Blekinge (SNAC-B), from February 2019 to April 2021. Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive and inferential analysis. RESULTS: Of n = 394 participants, 31.7% (n = 125) stated loneliness. Close emotional connections were necessary for less loneliness. Loneliness was more common among those who did not live with their spouse or partner and met more rarely. Furthermore, seeing grandchildren and neighbors less often increased loneliness, and a more extensive social network decreased loneliness. CONCLUSION: This study underlined the importance of social connections and having someone to share a close, emotional connection with to reduce loneliness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
community health, health promotion, lifestyle change, prevention, primary care, aged, aging, article, cross-sectional study, female, grandchild, human, human experiment, lifespan, lifestyle modification, loneliness, major clinical study, male, primary medical care, public health, social aspect, social network, spouse
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25411 (URN)10.1177/21501319231198644 (DOI)001064610600001 ()2-s2.0-85170625592 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SNAC
Available from: 2023-09-22 Created: 2023-09-22 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Stentagg, M., Skär, L. & Lindberg, T. (2023). Sexuality is not age-related: an interview study. Sexual and Relationship Therapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexuality is not age-related: an interview study
2023 (English)In: Sexual and Relationship Therapy, ISSN 1468-1994, E-ISSN 1468-1749Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Increased knowledge of how sexuality is expressed in older persons may create opportunities for healthcare professionals to perform care according to a person-centered approach. To describe older people’s experiences of sexuality concerning aging, a qualitative study was conducted. Eight persons aged 60 and above were interviewed, and the obtained data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings revealed that the participants were certain of being sexually active as they got older. Awareness of what old age can bring regarding illness and increased medication intake was clear, alongside the importance of discussing sexuality with friends or a partner. Age was not seen as an obstacle to continuously being sexually active, and new ways to maintain intimacy and sexuality were identified. According to our results sexuality in older people is about well-being and intimate relationships. Creating opportunities for a trusting, caring relationship can strengthen older people’s sexual health. Healthcare professionals must, therefore, make possibilities for trustful relationships to support and discuss sexuality with older people. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Aging, nursing, older people, sexual health, sexuality
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25502 (URN)10.1080/14681994.2023.2259325 (DOI)2-s2.0-85173759021 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-30 Created: 2023-10-30 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Mikaelsson Midlöv, E., Lindberg, T., Sterner, T. & Skär, L. (2023). Support given by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general palliative care at home in Sweden: Findings from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. Palliative & Supportive Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Support given by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general palliative care at home in Sweden: Findings from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care
2023 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives. General palliative care (PC) is provided more at home, leading to increased involvement of relatives. Although support for relatives is a fundamental component of PC, there are deficiencies in the support provided to relatives when general PC is provided at home. This study aimed to describe the support provided by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general PC at home.

Methods. A cross-sectional register study was implemented, with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative care. The sample consisted of 160 completed surveys from relatives who had been involved in general PC at home, with 160 related surveys answered by health professionals. Only the questions about support to relatives were used from the surveys.

Results. The findings showed that although many relatives appear to receive support in general PC at home, not all relatives receive optimal support before or after a patient's death. The findings also indicated differences in whether relatives received some support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative. There were also differences in responses between health professionals and relatives regarding if relatives received counseling from a doctor about whether the patient was dying.

Significance of results. There is potential for improvements regarding support for relatives, especially after a patient's death, which has been confirmed in previous studies. The differences in whether relatives received support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative highlight the need for future research on how to support different types of relatives before and after a patient's death when general PC is provided at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
Home care, palliative care, relatives support, Of-Life Care, Family Caregivers, End, Cancer, People, Needs
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25485 (URN)10.1017/S1478951523001323 (DOI)001071522700001 ()37746762 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173773758 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-19 Created: 2023-10-19 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Romare, C. & Skär, L. (2023). The use of smart glasses in nursing education: A scoping review. Nurse Education in Practice, 73, Article ID 103824.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of smart glasses in nursing education: A scoping review
2023 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 73, article id 103824Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this scoping review was to give an overview of the usability and feasibility of smart glasses in nursing education. In addition, this study will highlight nursing students’ experiences of using smart glasses in learning situations. Background: Healthcare is becoming increasingly complex and technological and so is nursing education. Technology enhanced learning aims to enhance the teaching-learning process through use of technology, for example through smart glasses. Design and methods: A literature review using a scoping review methodology was conducted. Qualitative content analysis was performed to analyse data. 14 references were included in the analysis. References were found using the databases PubMed, SCOPUS and ERIC. Results: The analysis resulted in three categories; (1) Situations in which smart glasses have been used in nursing education, (2) Learning experiences from using smart glasses in nursing education, and (3) User experiences from using smart glasses in nursing education. Smart glasses were used in different learning situations and were in general positively evaluated by nursing students. Although, drawbacks of using smart glasses were noted which could negatively effect student learning. Conclusions: Smart glasses have been used in a variety of learning situations in nursing education and enabled new learning situations. Students found smart glasses beneficial for their learning and smart glasses motivated and engaged students in the learning situation. Although, this was both user- and situation dependent. Technical issues could cause students to lose focus and there is need for technical support to facilitate the learning curve. By learning from others’ experiences unnecessary drawbacks can be avoided. © 2023 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Education, Learning, Nursing, Scoping review, Smart Glasses, Students
National Category
Learning Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25588 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2023.103824 (DOI)001109087200001 ()2-s2.0-85175569881 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Skär, L., Christel, B., Emtner, M. & Ekström, M. (2023). Thoughts on the end of life in patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A qualitative interview study. Nursing Open, 10(4), 2158-2164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thoughts on the end of life in patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A qualitative interview study
2023 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2158-2164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the study was to deepen the current knowledge of how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and long-term oxygen treatment think about and expect end-of-life. Design: A qualitative design was used. Methods: A purposeful sample of 19 patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was obtained from the Swedish National Registry on Respiratory Failure (Swedevox). Data was collected with semi-structured interviews and analysed using a hermeneutic approach. Results: The analysis revealed three themes: Living in the present without a future; difficulty talking about the uncertainty; and feeling anxious about leaving family behind. Participants indicated that healthcare professionals should invite them to mutual discussions as it was easier to reject an invitation if they could not talk right then, than to initiate a discussion themselves. Start of home oxygen or a deteriorating health status may be an important time to clinically address existential and end-of-life issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Palliative care, COPD, experiences, encounters, symtoms, therapy, death
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-23975 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1463 (DOI)000879079900001 ()36334046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141516298 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-11-24 Created: 2022-11-24 Last updated: 2023-06-19Bibliographically approved
Romare, C., Anderberg, P., Sanmartin Berglund, J. & Skär, L. (2022). Burden of care related to monitoring patient vital signs during intensive care; a descriptive retrospective database study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 71, Article ID 103213.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burden of care related to monitoring patient vital signs during intensive care; a descriptive retrospective database study
2022 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 71, article id 103213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe burden of care related to monitoring patient vital signs of intensive care unit patients in a Swedish hospital. Setting: Data collected by “The Swedish Intensive Care Registry” from one general category II intensive care unit in a Swedish hospital was included in this study. Data from year 2014 to 2020 was analysed comprising a total of 3617 intensive care episodes and 29,165 work shifts. Research methodology: This is a retrospective database study. Descriptive statistics gave an overview of the dataset. To test for differences between variables related to burden of care for “Documentation of monitoring” Mann Whitney U test and Kruskal Wallis test was performed using STATA. Results: “Documentation of monitoring” was reported to generate a prominent burden of care during intensive care. Nearly all patients had continuous monitoring. Comparison for burden of care related to “Documentation of monitoring” for sexes generated no statistically significant difference. Comparison for burden of care related to “Documentation of monitoring” among age groups, diagnose groups and time of day generated statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Monitoring patient vital signs was clearly present during intensive care, hence impacting intensive care nurses’ clinical practice. Further research is endorsed to improve and facilitate monitoring to keep improving patient safety. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Critical care, Intensive care units, Monitoring physiologic, Nursing, Vital signs, Workload, adult, article, clinical practice, controlled study, documentation, drug safety, female, groups by age, human, intensive care, intensive care unit, Kruskal Wallis test, major clinical study, male, nurse, patient safety, rank sum test, retrospective study, vital sign
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22715 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2022.103213 (DOI)000836189200001 ()2-s2.0-85124811308 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-03-07 Created: 2022-03-07 Last updated: 2022-10-14Bibliographically approved
Nygren Zotterman, A., Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2022). Dignity encounters: the experiences of people with long-term illnesses and their close relatives within a primary healthcare setting. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 23, Article ID e72.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dignity encounters: the experiences of people with long-term illnesses and their close relatives within a primary healthcare setting
2022 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 23, article id e72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe the experiences of dignity encounters from the perspective of people with long-term illness and their close relatives within a primary healthcare setting. BACKGROUND: The importance of dignity as a concept in nursing care is well known, and in every healthcare encounter, the patient's dignity has to be protected. METHODS: A purposive sample of 10 people (5 couples) participated in this qualitative descripted study. One person in each of the couples had a long-term illness. Conjoint interviews were conducted and analyzed with an inductive qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in three themes: i) Being supported by an encouraging contact; ii) Being listen to and understood; and iii) Being met with respect. Couples described being encountered with dignity as having accessibility to care in terms of being welcomed with their needs and receiving help. Accessibility promoted beneficial contact with healthcare personnel, who empowered the couples with guidance and support. Couples described a dignity encounter when healthcare personnel confirmed them as valuable and important persons. A dignity encounter was promoted their sense of feeling satisfied with the care they received and promoted safe care. Treated with dignity had a positive impact on the couples' health and well-being and enhanced their sense of a good impression of the healthcare personnel within the primary health care. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare personnel must regard and consider people with long-term illnesses and their close relatives' experiences of dignity encounters to gain an understanding that enables them to support their needs and to know that the care is directed toward them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2022
Keywords
Health Personnel, Humans, Primary Health Care, Qualitative Research, Respect, health care personnel, human, procedures, accessibility, close relatives, confirmation, dignity encounter, interviews, people with long-term illnesses, primary healthcare, thematic content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-23981 (URN)10.1017/S1463423622000603 (DOI)000882873400001 ()2-s2.0-85141702168 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-11-24 Created: 2022-11-24 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Christel, B., Tell, J., Lindberg, T., Nilsson, L., Olsson, A., Forsbrand, M. & Skär, L. (2022). Problem-based learning with digitals tools in the nursing programme during the Covid-19 pandemic. Högre Utbildning, 12(2), 117-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Problem-based learning with digitals tools in the nursing programme during the Covid-19 pandemic
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2022 (English)In: Högre Utbildning, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the spring 2019, the prerequisites for conducting education were changed due to the pandemic. For higher education in Sweden almost all education switches on to digital education. Nursing education has focus on both theoretical and practical courses, which is a challenge for digital or distance education. Furthermore, the nursing programme at the studied university used problem-based learning (PBL), with base-groups at campus. Instead of physical meetings at campus, the base-groups took part with digital tools. The impact of base-groupsmeeting with digital tools are important to reflect on, especially since the education and learning of future probably will be more hybrid. © 2022 Christel Borg, Johanna Tell, Terese Lindberg, Lina Nilsson, Anki Olsson, Malin Forsbrand & Lisa Skär.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2022
Keywords
Covid-19 pandemic, digital tools, nursing education, problembased learning
National Category
Pedagogy Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-24694 (URN)10.23865/hu.v12.3560 (DOI)2-s2.0-85159665814 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-02 Created: 2023-06-02 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Piculell, E., Skär, L., Sanmartin Berglund, J., Anderberg, P. & Bohman, D. (2021). A concept analysis of health communication in a home environment: Perspectives of older persons and their informal caregivers. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 35(3), 1006-1024
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A concept analysis of health communication in a home environment: Perspectives of older persons and their informal caregivers
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2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 1006-1024Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Health communication (HC) is a vast research field focusing on changing health behaviours, and rapidly evolving technology is creating different ways and possibilities to reach target groups and audiences. In the context of home care, a deeper understanding of HC is lacking, specifically for older persons with care needs and their informal caregivers. The aim of this concept analysis is to identify and construct the meaning of HC from the perspective of older persons in need of care in the home environment and their informal caregivers. Materials and methods This study utilised Rogers' (2000) Evolutionary Concept Analysis Method (EMCA) to create and construct a meaning of the concept of HC. The EMCA was based on a systematic literature review of scientific articles, using CINAHL, Pubmed and Inspec (2000-2017). A total of 29 articles were retrieved and analysed. Results The identified attributes of the concept were as follows: resources of the recipient, influence on decisions and advantages of tailored information. HC was described as both contributing to knowledge as well as being overwhelming where habits and resources influenced the use of information. The attributes led to the following descriptive definition of HC: 'Tailored HC, based on needs and resources of the recipient influence care decisions'. The home environment influenced HC by habits and interactions between older persons and their informal caregivers. Conclusions The home environment influenced HC in terms of social aspects of interactions and habits and between the older person and the informal caregiver. Tailored information with the use of technology contributed to knowledge in care of older persons and their informal caregivers. HC was shown to contribute to improve care for older people in their home environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
health communication, home environment, informal caregivers, older persons, technology
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-20783 (URN)10.1111/scs.12928 (DOI)000585679000001 ()33145836 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096724974 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 643399
Note

Open access

Available from: 2020-11-27 Created: 2020-11-27 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5731-2799

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