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Skär, Lisa
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Andersson, E. K., Dellkvist, H., Johansson, U. B. & Skär, L. (2019). Relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care: An interview study. Nursing Open, 6(2), 276-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care: An interview study
2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim of this study was to describe relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care. Design An explorative descriptive qualitative design was used. Methods The data were collected using semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of eight relatives and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Results Results show that creating and sharing the life story of a close family member could help relatives handle grief and stress. It was perceived as an important, yet difficult, task to ensure that the close family member got good quality care. The creation of a meaningful life story takes time and requires cooperation with family members and other significant people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
dementia, experiences, life story, person-centred care, relative, residential care
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17775 (URN)10.1002/nop2.208 (DOI)000461835600008 ()30918679 (PubMedID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Romare, C., Hass, U. & Skär, L. (2018). Healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses in intensive care: A qualitative study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 45, 66-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses in intensive care: A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 45, p. 66-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses before their implementation in an intensive care unit, both regarding quality of use of the glasses and to identify possible intensive care situations where the glasses could be used to increase patient safety. Methods: Data were generated through focus group interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis. Findings: The findings describe participants' views of smart glasses divided into three categories; Smart glasses to facilitate work at intensive care unit; Quality of use and Utilisation. Participants assumed smart glasses to cause both effect and affect in intensive care. Participants' concern for patients arose recurrently and through their concern intention to work to promote patient safety. Conclusion: Smart glasses are suggested as a complement to existing monitoring and routines and cannot replace human presence in intensive care. © 2017 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Critical care, Focus groups, Intensive care units, Monitoring physiologic, Patient safety, Patient-centred care, Qualitative research, Smart glasses, Surveillance
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15738 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2017.11.006 (DOI)000427792500012 ()2-s2.0-85039550176 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Nygren Zotterman, A., Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Meanings of encounters for close relatives of people with a long-term illness within a primary healthcare setting. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 19(4), 392-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of encounters for close relatives of people with a long-term illness within a primary healthcare setting
2018 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 392-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Encounters play an important role in the relationship between healthcare personnel and the close relatives of people with a long-term illness. Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate the meanings of encounters for close relatives of people with a long-term illness within a primary healthcare setting. Methods: Interviews using a narrative approach were conducted with seven women and three men, and the phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to interpret the interview texts. Results: The structural analysis revealed three major themes: being confirmed as a family, being informed of the care, and being respected as a valuable person. Close relatives stated that they wanted to be confirmed as a family and have a familiar and trusting relationship with healthcare personnel. They valued being informed concerning the care of the ill person so that they could give support at home. It was also important to be compassionately viewed as an important person in a welcoming atmosphere based on respect and dignity. © Cambridge University Press 2018

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
close relatives, narrative interviews, people with long-term illness, phenomenological hermeneutics, primary healthcare, adult, article, atmosphere, clinical article, female, health care personnel, hermeneutics, human, human dignity, human experiment, interview, male, narrative, primary health care, relative, structure analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16083 (URN)10.1017/S1463423618000178 (DOI)000439350700008 ()2-s2.0-85044396737 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2018). Patients' complaints regarding healthcare encounters and communication. Nursing Open, 5(2), 224-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' complaints regarding healthcare encounters and communication
2018 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 224-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore patient-reported complaints regarding communication and healthcare encounters and how these were responded to by healthcare professionals. Design: A retrospective and descriptive design was used in a County Council in northern part of Sweden. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Methods: The content of 587 patient-reported complaints was included in the study. Descriptive statistical analysis and a deductive content analysis were used to investigate the content in the patient-reported complaints. Results: The results show that patients' dissatisfaction with encounters and communication concerned all departments in the healthcare organization. Patients were most dissatisfied when they were not met in a professional manner. There were differences between genders, where women reported more complaints regarding their dissatisfaction with encounters and communication compared with men. Many of the answers on the patient-reported complaints lack a personal apology and some of the patients failed to receive an answer to their complaints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
communication, nurse-patient relationship, patient advisory committee, patient complaints, quality of health care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16105 (URN)10.1002/nop2.132 (DOI)000428455600014 ()29599998 (PubMedID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-04-19
Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2018). The importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare: A discussion paper. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 74(5), 1043-1050
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare: A discussion paper
2018 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1043-1050Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of this paper was to discuss the importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in health care. BackgroundChallenges in healthcare today include a growing older population and, as a consequence, an increased need for healthcare services. One possible solution is the use of eHealth services. DesignDiscussion paper. Data sourcesResearch literature published from 2000-2017 in CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus. Implications for nursingImplementing eHealth services in health care involves ethical challenges where different technologies can solve different problems in different ways. eHealth services should therefore be developed and implemented based on the patient's specific needs and conditions for use and in accordance with the healthcare professionals' presumption to provide high-quality care. ConclusionTo preserve patients' integrity, dignity and autonomy, healthcare professionals must include ethical aspects when implementing and using eHealth services in health care. Healthcare professionals have to take responsibility for the eHealth services introduced, explaining why and how they are implemented based on a person-centred approach. More knowledge is needed about ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services to improve the quality of care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
autonomy, dignity, eHealth, ethical aspects, health care, implementation, nursing, participation, person-centred care, quality care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16148 (URN)10.1111/jan.13493 (DOI)000430121900007 ()29105151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
Holst, A. & Skär, L. (2017). Formal caregivers' experiences of aggressive behaviour in older people living with dementia in nursing homes: A systematic review. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 12(4), Article ID e12158.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formal caregivers' experiences of aggressive behaviour in older people living with dementia in nursing homes: A systematic review
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e12158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate formal caregivers' experiences of aggressive behaviour in older people living with dementia in nursing homes. Background: Aggressive behaviour symptoms among older people living with dementia are reported to be prevalent. As aggressive behaviour includes both verbal and physical behaviours, such as kicking, hitting and screaming, it causes an increased burden on formal caregivers. Professionals experiencing this aggression perceived it as challenging, causing physical and psychological damage, leading to anger, stress and depression. Methods: A systematic review was conducted. A search of published research studies between 2000 and 2015 was conducted using appropriate search terms. Eleven studies were identified and included in this review. Results: The analysis resulted in four categories: formal caregivers' views on triggers of aggression, expressions of aggression, the effect of aggressive behaviours on formal caregivers and formal caregivers' strategies to address aggression. The results show that aggressive behaviour may lead to negative feelings in formal caregivers and nursing home residents. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that having the ability to identify triggers possibly assists caregivers with addressing aggressive behaviour. Aggressive behaviour might also affect quality of care. Implications for practice: Results from this systematic review indicate that caregivers prefer person-centred strategies to handle aggressive behaviour among older people, while the use of pharmaceuticals and coercion strategies is a last resort. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
Aggressive behaviour, Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, Dementia, Nursing, Nursing home, Qualitative, Systematic review
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15021 (URN)10.1111/opn.12158 (DOI)000416161000005 ()2-s2.0-85021751195 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Andersson, E. K. & Skär, L. (2017). Younger persons' and their next of kin's experiences of cardiac care during the first year following a myocardial infarction. Paper presented at EuroHeartCare 2017, Jönköping. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(S1), S37-S38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Younger persons' and their next of kin's experiences of cardiac care during the first year following a myocardial infarction
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no S1, p. S37-S38Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology; Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14470 (URN)000401775600064 ()
Conference
EuroHeartCare 2017, Jönköping
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, E., Söderberg, S. & Skär, L. (2016). Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood: Parenting young adults with mental illness. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37(2), 98-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood: Parenting young adults with mental illness
2016 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents of young adults with mental illness may face a continued demand for support, even though their children have reached the age of majority. The aim of this study was to explore relatives experiences of parenting a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood. Individual interviews were conducted and analysed according to Grounded Theory. The results showed that relatives experienced powerlessness and a sense of inescapable duty with limited possibilities to be relieved. With a family nursing approach, relatives can be supported and, when the young adults needs of care are met, they can be relieved from their burden of responsibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
SERIOUS EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE; PSYCHIATRIC-CARE; RELATIVES; EXPERIENCES; SUPPORT; FAMILY; INTERVENTION; YOUTH; LIFE
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11649 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2015.1092621 (DOI)000370619400006 ()
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Nygren Zotterman, A., Skär, L., Olsson, M. & Söderberg, S. (2016). Being in togetherness: Meanings of encounters within primary healtcare setting for patients living with long-term illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(19-20), 2854-2862
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being in togetherness: Meanings of encounters within primary healtcare setting for patients living with long-term illness
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 19-20, p. 2854-2862Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of encounters for patients with long-term illness within the primary healthcare setting. Background: Good encounters can be crucial for patients in terms of how they view their quality of care. Therefore, it is important to understand meanings of interactions between patients and healthcare personnel. Design: A phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to analyse the interviews. Methods: Narrative interviews with ten patients with long-term illness were performed, with a focus on their encounters with healthcare personnel within the primary healthcare setting. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used to interpret the interview texts. Results: The results demonstrated that patients felt well when they were seen as an important person and felt welcomed by healthcare personnel. Information and follow-ups regarding the need for care were essential. Continuity with the healthcare personnel was one way to establish a relationship, which contributed to patients’ feelings of being seen and understood. Good encounters were important for patients’ feelings of health and well-being. Being met with mistrust, ignorance and nonchalance had negative effects on patients’ perceived health and well-being and led to feelings of lower confidence regarding the care received. Conclusions: Patients described a great need to be confirmed and met with respect by healthcare personnel, which contributed to their sense of togetherness. Having a sense of togetherness strengthened patient well-being. Relevance to clinical practice: By listening and responding to patients’ needs and engaging in meetings with patients in a respectful manner, healthcare personnel can empower patients’ feelings of health and well-being. Healthcare personnel need to be aware of the significance of these actions because they can make patients experience feelings of togetherness, even if patients meet with different care personnel at each visit. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2016
Keywords
chronic patient; clinical article; clinical practice; doctor patient relation; health care personnel; human; interview; narrative; primary health care; wellbeing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13198 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13333 (DOI)000388921200014 ()2-s2.0-84978160765 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, C., Lindberg, B., Skär, L. & Söderberg, S. (2016). Meanings of balance for people with long-term illnesses. British Journal of Community Nursing, 21(11), 563-567
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of balance for people with long-term illnesses
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, E-ISSN 2052-2215, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 563-567Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of balance in everyday life for people with long-term illnesses living at home. People living with long-term illnesses are in need of help and support to manage their daily lives. Twelve adults with extensive needs for help and support were interviewed. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the interview texts. The findings show that balance in everyday life for people with long-term illnesses means striving for independence through care and support in their surroundings. It was also important to be able to choose how their lives would be and to be with others who listened and understood them for who they are. By building a relationship with patients at an early stage of their illnesses, nursing staff have an opportunity to understand what people who are living at home with long-term illnesses need in order to achieve balance in their everyday lives.

Keywords
Adults, Balance, Home care, Long-term illness, Phenomenological hermeneutic, Primary care, clinical article, human, interview, nursing staff, primary medical care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13488 (URN)10.12968/bjcn.2016.21.11.563 (DOI)2-s2.0-84994689515 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-24 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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