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Moe, Nils Brede
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Šmite, D., Moe, N. B., Wigander, J. & Esser, H. (2019). Corporate-level communities at ericsson: Parallel organizational structure for fostering alignment for autonomy. In: Kruchten, P; Fraser, S; Coallier, F (Ed.), Lect. Notes Bus. Inf. Process.: AGILE PROCESSES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND EXTREME PROGRAMMING, XP 2019. Paper presented at 20th International Conference on Agile Software Development, XP 2019; Montreal; Canada; 21 May 2019 through 25 May (pp. 173-188). Springer Verlag, 355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corporate-level communities at ericsson: Parallel organizational structure for fostering alignment for autonomy
2019 (English)In: Lect. Notes Bus. Inf. Process.: AGILE PROCESSES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND EXTREME PROGRAMMING, XP 2019 / [ed] Kruchten, P; Fraser, S; Coallier, F, Springer Verlag , 2019, Vol. 355, p. 173-188Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organizational management traditionally has taken care of all the important strategy, structure, and work-design decisions, as well as most of the ongoing decisions about work procedures. In large-scale corporations with many geographically distributed sites and high divisional detachment, such strategies are yet doomed to result in implementing irrelevant work methods and procedures that conflict with the local interests. As Tayloristic habits are disappearing, organizations willingly or unwillingly change their decision-making approaches to enable more participation and influence from the performers. These trends are associated with the rise of participation-based parallel structures, such as quality circles, task forces or communities of practice. In this paper, we present our findings from studying corporate-level communities by the means of a multi-case study at Ericsson. We found that the main hindrances are related to the limited decision-making authority of parallel structure, member selection and achieving representation across the organizational units. Our results suggest that parallel structures highly depend on the authority of the members within their local communities, and their ability to not only channel the dialog between the units they represent and the community, but also enable the active engagement of the unit in the community studies. As such, we believe that special attention shall be put on the ambassador role of the community members. © The Author(s) 2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2019
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348
Keywords
Alignment for autonomy, Bottom-up governance, Communities, Empirical, Large-scale agile, Organizational agility, Parallel structures, Ecosystems, Job analysis, Software design, Bottom up, Decision making
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-18011 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-19034-7_11 (DOI)000490717900011 ()2-s2.0-85065866537 (Scopus ID)9783030190330 (ISBN)
Conference
20th International Conference on Agile Software Development, XP 2019; Montreal; Canada; 21 May 2019 through 25 May
Note

Open access

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Sablis, A., Šmite, D. & Moe, N. B. (2018). Exploring cross-site networking in large-scale distributed projects. In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics): . Paper presented at 19th International Conference on Product-Focused Software Process Improvement, PROFES 2018; Wolfsburg; Germany; 28 November 2018 through 30 November 2018 (pp. 318-333). Springer Verlag, 11271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring cross-site networking in large-scale distributed projects
2018 (English)In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), Springer Verlag , 2018, Vol. 11271, p. 318-333Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Context: Networking in a distributed large-scale project is complex because of many reasons: time zone problems can make it challenging to reach remote contacts, teams rarely meet face-to-face which means that remote project members are often unfamiliar with each other, and applying activities for growing the network across sites is also challenging. At the same time, networking is one of the primary ways to share and receive knowledge and information important for developing software tasks and coordinating project activities. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to explore the actual networks of teams working in large-scale distributed software development projects and project characteristics that might impact their need for networking. Method: We conducted a multi-case study with three project cases in two companies, with software development teams as embedded units of analysis. We organized 20 individual interviews to characterize the development projects and surveyed 96 members from the total of 14 teams to draw the actual teams networks. Results: Our results show that teams in large-scale projects network in order to acquire knowledge from experts, and to coordinate tasks with other teams. We also learned that regardless of project characteristics, networking between sites in distributed projects is relatively low. Conclusions: Our study emphasizes the importance of networking. Therefore, we suggest that similar companies should pay extra attention for cultivating a networking culture in the large to strengthen their cross-site communication. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743
Keywords
Coordination networks, Distributed, Knowledge networks, Large-scale, Software development, Cultivation, Process engineering, Software engineering, Distributed projects, Distributed software development, Project characteristics, Software development teams, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17418 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-03673-7_23 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057273567 (Scopus ID)9783030036720 (ISBN)
Conference
19th International Conference on Product-Focused Software Process Improvement, PROFES 2018; Wolfsburg; Germany; 28 November 2018 through 30 November 2018
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Šmite, D., Moe, N. B., Šablis, A. & Wohlin, C. (2017). Software teams and their knowledge networks in large-scale software development. Information and Software Technology, 86(JUN), 71-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Software teams and their knowledge networks in large-scale software development
2017 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 86, no JUN, p. 71-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Large software development projects involve multiple interconnected teams, often spread around the world, developing complex products for a growing number of customers and users. Succeeding with large-scale software development requires access to an enormous amount of knowledge and skills. Since neither individuals nor teams can possibly possess all the needed expertise, the resource availability in a team's knowledge network, also known as social capital, and effective knowledge coordination become paramount. Objective: In this paper, we explore the role of social capital in terms of knowledge networks and networking behavior in large-scale software development projects. Method: We conducted a multi-case study in two organizations, Ericsson and ABB, with software development teams as embedded units of analysis. We organized focus groups with ten software teams and surveyed 61 members from these teams to characterize and visualize the teams' knowledge networks. To complement the team perspective, we conducted individual interviews with representatives of supporting and coordination roles. Based on survey data, data obtained from focus groups, and individual interviews, we compared the different network characteristics and mechanisms that support knowledge networks. We used social network analysis to construct the team networks, thematic coding to identify network characteristics and context factors, and tabular summaries to identify the trends. Results: Our findings indicate that social capital and networking are essential for both novice and mature teams when solving complex, unfamiliar, or interdependent tasks. Network size and networking behavior depend on company experience, employee turnover, team culture, need for networking, and organizational support. A number of mechanisms can support the development of knowledge networks and social capital, for example, introduction of formal technical experts, facilitation of communities of practice and adequate communication infrastructure. Conclusions: Our study emphasizes the importance of social capital and knowledge networks. Therefore, we suggest that, along with investments into training programs, software companies should also cultivate a networking culture to strengthen their social capital, a known driver of better performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Agile, Case study, Cross-functional, Empirical, Feature teams, Intellectual capital, Knowledge networks, Large-scale software development, Social capital, Teams, Complex networks, Human resource management, Investments, Knowledge management, Personnel training, Software engineering, Surveys, Social capitals, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13929 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2017.01.003 (DOI)000399855200005 ()2-s2.0-85010957499 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Moe, N. B., Šmite, D., Hanssen, G. K. & Barney, H. (2014). From offshore outsourcing to insourcing and partnerships: four failed outsourcing attempts. Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, 19(5), 1225-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From offshore outsourcing to insourcing and partnerships: four failed outsourcing attempts
2014 (English)In: Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, ISSN 1382-3256, E-ISSN 1573-7616, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1225-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most large software companies are involved in offshore development, now small and medium-sized companies are starting to undertake global sourcing too. Empirical research suggests that offshoring is not always successful; however, only a few comprehensive failure stories have been reported. The objective of our study has been to understand why small and medium-sized companies terminate their offshore outsourcing relationships and what alternative arrangements they undertake afterwards. Therefore, we designed a multiple case study of four medium-sized Scandinavian software companies that have terminated their offshore outsourcing relationships. Our results are based on data collected through semi-structured interviews, informal dialogues and analysis of company documents. We found that all companies terminated their offshore contracts because of low quality of the software being developed. This was caused by an inability to build the necessary human and social capital. The companies reported challenges with domain knowledge, a lack of commitment of external developers, cultural clashes, poor communication and high turnover, which only amplified the problems. After termination all four companies changed their sourcing strategy from offshore outsourcing to offshore insourcing and partnerships. We conclude that successful offshore software development requires a change from a cost-driven focus to an intellectual capital driven focus. To prevent continuous investments into contracts that are destined to fail, companies should look for signs of escalating commitments and terminate relationships that cannot be corrected. Those companies that choose outsourcing shall also take into account that mismatch between the size of the offshore contract relative to the vendor may have a negative effect on a relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Global software engineering, Global software development, Distributed software development, Offshoring, Insourcing, Backsouring, Outsourcing, Single-loop and double-loop learning, Escalating commitment, Intellectual capital, Human capital, Social capital, Organizational capital, SME, Multiple-Case Study
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6454 (URN)10.1007/s10664-013-9272-x (DOI)000342429900003 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfoAE456D1BA3D6CB47C1257D8F0076E324 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoAE456D1BA3D6CB47C1257D8F0076E324 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoAE456D1BA3D6CB47C1257D8F0076E324 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-01-02 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Moe, N. B., Šmite, D., Šāblis, A., Börjesson, A.-L. & Andréasson, P. (2014). Networking in a Large-Scale Distributed Agile Project. In: : . Paper presented at International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement. Turin: ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networking in a Large-Scale Distributed Agile Project
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Context: In large-scale distributed software projects the expertise may be scattered across multiple locations. Goal: We describe and discuss a large-scale distributed agile project at Ericsson, a multinational telecommunications company headquartered in Sweden. The project is distributed across four development locations (one in Sweden, one in Korea and two in China) and employs 17 teams. In such a large scale environment the challenge is to have as few dependences between teams as possible, which is one reason why Ericsson introduced crossfunctional feature teams – teams that are capable of taking the full responsibility for implementing one entire feature. To support such teams when solving problems, ensure knowledge sharing within the project and safeguard the quality Ericsson introduced a new role – Technical Area Responsible (TAR). Method: We conducted extensive fieldwork for 9 months at two Ericsson sites in Sweden and China. We interviewed representatives from different roles in the organization, in addition to focus groups and a survey with seven teams. Results: We describe the TAR role, and how the TARs communicate, coordinate and support the teams. Also architects support the teams, however not as closely as the TARs. We found that the TAR is usually a senior developer working halftime or fulltime in the role. We also present measures of the actual knowledge network of three Chinese and three Swedish teams and the TARs position in it. Conclusions: TARs are central in the knowledge network and act as the boundary spanners between the teams and between the sites. We learned that availability of the TARs across sites is lower than that with local TARs. We also found that the size of a team’s knowledge network depends on how long the team members have been working in the company. Finally we discuss the advantages and the challenges of introducing experts in key roles in large scale distributed agile development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turin: ACM, 2014
Keywords
Boundary spanners, global software development, offshoring, insourcing, social network analysis, distributed agile, large-scale agile, technical area responsibility.
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6569 (URN)10.1145/2652524.2652584 (DOI)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDFCB414203141D5AC1257D8F0076330D (Local ID)978-1-4503-2774-9 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDFCB414203141D5AC1257D8F0076330D (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoDFCB414203141D5AC1257D8F0076330D (OAI)
Conference
International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Dingsoyr, T. & Moe, N. B. (2014). Towards Principles of Large-Scale Agile Development A Summary of the Workshop at XP2014 and a Revised Research Agenda. In: AGILE METHODS: LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT, REFACTORING, TESTING, AND ESTIMATION. Paper presented at 15th International Conference on Agile Software Development (XP), MAY 26-30, 2014, Rome, ITALY (pp. 1-8).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Principles of Large-Scale Agile Development A Summary of the Workshop at XP2014 and a Revised Research Agenda
2014 (English)In: AGILE METHODS: LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT, REFACTORING, TESTING, AND ESTIMATION, 2014, p. 1-8Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Large projects are increasingly adopting agile development practices, and this raises new challenges for research. The workshop on principles of large-scale agile development focused on central topics in large-scale: the role of architecture, inter-team coordination, portfolio management and scaling agile practices. We propose eight principles for large-scale agile development, and present a revised research agenda.

Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348 ; 199
Keywords
Large-scale agile software development; architecture; portfolio management; project management; scaling; inter-team coordination; software engineering
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-12476 (URN)000357375600001 ()978-3-319-14358-3; 978-3-319-14357-6 (ISBN)
Conference
15th International Conference on Agile Software Development (XP), MAY 26-30, 2014, Rome, ITALY
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Moe, N., Barney, S., Aurum, A., Khurum, M., Wohlin, C., Barney, H., . . . Winata, M. (2012). Fostering and sustaining innovation in a Fast Growing Agile Company. In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science: . Paper presented at 13th International Conference on Product-Focused Software Process Improvement, PROFES (pp. 160-174). Madrid: Springer, 7343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering and sustaining innovation in a Fast Growing Agile Company
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2012 (English)In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Madrid: Springer , 2012, Vol. 7343, p. 160-174Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sustaining innovation in a fast growing software development company is difficult. As organisations grow, peoples' focus often changes from the big picture of the product being developed to the specific role they fill. This paper presents two complementary approaches that were successfully used to support continued developer-driven innovation in a rapidly growing Australian agile software development company. The method "FedEx TM Day" gives developers one day to showcase a proof of concept they believe should be part of the product, while the method "20% Time" allows more ambitious projects to be undertaken. Given the right setting and management support, the two approaches can support and improve bottom-up innovation in organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Madrid: Springer, 2012
Keywords
20% Time, agile software development, case study, empirical, FedEx Day, innovation, scrum, XP
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-7062 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-31063-8_13 (DOI)oai:bth.se:forskinfoC661A1CB1695B6B7C1257AC6004FAC36 (Local ID)9783642310621 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoC661A1CB1695B6B7C1257AC6004FAC36 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoC661A1CB1695B6B7C1257AC6004FAC36 (OAI)
Conference
13th International Conference on Product-Focused Software Process Improvement, PROFES
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-11-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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