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Renvert, Stefan
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Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Renvert, S., Lindahl, C. & Persson, G. R. (2018). Occurrence of cases with peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis in a 21-26years follow-up study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 45(2), 233-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence of cases with peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis in a 21-26years follow-up study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimTo determine the prevalence and development of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis and to assess risk factors over time. Materials and MethodsThe study is a longitudinal case series assessing the occurrence and diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. ResultsA total of 218 of 294 patients who had received dental implants between 1988 and 1992 were examined between 2000 and 2002 (examination II; 9-14years after the first examination). At examination III (20-26years after examination I, on average 23.3years), 86 individuals were re-examined. The diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis at examination III was 54.7% and 22.1%, respectively. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis after examination II resulted in a bone gain for two of 12 individuals. Individuals with 3 implants at examination II were at risk for peri-implantitis at examination III (P< 0.05). Radiographic evidence of periodontitis (p=0.40), a diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis (p=.77) or smoking (p=.86) at examination II were not predictive of peri-implantitis at examination III. ConclusionsThe diagnosis and occurrence of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis were high. Healthy conditions at implants after 9-14years were predictive of future implant health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
human, peri-implant mucositis, peri-implantitis, prevalence, risk factors
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15808 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12822 (DOI)000419830500009 ()28963776 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Renvert, S., Persson, G. R., Pirih, F. Q. & Camargo, P. M. (2018). Peri-implant health, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis: Case definitions and diagnostic considerations. Paper presented at World Workshop on the Classification of Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions, NOV 09-11, 2017, Chicago, IL. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 45, S278-S285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peri-implant health, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis: Case definitions and diagnostic considerations
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, p. S278-S285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this review is to identify case definitions and clinical criteria of peri-implant healthy tissues, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis. The case definitions were constructed based on a review of the evidence applicable for diagnostic considerations. In summary, the diagnostic definition of peri-implant health is based on the following criteria: 1) absence of peri-implant signs of soft tissue inflammation (redness, swelling, profuse bleeding on probing), and 2) the absence of further additional bone loss following initial healing. The diagnostic definition of peri-implant mucositis is based on following criteria: 1) presence of peri-implant signs of inflammation (redness, swelling, line or drop of bleeding within 30 seconds following probing), combined with 2) no additional bone loss following initial healing. The clinical definition of peri-implantitis is based on following criteria: 1) presence of peri-implant signs of inflammation, 2) radiographic evidence of bone loss following initial healing, and 3) increasing probing depth as compared to probing depth values collected after placement of the prosthetic reconstruction. In the absence of previous radiographs, radiographic bone level 3 mm in combination with BOP and probing depths 6 mm is indicative of peri-implantitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
diagnosis, peri-implant health, peri-implant mucositis, peri-implantitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16739 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12956 (DOI)000435795300022 ()29926496 (PubMedID)
Conference
World Workshop on the Classification of Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions, NOV 09-11, 2017, Chicago, IL
Available from: 2018-07-05 Created: 2018-07-05 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, H., Sanmartin Berglund, J. & Renvert, S. (2018). Periodontitis, tooth loss and cognitive functions among older adults. Clinical Oral Investigations, 22(5), 2103-2109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periodontitis, tooth loss and cognitive functions among older adults
2018 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 2103-2109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study aims to evaluate the potential association between periodontitis, the number of teeth and cognitive functions in a cohort of older adults in Sweden. Material and methods: In total, 775 individuals from 60 to 99 years of age were selected for the study. A clinical and radiographic examination was performed. The number of teeth and prevalence of periodontal pockets and bone loss was calculated and categorised. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and clock test. The education level was obtained from a questionnaire. Data were analysed using chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Age and gender were associated with the prevalence of bone loss. Age and education were associated with lower number of teeth. Gender was also associated with the presence of pockets. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant association between prevalence of bone loss, the number of teeth and the outcome on MMSE test. This association remained even after adjustment for age, education and gender. Tooth loss was also associated with lower outcome on clock test. Presence of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm was not associated with cognitive test outcome. Conclusions: A history of periodontitis and tooth loss may be of importance for cognitive functions among older adults. Clinical relevance: Diseases with and inflammatory profile may have an impact on cognitive decline. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2018
Keywords
Dementia, Epidemiology, Mild cognitive impairment, Periodontal diseases and tooth loss
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15714 (URN)10.1007/s00784-017-2307-8 (DOI)000431880700023 ()2-s2.0-85038611040 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Renvert, S., Widén, C. & Persson, R. (2017). Cytokine and microbial profiles in relation to the clinical outcome following treatment of peri-implantitis. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 28(9), 1127-1132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytokine and microbial profiles in relation to the clinical outcome following treatment of peri-implantitis
2017 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1127-1132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study whether cytokine levels and bacterial counts in p atients with peri-implantitis reflect clinical treatment outcome following non-surgical management. Materials and Methods: Luminex magnet bead technology and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization were used to assess treatment outcome after treatment at the implant with the most severe peri-implantitis in 41 participants. Results: Study group mean age was 40.3 years (SD ± 9.9). Stable treatment outcome after 6 months (no further bone loss, probing pocket depth decrease ≥0.5 mm, no bleeding/suppuration) was identified in 9 of 41 (22%) participants. Peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) levels were also lower for Il-1β (P &lt; 0.01), and with trends of lower cytokine levels in PICF for TNF-α (P = 0.071), PDGFBB (P = 0.071), as well as for VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) (P = 0.071), and bacterial counts for Actinomyces israelii, Aggregatibacter actonomycetemcomitans (Y4), Campylobacter gracilis, Echerichia coli, Fusobacterium periodonticum, Leptotrichia buccalis, Parvimonas micra, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Tannerella forsythia. Increasing levels of IL-1 β and S. aureus (r2 = 0.856) were found only at implants with non-stable outcome. A reduction of PICF levels for selected cytokines and bacteria studied had a sensitivity of 0.77, and a specificity of 0.80 against the clinical outcome as gold standard. Data analysis failed to differences in treatments (PerioFlow® versus YAG: ER laser) for changes in the expression of cytokines and bacteria studied. Conclusions: At 6 months, clinically stable treatment outcome of peri-implantitis is associated lower levels of putative pathogens total bacterial load with ≥30% reduction of IL1-β, L-6, and VEGF levels in PICF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
Bacteria, Dental implant, Human, Pro-inflammatory marker
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13493 (URN)10.1111/clr.12927 (DOI)000409448600020 ()2-s2.0-84994144984 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-24 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-10-05Bibliographically approved
Andersson, P., Renvert, S., Sjogren, P. & Zimmerman, M. (2017). Dental status in nursing home residents with domiciliary dental care in Sweden. Community Dental Health, 34(4), 203-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental status in nursing home residents with domiciliary dental care in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Community Dental Health, ISSN 0265-539X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 203-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe the dental health status of elderly people in nursing homes receiving domiciliary dental care. Design: Case note review. Clinical setting: Nursing homes in 8 Swedish counties. Participants: Care dependent elderly people (>= 65 years). Methods: Clinical data, including the number of remaining natural teeth, missing and decayed teeth (manifest dental caries) and root remnants, recorded by dentists according to standard practices. Medical and dental risk assessments were performed. Results: Data were available for 20,664 patients. Most were women (69.1%), with a mean age of 87.1 years (SD 7.42, range 65-109). The mean age for men was 83.5 years (SD 8.12, range 65-105). Two or more medical conditions were present in most of the population. A total of 16,210 individuals had existing teeth of whom 10,974 (67.7%) had manifest caries. The mean number of teeth with caries was 5.0 (SD 5.93) corresponding to 22.8% of existing teeth. One in four individuals were considered to have a very high risk in at least one professional dental risk assessment category. Conclusions: Care dependent elderly in nursing homes have very poor oral health. There is a need to focus on the oral health-related quality of life for this group of frail elderly during their final period of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
F D I WORLD DENTAL PRESS LTD, 2017
Keywords
dental status, domiciliary care, elderly, geriatric dentistry, nursing homes, Sweden
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15998 (URN)000426806600004 ()29136361 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Hallström, H., Persson, G. R., Lindgren, S. & Renvert, S. (2017). Open flap debridement of peri-implantitis with or without adjunctive systemic antibiotics: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 44(12), 1285-1293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open flap debridement of peri-implantitis with or without adjunctive systemic antibiotics: A randomized clinical trial
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1285-1293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To investigate clinical, radiographic and microbiological outcome over 12 months following open flap debridement of peri-implantitis with or without antibiotics. Materials and methods: Peri-implantitis was surgically treated with or without Zithromax® in 19 control and 20 test individuals. Probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival inflammation (BOP), intra-oral radiographs and microbial samples were studied. Per protocol and intent-to-treat analyses were performed. Results: The mean difference (reduction) in PPD values between baseline and month 12 in the test and control groups was 1.7 mm (SD ± 1.1, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.3, p &lt;.001) and 1.6 mm (SD ± 1.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 2,4, p &lt;.001), respectively. Data analysis failed to show study group differences for BOP, PPD, radiographic bone level and microbial load. Successful treatment (per protocol: PPD ≤ 5 mm, no BOP, no suppuration and no bone loss ≥0.5 mm) at 12 months in test and control groups was 7/15 (46.7%) and 4/16 (25.0%). Bacterial load reduction was similar in study groups with a temporary reduction following treatment. Conclusions: Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis with adjunctive systemic azithromycin did not provide 1-year clinical benefits in comparison with those only receiving open flap debridement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Munksgaard, 2017
Keywords
antibiotics, microbiota, peri-implantitis, surgical treatment
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15677 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12805 (DOI)000417120000011 ()2-s2.0-85037162938 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Erovic Ademovski, S., Mårtensson, C., Persson, G. R. & Renvert, S. (2017). The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 44(10), 1010-1019
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis: A randomized clinical trial
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1010-1019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate the long-term effects of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate mouth rinse (Zn/CHX) on intra-oral halitosis. Materials and methods: Forty-six adults with intra-oral halitosis were randomized into a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. The presence of intra-oral halitosis was evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months after treatment by assessment of organoleptic score (OLS) and by total volatile sulphur compounds (T-VSC), hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and methyl mercaptan (MM) concentrations in exhaled air. Results: A Zn/CHX mouth rinse provided significantly better control of intra-oral halitosis than a placebo mouth rinse. At 3 and 6 months, individuals rinsing with the Zn/CHX rinse presented with reductions of the OLS, T-VSC (p &lt;.01, respectively), H2S (p &lt;.001), and MM (p &lt;.01) in subjects’ exhaled air. At 6 months, 68.2% of individuals using the Zn/CHX rinse experienced a 1 or 2 category improvement in OLS compared with 19.1% of placebo-treated subjects. 91% of subjects in the Zn/CHX group were categorized as being effectively treated for intra-oral halitosis (i.e. H2S &lt; 112 ppb), compared to 43% in the placebo group. Conclusion: Zn/CHX mouth rinse provides effective long-term efficacy against intra-oral halitosis, assessed both objectively and subjectively. With regular rinsing, the effect was sustained for 6 months. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Munksgaard, 2017
Keywords
bad breath, halitosis, hydrogen sulphide, mouth rinse, volatile sulphur compounds, Zn/CHX rinse
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15336 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12779 (DOI)000417407300007 ()2-s2.0-85030086059 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, V. W., Persson, G. R., Berglund, J. & Renvert, S. (2016). A cross-sectional study of the associations between periodontitis and carotid arterial calcifications in an elderly population. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 74(2), 115-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-sectional study of the associations between periodontitis and carotid arterial calcifications in an elderly population
2016 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To evaluate if the presence of periodontitis is associated with carotid arterial calcifications diagnosed on panoramic radiographs in an elderly population. Materials and methods. Study individuals were randomly selected from the Swedish civil registration database representing the aging population (60-96 years) in Karlskrona, Sweden. Bleeding on probing (BOP) and the deepest probing measurement at each tooth were registered. The proportions of teeth with a probing depth 5 mm and the proportion of teeth with bleeding on probing were calculated. Analog panoramic radiographs were taken and the proportion of sites with a distance 5 mm between the alveolar bone level and the cement-enamel junction (CEJ) were assessed. A diagnosis of periodontitis was declared if a distance between the alveolar bone level and the CEJ 5 mm could be identified from the panoramic radiographs at >10% of sites, probing depth of 5 mm at one tooth or more and with BOP at >20% of teeth. Results. Readable radiographs were obtained from 499 individuals. Carotid calcification was identified in 39.1%. Individuals were diagnosed with periodontitis in 18.4%. Data analysis demonstrated that individuals with periodontitis had a higher prevalence of carotid calcifications (Pearson (2) = 4.05 p < 0.05) and with a likelihood of 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0, 2.3, p < 0.05). Conclusions. Data analysis demonstrated a significant association between periodontitis and carotid calcification.

Keywords
Carotid arterial calcifications, panoramic radiographs, periodontitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11932 (URN)10.3109/00016357.2015.1050603 (DOI)000366811600006 ()26066062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-30 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Isehed, C., Holmlund, A., Renvert, S., Svenson, B., Johansson, I. & Lundberg, P. (2016). Effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative on the clinical and microbiological outcomes following surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 43(10), 863-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative on the clinical and microbiological outcomes following surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: A randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 863-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This randomized clinical trial aimed at comparing radiological, clinical and microbial effects of surgical treatment of peri-implantitis alone or in combination with enamel matrix derivative (EMD). Methods: Twenty-six subjects were treated with open flap debridement and decontamination of the implant surfaces with gauze and saline preceding adjunctive EMD or no EMD. Bone level (BL) change was primary outcome and secondary outcomes were changes in pocket depth (PD), plaque, pus, bleeding and the microbiota of the peri-implant biofilm analyzed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray over a time period of 12 months. Results: In multivariate modelling, increased marginal BL at implant site was significantly associated with EMD, the number of osseous walls in the peri-implant bone defect and a Gram+/aerobic microbial flora, whereas reduced BL was associated with a Gram−/anaerobic microbial flora and presence of bleeding and pus, with a cross-validated predictive capacity (Q2) of 36.4%. Similar, but statistically non-significant, trends were seen for BL, PD, plaque, pus and bleeding in univariate analysis. Conclusion: Adjunctive EMD to surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was associated with prevalence of Gram+/aerobic bacteria during the follow-up period and increased marginal BL 12 months after treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
bone level; EMD treatment; microbiota; peri-implantitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13080 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.12583 (DOI)000388357000008 ()2-s2.0-84985896606 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
Hallström, H., Lindgren, S., Widén, C., Renvert, S. & Twetman, S. (2016). Probiotic supplements and debridement of peri-implant mucositis: A randomized controlled trial. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 74(1), 60-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic supplements and debridement of peri-implant mucositis: A randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The aim of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplements in adjunct to conventional management of peri-implant mucositis. Materials and methods. Forty-nine adult patients with peri-implant mucositis were consecutively recruited after informed consent. After initial mechanical debridement and oral hygiene instructions, the patients received a topical oil application (active or placebo) followed by twice-daily intake of lozenges (active or placebo) for 3 months. The active products contained a mix of two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. Patients were clinically monitored and sampled at baseline and after 1, 2, 4, 12 and 26 weeks. The clinical end-points were pocket-probing depth (PPD), plaque index (PI) and bleeding on probing (BOP). In addition, the subgingival microbiota was processed with checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization and samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were analyzed for selected cytokines with the aid of multiplex immunoassays. Results. After 4 and 12 weeks, all clinical parameters were improved in both the test and the placebo group. PPD and BOP were significantly reduced compared with baseline (p < 0.05), but no significant differences were displayed between the groups. The clinical improvements persisted 3 months after the intervention. No major alterations of the subgingival microflora were disclosed and the levels of inflammatory mediators in GCF did not differ between the groups. Conclusions. Mechanical debridement and oral hygiene reinforcement resulted in clinical improvement of peri-implant mucositis and a reduction in cytokine levels. Probiotic supplements did not provide added benefit to placebo. © 2015 Informa Healthcare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Cytokines; gingival crevicular fluid; lactobacilli; lozenges; subgingival bacteria
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11574 (URN)10.3109/00016357.2015.1040065 (DOI)000374107500007 ()2-s2.0-84946214132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-03 Created: 2016-02-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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