Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Andersson, Martin
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Minniti, M., Andersson, M., Braunerhjelm, P., Delmar, F., Rickne, A., Thorburn, K., . . . Stenkula, M. (2019). Boyan Jovanovic: recipient of the 2019 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research. Small Business Economics, 53(3), 547-553
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boyan Jovanovic: recipient of the 2019 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 547-553Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The 2019 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research has been awarded to Professor Boyan Jovanovic at New York University in the USA. Boyan Jovanovic has developed pioneering research that advances our understanding of the competitive dynamics between incumbent firms and new entrants, entrepreneurial learning and selection processes, and the importance of entrepreneurship for the economy. Key perspectives in his research are that the entrepreneur makes employment choices based on the comparative advantage of his or her skills and that entrepreneurial firms are vehicles of technological change and knowledge diffusion that influence industry dynamics and, in turn, economic growth. © 2019, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer New York LLC, 2019
Keywords
Competition, Entrepreneurial learning, Entrepreneurship, Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research, Industrial dynamics, Selection
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-18647 (URN)10.1007/s11187-019-00233-x (DOI)000486043300001 ()2-s2.0-85071011980 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Lindholm-Dahlstrand, Å., Andersson, M. & Carlsson, B. (2019). Entrepreneurial experimentation: a key function in systems of innovation. Small Business Economics, 53(3), 591-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurial experimentation: a key function in systems of innovation
2019 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 591-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on innovation systems focuses on the supply side (the creation of technology) rather than on how innovations are converted into economic activity and growth via the market (the demand side, and the interface between supply and demand). One implication of this is that there is a dearth of research on the links between innovation systems and economic growth. The purpose of this paper is to begin to fill this gap in the literature. We articulate the function of entrepreneurial experimentation as an essential mechanism for translating new knowledge into economic activity and growth created in innovation systems. We argue that entrepreneurial experimentation comprises both “technical” and “market” experimentation. Spinoffs and acquisitions are proposed as micro-mechanisms that give rise to system-wide entrepreneurial experimentation. Our framework suggests that entrepreneurial experimentation is central in driving both the supply- and the demand-side dynamics of innovation systems, hence linking both innovation systems and entrepreneurship to economic growth. © 2018 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer New York LLC, 2019
Keywords
Economic growth, Entrepreneurship, Experimentation, Innovation system, New technology-based firms, Scale-up
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16886 (URN)10.1007/s11187-018-0072-y (DOI)000486043300004 ()2-s2.0-85049561654 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access

Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2019-10-09
Andersson, M., Larsson, J. & Wernberg, J. (2019). The economic microgeography of diversity and specialization externalities: firm-level evidence from Swedish cities. Research Policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The economic microgeography of diversity and specialization externalities: firm-level evidence from Swedish cities
2019 (English)In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We employ finely geo-coded firm-level panel data to assess the long-standing question whether agglomeration economies derive from specialization (within-industry), diversity (between-industry) or overall density. Rather than treating the city as a single unit, we focus our analysis on how the inner industry structures of cities influence firm-level productivity. Our results illustrate the co-existence of several externalities that differ in their spatial distribution and attenuation within cities. First, we find robust positive effects of neighborhood-level specialization on TFP as well as a small effect of diversity at the same fine spatial level. These effects are highly localized and dissipate beyond the immediate within-city neighborhood level. Second, we also find that firms benefit from the overall density of the wider city. The results emphasize the relevance of “opening up” cities to study the workings of their inner organization and support the idea that location in a within-city industry cluster in a diversified and dense city boosts productivity. © 2019

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Agglomeration economies, Attenuation, Diversity, Externalities, Geocoding, Knowledge spillovers, Productivity, Specialization, Agglomeration, Geo coding, Industrial economics
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17707 (URN)10.1016/j.respol.2019.02.003 (DOI)2-s2.0-85061793039 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Ahlin, L., Andersson, M. & Thulin, P. (2018). Human capital sorting: The "when" and "who" of the sorting of educated workers to urban regions. Journal of regional science, 58(3), 581-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human capital sorting: The "when" and "who" of the sorting of educated workers to urban regions
2018 (English)In: Journal of regional science, ISSN 0022-4146, E-ISSN 1467-9787, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 581-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sorting of high-ability workers is often advanced as one source of spatial disparities in economic outcomes. There are still few papers that analyze when human capital sorting occurs and whom it involves. Using data on 16 cohorts of university graduates in Sweden, we demonstrate significant sorting to urban regions on high school grades and education levels of parents, i.e., two attributes typically associated with latent abilities that are valued in the labor market. A large part of this sorting has already occurred in deciding where to study, because the top universities in Sweden are predominantly located in urban regions. The largest part of directed sorting on ability indicators occurs in the decision of where to study. Even after controlling for sorting prior to labor market entry, the best and brightest are still more likely to start working in urban regions. However, this effect appears to be driven by Sweden's main metropolitan region, Stockholm. We find no influence of our ability indicators on the probability of starting to work in urban regions after graduation when Stockholm is excluded. Studies of human capital sorting need to account for selection processes to and from universities, because neglecting mobility prior to labor market entry is likely to lead to an underestimation of the extent of the sorting to urban regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
ability, geography of talent, human capital, labor mobility, migration, spatial selection, spatial sorting, university graduates
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16630 (URN)10.1111/jors.12366 (DOI)000434277600004 ()
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Xiao, J., Boschma, R. & Andersson, M. (2018). Industrial Diversification in Europe: The Differentiated Role of Relatedness. Economic Geography, 94(5), 514-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial Diversification in Europe: The Differentiated Role of Relatedness
2018 (English)In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 514-549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is increasing interest in the drivers of industrial diversification, and how these depend on economic and industry structures. This article contributes to this line of inquiry by analyzing the role of industry relatedness in explaining variations in industry diversification, measured as the entry of new industry specializations, across 173 European regions during the period 2004-2012. First, we show that there are significant differences across regions in Europe in terms of industrial diversification. Second, we provide robust evidence showing that the probability that a new industry specialization develops in a region is positively associated with the new industry's relatedness to the region's current industries. Third, a novel finding is that the influence of relatedness on the probability of new industrial specializations depends on innovation capacity of a region. We find that relatedness is a more important driver of diversification in regions with a weaker innovation capacity. The effect of relatedness appears to decrease monotonically as the innovation capacity of a regional economy increases. This is consistent with the argument that high innovation capacity allows an economy to break from its past and to develop, for the economy, truly new industry specializations. We infer from this that innovation capacity is a critical factor for economic resilience and diversification capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
industrial diversification, related diversification, evolutionary economic geography, unrelated diversification, European regions, resilience
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17194 (URN)10.1080/00130095.2018.1444989 (DOI)000447588100003 ()
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2018-11-02Bibliographically approved
Xiao, J., Boschma, R. & Andersson, M. (2018). Resilience in the European Union: the effect of the 2008 crisis on the ability of regions in Europe to develop new industrial specializations. Industrial and Corporate Change, 27(1), 15-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience in the European Union: the effect of the 2008 crisis on the ability of regions in Europe to develop new industrial specializations
2018 (English)In: Industrial and Corporate Change, ISSN 0960-6491, E-ISSN 1464-3650, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 15-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article adopts an evolutionary framework to the study of industrial resilience. We present a study on European regions and assess the extent to which the capacity of their economies to develop new industrial specializations is affected by the global economic crisis of 2008. We compare levels of industry entry in European regions in the period 2004-2008 and 2008-2012, i.e. before and after a major economic disturbance. Resilient regions are defined as regions that show high entry levels or even increase their entry levels after the shock. Related and unrelated variety exhibit a positive effect on regional resilience, especially on the entry of knowledge-intensive industries after the shock.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
Keywords
SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY; ECONOMIC RESILIENCE; GROWTH; RELATEDNESS; VARIETY; AGGLOMERATION; ADAPTABILITY; PERSPECTIVE; COUNTRIES; NETWORKS
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15914 (URN)10.1093/icc/dtx023 (DOI)000424141700002 ()
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Lavesson, N. & Niedomysl, T. (2018). Rural to urban long-distance commuting in Sweden: Trends, characteristics and pathways. Journal of Rural Studies, 59, 67-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural to urban long-distance commuting in Sweden: Trends, characteristics and pathways
2018 (English)In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 59, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rise of ICT and the shift toward jobs with more flexibility in working hours and places of work sparked popular debates about potential for a ‘rural renaissance’. A key argument was that there are increasing possibilities to live in the countryside while being employed in large cities. This paper uses data spanning two decades to examine trends in and characteristics of employee–employer ties between rural and urban areas in Sweden. Our main results suggest that rural-to-urban long-distance commuting is rapidly increasing, but not as fast as commuting flows elsewhere. Compared to the rural population at large, rural residents working in large cities constitute a strongly selected group of workers who are well paid, have long educations, are young and also have advanced knowledge-intensive occupations. Only about 30 percent of those who become rural-to-urban long-distance commuters have moved from urban areas; the vast majority constitute those who already lived in rural areas before starting to commute to urban areas. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
ICT, Long-distance commuting, Spatial interdependencies, Sweden, Urban–rural integration, commuting, rural area, rural-urban comparison, spatial variation, trend analysis
National Category
Business Administration Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16019 (URN)10.1016/j.jrurstud.2018.01.010 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042284086 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Ghani, Z., Jarl, J., Sanmartin Berglund, J., Andersson, M. & Anderberg, P. (2018). The Cost Effectiveness of M-health Interventions for Older Adults: Protocol for a Systematic Review.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cost Effectiveness of M-health Interventions for Older Adults: Protocol for a Systematic Review
Show others...
2018 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Many studies reported effectiveness of mhealth interventions targeting middle aged and older adults to improve healthcare delivery process, efficacy and management of chronic diseases. However, the knowledge about their cost-effectiveness is important to implement mhealth interventions at large scale for proper allocation of scarce resources. This systematic review will summarize the results from identified studies for the cost effectiveness of mhealth interventions aimed for middle aged and older adults.

Method: mhealth interventions aimed to improve healthcare delivery process, efficacy and delivering training will be included in this systematic review. A comprehensive electronic search strategy will be used to identify health economic evaluations, published since 2007, and indexed in Pubmed, Scopus and CINAHL. The search strategy will include terms (and synonyms) for the following mhealth devices: mobile phone, smartphone, mhealth. Middle aged and older adults will be used to identify all mhealth interventions introduced to middle aged and older adults. Terms such as economic evaluation, cost effectiveness, cost utility etc will be used to identify economic evaluations of all mhealth interventions.

Discussion: This systematic review will report evidence on cost effectiveness of mhealth interventions targeting middle aged and older adults.

National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16624 (URN)
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Larsson, J. & Wernberg, J. (2018). Urban preferences, amenities and age: Exploring the spatial distribution of age in Stockholm from 1991 to 2011. Regional Science Policy & Practice, 10(4), 367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban preferences, amenities and age: Exploring the spatial distribution of age in Stockholm from 1991 to 2011
2018 (English)In: Regional Science Policy & Practice, E-ISSN 1757-7802, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 367-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities exhibit a rich and complex heterogeneity in people and activities. This poses a sizable challenge for planners when planning new neighbourhoods or the reconstruction of old ones as well as when considering the allocation of supply of and demand for amenities, e.g. kindergartens or health facilities. However, individual preferences may also exhibit common denominators that may provide structure to this heterogeneity. One such denominator is age. In this paper we introduce the concept of neighbourhood age, defined as the mean age of people living in exogenously defined squares of 1km2 in a city. We use highly disaggregated geocoded data to map how the spatial distribution of neighbourhood age changes over a 20-year period from 1991 to 2011 in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. We then test the correlation between neighbourhood age and two categories of urban amenities: supply of local consumption amenities and distance to the city's central business district (CBD). The paper presents three main findings: First, neighbourhood age changes and polarizes significantly over the observed period, suggesting that different age groups are concentrating in different parts of the city. Second, there is a rejuvenation in the central parts of the city but also in more distant clusters of amenities. Third, over a long-term perspective, the results suggest that local clusters of consumption amenities outside the inner city may become increasingly attractive to younger people. Our conclusion is that neighbourhood age and age-related patterns over time provides a tool for planners to better understand the spatial distribution of age-related demand. © 2018 The Author(s). Regional Science Policy and Practice © 2018 RSAI

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
changes, development, land use patterns, regional economic activity: growth, size and spatial distributions of regional economic activity
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17274 (URN)10.1111/rsp3.12150 (DOI)000451337900009 ()2-s2.0-85055474118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Koster, S. & Andersson, M. (2018). When is your experience valuable?: Occupation-industry transitions and self-employment success. Journal of evolutionary economics, 28(2), 265-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When is your experience valuable?: Occupation-industry transitions and self-employment success
2018 (English)In: Journal of evolutionary economics, ISSN 0936-9937, E-ISSN 1432-1386, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 265-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on employee spinoffs has, for a long time, stressed the importance of industry-specific skills and experiences in explaining the success of new firms. We argue that employees also develop skills that are associated with their occupation within an industry, and that success as an entrepreneur, therefore, is also contingent on the relation between the entrepreneurs’ previous occupation and the industry in which they operate as self-employed. Using matched employer-employee data, we develop a measure, occupational spin-offs, that accounts for this relation. An occupational spin-off is defined as a start-up in the most common industry, given the previous occupation of the founder. We then show that entrepreneurs starting occupational spinoffs enjoy above average income from self-employment and have longer spells as business owners. © 2017 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer New York LLC, 2018
Keywords
Entrepreneurship, Experience, Human capital, Occupational choice, Self-employment, Skills, Spin-offs
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15094 (URN)10.1007/s00191-017-0528-2 (DOI)000428562800004 ()2-s2.0-85027839591 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-01 Created: 2017-09-01 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications