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Broman, Göran
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Gould, R., Bratt, C., Svensson, M. & Broman, G. (2018). Shrinking and scaffolding: supporting behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shrinking and scaffolding: supporting behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design
2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

To start to include sustainability in a design project is a transition. This transition requires change in how people do things, that is, behaviour change, and it takes place in the midst of the usual pressures of product design. Prior research on sustainable design has mostly explored the so-called technical side – identifying what tasks should be performed, such as specifics of including sustainability criteria when analysing product concepts. Recent studies have advocated the consideration of the human nature of the people who are to implement these ‘technical’ tasks, to undergo and drive the transition.

We therefore embarked on an action research project to support behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design in the individual members of design project teams. Our action research partner was a design consultancy who wanted to begin working with sustainable design. Our research question was: How might the partner organisation support individual behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design?

Firstly, we identified some barriers to behaviour change; these barriers were related to motivation, capability and opportunity to apply sustainable design. Secondly, to investigate how to address the barriers and support individual behaviour change, we integrated concepts on behaviour change, motivation, learning for sustainability and climate communication to form a conceptual system (a theoretical model). In parallel, we undertook a participatory action research project with the consultancy, where we iteratively and collaboratively employed our model to develop ideas for specific actions that the organisation could take. We also tried out some of these actions and observed the outcomes.

We learnt that it is important to not just define what ‘technical’ tasks project teams should ideally perform, but to also scaffold the journey as a series of simpler steps. Shrinking the ‘technical’ tasks into meaningful steps that are within reach helps individuals to feel confident and competent, which in turn leads to increased intrinsic motivation and behaviour change. Progressively achieving small steps aligned with their values reduces the risk of dissonance and denial, and therefore increases the potential for action.

In this article, we present our model and our learnings.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17038 (URN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Broman, G. & Robèrt, K.-H. (2017). A framework for strategic sustainable development. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Part 1), 17-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A framework for strategic sustainable development
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 17-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to give a comprehensive and cohesive description of the most recent version of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD), and also to describe and discuss the overall method for developing the FSSD, elaborate on the general rational for and general benefits of a framework of this type, and Validate benefits of the FSSD through examples of its application. The purpose is also to point to pertinent future work. In preparation of this paper, we have reviewed previous publications and other documents related to the FSSD and reflected on the 25-year learning process between scientists and practitioners. We conclude that the FSSD has proven to aid organizations in thoroughly understanding and putting themselves in context of the global sustainability challenge, and to move themselves strategically towards sustainability, i.e., to stepwise reduce their negative impacts on ecological and social systems at large while strengthening the own organization through capturing of innovation opportunities, including new business models, exploration of new markets and winning of new market shares, and through reduced risks and operation costs. Specifically, we conclude that the FSSD aids more effective management of system boundaries and trade-offs, makes it possible to model and assess sustainable potentials for various materials and practices before investments are made, and offers the possibility for more effective collaboration across disciplines and sectors, regions, value-chains and stakeholder groups. We also conclude that the FSSD makes it possible to prevent damages, even from yet unknown problems, and not the least, to guide selection, development and combination of supplementary methods, tools, and other forms of support, which makes it possible to increase their utility for strategic sustainable development. Finally, we have shown that the FSSD is useful for structuring transdisciplinary academic education and research. Several examples of ongoing FSSD related research, as well as ideas for future work, are given. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
Keywords
Backcasting, FSSD, Strategic sustainable development, Sustainability principles, Sustainability science
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15163 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.10.121 (DOI)000388775100003 ()
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2017-09-22Bibliographically approved
Missimer, M., Robèrt, K.-H. & Broman, G. (2017). A Strategic Approach to Social Sustainability - Part 2: A Principle-based Definition. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Part 1), 42-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Strategic Approach to Social Sustainability - Part 2: A Principle-based Definition
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The vast and growing array of concepts, methods and tools in the sustainability field imply a need for a structuring and coordinating framework, including a unifying and operational definition of sustainability. One attempt at such framework began over 25 years ago and is now widely known as the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. However, as with the larger sustainability field, the social dimension of this framework has been found to not be sufficiently science-based and operational and thus in need of further development. In this two-part series an attempt at a science-based, operational definition of social sustainability is presented. In part 1 a systems-based approach to the social system was presented, based on extensive literature studies as well as conceptual modelling sessions using the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development as the guiding structure. The focus of that study was on the essential aspects of the social system that need to be sustained, namely trust, common meaning, diversity, capacity for learning and capacity for self-organization. The aim of this second paper is to identify and present overriding mechanisms by which these aspects of the social system can be degraded, thereby finding exclusion criteria for re-design for sustainability. Further literature studies, conceptual modelling sessions and initial testing of this prototype with partners in academia, business and NGOs were performed. Based on the understanding of the essential aspects of the social system and the identified overriding mechanisms of degradation of these, a hypothesis for a definition of social sustainability by basic principles is presented. The proposed principles are that in a socially sustainable society, people are not subject to structural obstacles to: (1) health, (2) influence, (3) competence, (4) impartiality and (5) meaning-making. Overall, the two papers aim to provide a hypothesis for a definition of social sustainability, which is general enough to be applied irrespective of spatial and temporal constraints, but concrete enough to guide decision-making and monitoring. It is also a further development of the social dimension of the FSSD, which practitioners and researchers have requested for some time and can act as a support towards better integration of social sustainability in many other fields, e.g., sustainable product innovation, sustainable supply chain management, sustainable transport system development, and others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
strategic sustainable development; social sustainability; social system; systems thinking; sustainability principles.
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11907 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.04.059 (DOI)000388775100005 ()
Note

Financial support was provided by the FUTURA foundation and is hereby gratefully acknowledged. FUTURA was not involved in the study design, the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, in the writing of the report or in the decision to submit the article for publication.

Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved
Missimer, M., Robèrt, K.-H. & Broman, G. (2017). A Strategic Approach to Social Sustainability -Part 1: Exploring the Social System. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Part 1), 32-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Strategic Approach to Social Sustainability -Part 1: Exploring the Social System
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The vast and growing array of concepts, methods and tools in the sustainability field imply a need for a structuring and coordinating framework, including a unifying and operational definition of sustainability. One attempt at such framework began over 25 years ago and is now widely known as the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. However, as with the larger sustainability field, the social dimension of this framework has been found to not be sufficiently science-based and operational and thus in need of further development. In this two-part series an attempt at a science-based, operational definition of social sustainability is presented. In this paper (part one), a systems-based approach to the social system is presented, as a basis for presenting a zero-hypothesis of principles for social sustainability in part two. Extensive literature studies as well as conceptual modeling sessions were performed and the social system was examined from various angles – complex adaptive system studies, human needs theory and other social sciences, and insights from these fields were woven together. The whole work was structured and guided by the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. The focus of the study was on the essential aspects of the social system that need to be sustained (that cannot be systematically degraded) for it to be possible for people to meet their needs. These essential aspects were found to be trust, common meaning, diversity, capacity for learning and capacity for self-organization. Trust seems to be generally acknowledged to be the overriding aspect of a vital social system. A sense of common meaning is also stated by several authors as an important part of social capital and something that helps to keep a group or society together. Diversity is acknowledged as essential for resilience; in the human social system this can be interpreted as, e.g., diversity of personalities, ages, gender, skills. Capacity for learning and self-organization are also motivated from a resilience point of view by several authors. These results form a basis for the hypothesis for a definition of social sustainability presented in paper 2, which in turn is a step towards creating an enhanced support for strategic planning and innovation for sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
strategic sustainable development; social sustainability; social system; systems thinking; sustainability principles
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11906 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.03.170 (DOI)000388775100004 ()
Note

Financial support was provided by the FUTURA foundation and is hereby gratefully acknowledged. FUTURA was not involved in the study design, the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, in the writing of the report or in the decision to submit the article for publication.

Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved
Robèrt, K.-H., Borén, S., Ny, H. & Broman, G. (2017). A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 1: attempting a generic community planning process model. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Part 1), 53-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 1: attempting a generic community planning process model
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electric vehicles seem to offer a great potential for sustainable transport development. The Swedish pioneer project GreenCharge Southeast is designed as a cooperative action research approach that aims to explore a roadmap for a fossil-free transport system by 2030 with a focus on electric vehicles. It is the following combination of objectives that puts demand on a new process model adapted for cross-sector and cross-disciplinary cooperation: (i) a fossil-free transport system in Sweden by 2030 and, to avoid sub-optimizations in the transport sector, (ii) assuring that solutions that support (i) also serve other aspects of sustainability in the transport sector and, to avoid that sustainable solutions in the transport sector block sustainable solutions in other sectors, (iii) assuring cohesive creativity across sectors and groups of experts and stakeholders. The new process model was applied in an action-research mode for the exploration of electric vehicles within a fully sustainable transport system to test the functionality of the model in support of its development. To deliver on the above combination of objectives, a framework was needed with principles for sustainability that are universal for any sector as boundary conditions for redesign, and with guidelines for how any organization or sector can create economically feasible step- by-step transition plans. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) is designed to serve such purposes and therefore is embedded into the new process model. The exploration of this new model also helped to identify four interdependent planning perspectives (‘Resource base’, ‘Spatial’, ‘Technical’ and ‘Governance’) that should be represented by the respective experts and stakeholders using the model. In general, the new process model proved helpful by giving diverse stakeholders with various competences and representing various planning perspectives a common, robust, and easy-to- understand goal and a way of working that was adequate for each of their contexts. Furthermore, the evolving process model likely is relevant and useful not only for transport planning and electric vehicles, but for any other societal sector as well and thus for sustainable community planning in general. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Sustainability, Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, FSSD, Traffic, Transport, Strategic planning
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11713 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.02.054 (DOI)000388775100006 ()
Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Borén, S., Nurhadi, L., Ny, H., Robèrt, K.-H., Broman, G. & Trygg, L. (2017). A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 2: the case of a vision for electric vehicle systems in Southeast Sweden. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140(Part 1), 62-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 2: the case of a vision for electric vehicle systems in Southeast Sweden
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electric vehicles seem to offer a great potential for sustainable transport development. The Swedish pioneer project GreenCharge Southeast is designed as a cooperative action research approach that aims to explore a roadmap for a fossil-free transport system by 2030 with a focus on electric vehicles. In the first paper of this tandem publication, the authors propose a new generic process model embedding the Framework of Strategic Sustainable Development. The purpose of applying it in an action-research mode as described in this paper was twofold: (i) to develop a vision for sustainable regional transport and a coarse roadmap towards that vision, and, while doing so, (ii) get additional empirical experiences to inform the development of the new generic process model. Experts from many sectors and organizations involved in the GreenCharge project provided vital information and reviewed all planning perspectives presented in Paper 1 in two sequential multi-stakeholder seminars. The results include a sustainable vision for electric vehicle systems in southeast Sweden within a sustainable regional transport system within a sustainable global society, as well as an initial development plan towards such a vision for the transport sector. The vision is framed by the universal sustainability principles, and the development plan is informed by the strategic guidelines, of the above-mentioned framework. Among other things, the vision and plan imply a shift to renewable energy and a more optimized use of areas and thus a new type of spatial planning. For example, the vision and plan implies a lower built-in demand for transport, more integrated traffic modes, and more multi-functional use of areas for energy and transport infrastructures, for example. Some inherent benefits of electric vehicles are highlighted in the vision and plan, including near-zero local emissions and flexibility as regards primary energy sources. The vision and plan also imply improved governance for more effective cross-sector collaboration to ensure coor- dinated development within the transport sector and between the transportation sector and other relevant sectors. Meanwhile, the new generic process model was refined and is ready to be applied and further tested in the GreenCharge project and in other projects within the transport sector as well as other sectors. The study confirmed that the new generic process model suggested in support of sus- tainable transport system and community development is helpful for giving diverse stakeholders, with various specialties and perspectives, a way of working that is goal-oriented and builds on effective, iterative learning loops and co-creation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Sustainability, Cross-sector, Traffic, Electric vehicles, Strategic planning, Vision
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11714 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.02.055 (DOI)000388775100007 ()
Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
França, C.-L., Broman, G., Robèrt, K.-H., Basile, G. & Trygg, L. (2017). An approach to business model innovation and design for strategic sustainable development. Journal of Cleaner Production, 140, 155-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An approach to business model innovation and design for strategic sustainable development
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, p. 155-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Successful business is increasingly about understanding the challenges and opportunities linked to society's transition towards sustainability and, e.g., being able to innovate, design and build business models that are functional in this context. However, current business model innovation and design generally fails to sufficiently embrace the sustainability dimension. Typically, the business case of sustainability is not understood profoundly enough; the planning horizon and system scope are insufficient; the competence to bring together people into systematic ventures towards sustainable business is too low. A unifying framework for sustainability analyses, planning, cross-disciplinary and cross-sector cooperation, and cohesive use of the myriad sustainability tools, methods and concepts has been developed: the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD). Similarly, a generic approach to business model design has been put forward: the Business Model Canvas (BMC). In this paper we explore how the FSSD could inform business model innovation and design by combining it with the BMC and supplementary tools, methods and concepts such as creativity techniques, value network mapping, life-cycle assessment, and product-service systems. The results show that the FSSD-BMC combination can support business model innovation and design for strategic sustainable development, as well as strengthen each supplementary tool, method and concept in its own primary purpose. We apply the combined approach, for the purpose of initial testing and presentation, to a real case of business model evolution. Based on our findings we propose a new approach to business model innovation and design for strategic sustainable development. The new approach facilitates, e.g., business scalability and risk avoidance and clarifies the interplay between classical business model development and strategic sustainability thinking. The new approach highlights the opportunity for novel business model design for future sustainable success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Business model design Strategic sustainable development Sustainable business model Sustainable product-service systems
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13600 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.06.124 (DOI)000388775100016 ()
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Levy Franca, C., Broman, G., Basile, G., Robèrt, K.-H. & Thompson, A. (2017). Exploring the Nexus of Product-Service Systems, Business Models and Sustainability - a need for strategic and practical approaches. Journal of Cleaner Production
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Nexus of Product-Service Systems, Business Models and Sustainability - a need for strategic and practical approaches
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Product-Service Systems (PSS) have been identified as potentially important for addressing sustainability challenges. However, progress has been relatively slow as regards realizing this potential, and a lack of practical approaches to the design of business models capable of supporting implementation of such PSS has been proposed as a partial reason. The aim of this study is to explore connections and the potential functional nexus between the three fields of PSS, Business Models and Sustainability, in pursuit of possible key enablers to further realization of the potential for sustainability-promoting PSS. A systematic review and analysis of the academic literature is performed. The review shows that, although a relatively new and unexplored endeavor, there is growing effort at the interface of the three fields. The review indicates that the main deficit so far is that the PSS and business model fields lack concrete guidelines and practical tools for how to embrace the sustainability dimension in a strategic way. Especially the strategic dimension emerges as a general finding from diverse sources as a potential key enabler for mutual benefits across the three fields. The study thus points to the need for research aiming at developing such guidelines and tools, and also at exploring case-based applications to create experiential knowledge, to fill the gaps in current theory and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
sustainability, strategy, sustainable product-service systems, sustainable business model, systematic literature review, strategic sustainable development.
National Category
Business Administration Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13673 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, L., Callaghan, E., Morley, A. & Broman, G. (2017). Food system sustainability across scales: A proposed local-to-global approach to community planning and assessment. Sustainability, 9(6), Article ID 1061.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food system sustainability across scales: A proposed local-to-global approach to community planning and assessment
2017 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 1061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interest in food systems sustainability is growing, but progress toward them is slow. This research focuses on three interrelated challenges that hinder progress. First, prevailing visions lack a concrete definition of sustainability. Second, global level conceptions fail to guide responses at the local level. Third, these deficiencies may lead to conflicting initiatives for addressing sustainable food systems at the community level that slow collective progress. The purpose of this article is to (1) describe the development of a framework for assessing food system sustainability which accommodates local-level measurement in the context of broader national and global scale measures; and (2) to propose a process that supports community determinacy over localized progress toward sustainable food systems. Using a modified Delphi Inquiry process, we engaged a diverse, global panel of experts in describing "success" with respect to sustainable food systems, today's reality, and identifying key indicators for tracking progress towards success. They were asked to consider scale during the process in order to explore locally relevant themes. Data were analyzed using the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) to facilitate a comprehensive and systematic exploration of key themes and indicators. Key results include a framework of indicator themes that are anchored in a concrete definition of sustainability, stable at national and global scales while remaining flexible at the local scale to accommodate contextual needs. We also propose a process for facilitating community-level planning for food system sustainability that utilizes this indicator framework. The proposed process is based on insights from the research results, as well as from previous research and experience applying the FSSD at a community level; it bears promise for future work to support communities to determine their own pathways, while contributing to a more coordinated whole. © 2017 by the author.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2017
Keywords
Backcasting, Community development, Indicators, Sustainable development, Sustainable food systems
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14901 (URN)10.3390/su9061061 (DOI)000404133200184 ()2-s2.0-85021151663 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access

Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved
Gould, R. K., Bratt, C., Lagun Mesquita, P. & Broman, G. (2017). Integrating sustainable development and design-thinking-based product design. In: : . Paper presented at International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign), Tainan, Taiwan. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating sustainable development and design-thinking-based product design
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this research was to integrate sustainable development and design-thinking-based product design in order that the product design then contributes to society’s transition to a sustainable future. This is an important pursuit since product lifecycles are a major cause of society’s current sustainability challenges. To address this, many authors argue for integrating sustainable development into existing design processes rather than developing stand-alone tools and methods.Through action research with a design consultancy who wanted to start working with sustainable product design, we iterated between three stages: understanding needs, designing action, and trying out the action. The first stage comprised document analysis, focus-group style workshops, a survey and interviews. When designing the actions (enhancements to their design-thinking-based process), we drew on literature on sustainable product design, decision-making for sustainability, and organisational learning and change for sustainability. We also drew on our research partners’ practical experience. The enhanced process was tried out and further developed through feedback, student testing and co-development meetings.The result is an enhanced process where project teams (i) use the outcomes from the inspiration phase of the existing process to choose sustainable design strategies that are relevant for their particular project. Once the teams have chosen which strategies to work with, for example, design for remanufacture, we suggest that they (ii) use the strategies to develop ideation foci/questions that help them explore the design space. The third enhancement is for teams to (iii) compare concepts with respect to sustainability as part of their concept comparison and evaluation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Ecodesign; sustainable product design; design thinking; product development
National Category
Design Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15656 (URN)
Conference
International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign), Tainan, Taiwan
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Best paper award at the conference

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
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