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Berntsson Svensson, Richard
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Alahyari, H., Gorschek, T. & Berntsson Svensson, R. (2019). An exploratory study of waste in software development organizations using agile or lean approaches: A multiple case study at 14 organizations. Information and Software Technology, 107, 78-94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploratory study of waste in software development organizations using agile or lean approaches: A multiple case study at 14 organizations
2019 (English)In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 107, p. 78-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: The principal focus of lean is the identification and elimination of waste from the process with respect to maximizing customer value. Similarly, the purpose of agile is to maximize customer value and minimize unnecessary work and time delays. In both cases the concept of waste is important. Through an empirical study, we explore how waste is approached in agile software development organizations. Objective: This paper explores the concept of waste in agile/lean software development organizations and how it is defined, used, prioritized, reduced, or eliminated in practice Method: The data were collected using semi-structured open-interviews. 23 practitioners from 14 embedded software development organizations were interviewed representing two core roles in each organization. Results: Various wastes, categorized in 10 different categories, were identified by the respondents. From the mentioned wastes, not all were necessarily waste per se but could be symptoms caused by wastes. From the seven wastes of lean, Task-switching was ranked as the most important, and Extra-features, as the least important wastes according to the respondents’ opinion. However, most companies do not have their own or use an established definition of waste, more importantly, very few actively identify or try to eliminate waste in their organizations beyond local initiatives on project level. Conclusion: In order to identify, recognize and eliminate waste, a common understanding, and a joint and holistic view of the concept is needed. It is also important to optimize the whole organization and the whole product, as waste on one level can be important on another, thus sub-optimization should be avoided. Furthermore, to achieve a sustainable and effective waste handling, both the short-term and the long-term perspectives need to be considered. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Agile software development, Lean software development, Non-value adding activities, Waste, Wastes, Empirical studies, Exploratory studies, Long-term perspective, Multiple-case study, Software development organizations, Value adding activities, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17085 (URN)10.1016/j.infsof.2018.08.006 (DOI)000452586900006 ()2-s2.0-85053629776 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Berntsson Svensson, R., Gorschek, T., Bengtsson, P. & Widerberg, J. (2019). BAM: backlog assessment method. In: Lect. Notes Bus. Inf. Process.: . Paper presented at 20th International Conference on Agile Software Development, XP 2019; Montreal; Canada; 21 May 2019 through 25 May (pp. 53-68). Springer Verlag, 355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BAM: backlog assessment method
2019 (English)In: Lect. Notes Bus. Inf. Process., Springer Verlag , 2019, Vol. 355, p. 53-68Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The necessity of software as stand-alone products, and as central parts of non-traditional software products have changed how software products are developed. It started with the introduction of the agile manifesto and has resulted in a change of how software process improvements (SPI) are conducted. Although there are agile SPI methods and several agile practices for evaluating and improving current processes and ways-of-working, no method or practices for evaluating the backlog exists. To address this gap, the Backlog Assessment Method (BAM) was developed and applied in collaboration with Telenor Sweden. BAM enables agile organizations to assess backlogs, and assure that the backlog items are good-enough for their needs and well aligned with the decision process. The results from the validation show that BAM is feasible and relevant in an industrial environment, and it indicates that BAM is useful as a tool to perform analysis of items in a specific backlog. © The Author(s) 2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2019
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348
Keywords
Agile, Backlog assessment method, Case study, Software process assessment, Software process improvement, Process engineering, Agile organizations, Industrial environments, Software process improvements, Software products, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-18010 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-19034-7_4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065868875 (Scopus ID)9783030190330 (ISBN)
Conference
20th International Conference on Agile Software Development, XP 2019; Montreal; Canada; 21 May 2019 through 25 May
Note

open access

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Alahyari, H., Berntsson Svensson, R. & Gorschek, T. (2017). A study of value in agile software development organizations. Journal of Systems and Software, 125, 271-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study of value in agile software development organizations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 125, p. 271-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Agile manifesto focuses on the delivery of valuable software. In Lean, the principles emphasise value, where every activity that does not add value is seen as waste. Despite the strong focus on value, and that the primary critical success factor for software intensive product development lies in the value domain, no empirical study has investigated specifically what value is. This paper presents an empirical study that investigates how value is interpreted and prioritised, and how value is assured and measured. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants from 14 agile software development organisations. The contribution of this study is fourfold. First, it examines how value is perceived amongst agile software development organisations. Second, it compares the perceptions and priorities of the perceived values by domains and roles. Third, it includes an examination of what practices are used to achieve value in industry, and what hinders the achievement of value. Fourth, it characterises what measurements are used to assure, and evaluate value-creation activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Agile software development, Empirical, Value, Societies and institutions, Software design, Critical success factor, Empirical studies, Perceived value, Semi structured interviews, Value creation, Software engineering
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13758 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2016.12.007 (DOI)000395359500017 ()2-s2.0-85007247171 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Gren, L., Berntsson Svensson, R. & Unterkalmsteiner, M. (2017). Is it possible to disregard obsolete requirements?: An initial experiment on a potentially new bias in software effort estimation. In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE/ACM 10th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2017: . Paper presented at 10th IEEE/ACM International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE, Buenes Aires (pp. 56-61). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is it possible to disregard obsolete requirements?: An initial experiment on a potentially new bias in software effort estimation
2017 (English)In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE/ACM 10th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 56-61Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Effort estimation is a complex area in decision-making, and is influenced by a diversity of factors that could increase the estimation error. The effects on effort estimation accuracy of having obsolete requirements in specifications have not yet been studied. This study aims at filling that gap. A total of 150 students were asked to provide effort estimates for different amounts of requirements, and one group was explicitly told to disregard some of the given requirements. The results show that even the extra text instructing participants to exclude requirements in the estimation task, had the subjects give higher estimates. The effect of having obsolete requirements in requirements specifications and backlogs in software effort estimation is not taken into account enough today, and this study provides empirical evidence that it possibly should. We also suggest different psychological explanations to the found effect. © 2017 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017
Keywords
Software engineering, Effort estimates, Effort Estimation, Estimation errors, Psychological explanation, Requirements specifications, Software effort estimation, Specifications
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15045 (URN)10.1109/CHASE.2017.10 (DOI)000414286900009 ()2-s2.0-85025839468 (Scopus ID)9781538640395 (ISBN)
Conference
10th IEEE/ACM International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering, CHASE, Buenes Aires
Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Berntsson Svensson, R. & Regnell, B. (2017). Is role playing in Requirements Engineering Education increasing learning outcome?. Requirements Engineering, 22(4), 475-489
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is role playing in Requirements Engineering Education increasing learning outcome?
2017 (English)In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, E-ISSN 1432-010X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 475-489Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Requirements Engineering has attracted a great deal of attention from researchers and practitioners in recent years. This increasing interest requires academia to provide students with a solid foundation in the subject matter. In Requirements Engineering Education (REE), it is important to cover three fundamental topics: traditional analysis and modeling skills, interviewing skills for requirements elicitation, and writing skills for specifying requirements. REE papers report about using role playing as a pedagogical tool; however, there is a surprising lack of empirical evidence on its utility. In this paper we investigate whether a higher grade in a role playing project have an effect on students’ score in an individual written exam in a Requirements Engineering course. Data are collected from 412 students between the years of 2007 and 2014 at Lund University and Chalmers | University of Gothenburg. The results show that students who received a higher grade in the role playing project scored statistically significant higher in the written exam compared to the students with a lower role playing project grade. © 2016 Springer-Verlag London

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2017
Keywords
Requirements Engineering; Requirements Engineering Education; Role playing
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11865 (URN)10.1007/s00766-016-0248-4 (DOI)000413975100004 ()2-s2.0-84962301496 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Kashfi, P., Feldt, R., Nilsson, A. & Berntsson Svensson, R. (2016). A conceptual ux-aware model of requirements. In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics): . Paper presented at IFIP WG 13.2/13.5 Joint 6th International Conference on Human-Centered Software Engineering, HCSE 2016 and 8th International Conference on Human Error, Safety, and System Development, HESSD 2016; Stockholm; Sweden (pp. 234-245). Springer, 9856 LNCS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A conceptual ux-aware model of requirements
2016 (English)In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), Springer, 2016, Vol. 9856 LNCS, p. 234-245Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

User eXperience (UX) is becoming increasingly important for success of software products. Yet, many companies still face various challenges in their work with UX. Part of these challenges relate to inadequate knowledge and awareness of UX and that current UX models are commonly not practical nor well integrated into existing Software Engineering (SE) models and concepts. Therefore, we present a conceptual UX-aware model of requirements for software development practitioners. This layered model shows the interrelation between UX and functional and quality requirements. The model is developed based on current models of UX and software quality characteristics. Through the model we highlight the main differences between various requirement types in particular essentially subjective and accidentally subjective quality requirements. We also present the result of an initial validation of the model through interviews with 12 practitioners and researchers. Our results show that the model can raise practitioners’ knowledge and awareness of UX in particular in relation to requirement and testing activities. It can also facilitate UX-related communication among stakeholders with different backgrounds. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), ISSN 0302-9743 ; 9856
Keywords
Computer software selection and evaluation; Errors; Safety engineering; Software engineering, Hedonic; Non instrumentals; Non-task-related; Quality requirements; Software Quality; Usability; User experience, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13204 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-44902-9_15 (DOI)000389062800015 ()2-s2.0-84986208138 (Scopus ID)9783319449012 (ISBN)
Conference
IFIP WG 13.2/13.5 Joint 6th International Conference on Human-Centered Software Engineering, HCSE 2016 and 8th International Conference on Human Error, Safety, and System Development, HESSD 2016; Stockholm; Sweden
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Liebel, G., Olaru, A., Lönn, H., Kaijser, H., Rajendran, S., Ingelsson, U. & Berntsson Svensson, R. (2016). Addressing model complexity in automotive system development: Selection of system model elements for allocation of requirements. In: Pires L.F.,Desfray P.,Hammoudi S.,Selic B. (Ed.), MODELSWARD 2016: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development. Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development, MODELSWARD 2016; Rome (pp. 168-175).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing model complexity in automotive system development: Selection of system model elements for allocation of requirements
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2016 (English)In: MODELSWARD 2016: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development / [ed] Pires L.F.,Desfray P.,Hammoudi S.,Selic B., 2016, p. 168-175Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Modern automotive embedded systems are developed by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) together with multiple suppliers. A key problem for a supplier is to allocate an OEM’s requirements specification to their own subsystem design. This is a difficult manual task especially on complex systems and it requires expert knowledge about the system design. To address this problem, this paper presents a design science research to develop and evaluate a Requirements Allocation Assistant tool (RAA). The tool provides functionality to search through and filter requirements and system models to enable efficient requirements allocation even in the presence of complexity. RAA is built on top of the EATOP/Eclipse framework using EAST-ADL as system modelling language. The tool was evaluated and validated during a qualitative usability study with 17 engineers active in the Swedish automotive industry. Key findings are that searching is used to learn about a system, whereas filtering is used to narrow down a set of candidate elements of the system design. Engineers request further support in narrowing down a set of candidate elements and in checking that an allocation is correct.

Keywords
Empirical Research; Requirements Allocation; Requirements Engineering; Requirements Traceability; System Modelling; Tool Design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13199 (URN)2-s2.0-84970016643 (Scopus ID)9789897581687 (ISBN)
Conference
4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development, MODELSWARD 2016; Rome
Note

Conference of 4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development, MODELSWARD 2016 ; Conference Date: 19 February 2016 Through 21 February 2016; Conference Code:119693

Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Kashfi, P., Feldt, R., Nilsson, A. & Berntsson Svensson, R. (2016). Evidence-based Timelines for User eXperience Software Process Improvement Retrospectives. In: 2016 42ND EUROMICRO CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND ADVANCED APPLICATIONS (SEAA): . Paper presented at 42nd Euromicro Conference Series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), AUG 31-SEP 02, 2016, Limassol, CYPRUS (pp. 59-62). IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence-based Timelines for User eXperience Software Process Improvement Retrospectives
2016 (English)In: 2016 42ND EUROMICRO CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND ADVANCED APPLICATIONS (SEAA), IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 59-62Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We performed a retrospective meeting at a case company to reflect on its decade of Software Process Improvement (SPI) activities for enhancing UX integration. We supported the meeting by a pre-generated timeline of the main activities. This approach is a refinement of a similar approach that is used in Agile projects to improve effectiveness and decrease memory bias of retrospective meetings. The method is evaluated through gathering practitioners' view using a questionnaire. We conclude that UX research and practice can benefit from the SPI body of knowledge. We also argue that a cross-section evidence-based timeline retrospective meeting is useful for enhancing UX work in companies, especially for identifying and reflecting on `organizational issues'. This approach also provides a cross-section longitudinal overview of the SPI activities that cannot easily be gained in other common SPI learning approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2016
Keywords
user experience, software process improvement, organizational change, organizational issues, timeline, retrospective, lessons learned, postmortem
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13718 (URN)10.1109/SEAA.2016.14 (DOI)000386649000010 ()978-1-5090-2819-1 (ISBN)
Conference
42nd Euromicro Conference Series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), AUG 31-SEP 02, 2016, Limassol, CYPRUS
Available from: 2017-01-05 Created: 2017-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Berntsson Svensson, R. & Taghavianfar, M. (2015). Selecting creativity techniques for creative requirements: An evaluation of four techniques using creativity workshops. In: 2015 IEEE 23RD INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING CONFERENCE (RE): . Paper presented at IEEE 23rd International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE), Ottawa (pp. 66-75). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selecting creativity techniques for creative requirements: An evaluation of four techniques using creativity workshops
2015 (English)In: 2015 IEEE 23RD INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING CONFERENCE (RE), IEEE, 2015, p. 66-75Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Requirements engineering is recognized as a creative process where stakeholders jointly discover new creative ideas for innovative and novel products that eventually are expressed as requirements. This paper evaluates four different creativity techniques, namely Hall of Fame, Constraint Removal, Brainstorming, and Idea Box, using creativity workshops with students and industry practitioners. In total, 34 creativity workshops were conducted with 90 students from two universities, and 86 industrial practitioners from six companies. The results from this study indicate that Brainstorming can generate by far the most ideas, while Hall of Fame generates most creative ideas. Idea Box generates the least number of ideas, and the least number of creative ideas. Finally, Hall of Fame was the technique that led to the most number of requirements that was included in future releases of the products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2015
Series
International Requirements Engineering Conference, ISSN 2332-6441
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11324 (URN)10.1109/RE.2015.7320409 (DOI)000380435800010 ()978-1-4673-6905-3 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE 23rd International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE), Ottawa
Available from: 2015-12-21 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Ouriques, R., Wnuk, K., Gorschek, T. & Berntsson Svensson, R. Continuous Assimilation of Change in Agile Software Development: An empirical study on the role of the knowledge-based resources.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous Assimilation of Change in Agile Software Development: An empirical study on the role of the knowledge-based resources
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As the software value chain is knowledge-based due to the high dependency on people, the lack of practice to manage knowledge as a resource might jeopardize its application in software development. The resource-based view of the firm provides a different perspective on the utilization of knowledge, assisting the identification of the Knowledge-Based Resources (KBRs) that allow a company to have a continuous readiness to quickly respond to the market changes. To understand how the KBRs support coordination in Agile Software Development (ASD), we applied a grounded theory approach, collecting data from 18 practitioners, coming from five companies. As results, we identified 44 KBRs that were grouped in the Continuous Assimilation Model (CHASM). They support coordination in ASD with continuous assimilation of change which is supported by people’s business analytic perspective and product systemic reasoning. The companies are able to utilize a certain level of their KBRs through social collaboration and team environment/settings. However, the inefficient utilization of these resources results in a significant knowledge loss. Furthermore, CHASM points out areas where practitioners can establish strategies based on the priorities that the companies give to the investigated KBRs, as well as a set of research opportunities for future investigation.

Keywords
Knowledge-based Resources, Agile Software Development, Grounded Theory
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-18506 (URN)
Projects
S.E.R.T. Research Profile
Available from: 2019-08-01 Created: 2019-08-01 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
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