Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Badampudi, Deepika
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Badampudi, D., Wnuk, K., Wohlin, C., Franke, U., Šmite, D. & Cicchetti, A. (2018). A decision-making process-line for selection of software asset origins and components. Journal of Systems and Software, 135, 88-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A decision-making process-line for selection of software asset origins and components
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 135, p. 88-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Selecting sourcing options for software assets and components is an important process that helps companies to gain and keep their competitive advantage. The sourcing options include: in-house, COTS, open source and outsourcing. The objective of this paper is to further refine, extend and validate a solution presented in our previous work. The refinement includes a set of decision-making activities, which are described in the form of a process-line that can be used by decision-makers to build their specific decision-making process. We conducted five case studies in three companies to validate the coverage of the set of decision-making activities. The solution in our previous work was validated in two cases in the first two companies. In the validation, it was observed that no activity in the proposed set was perceived to be missing, although not all activities were conducted and the activities that were conducted were not executed in a specific order. Therefore, the refinement of the solution into a process-line approach increases the flexibility and hence it is better in capturing the differences in the decision-making processes observed in the case studies. The applicability of the process-line was then validated in three case studies in a third company. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Inc., 2018
Keywords
Case study, Component-based software engineering, Decision-making, Competition, Concrete pavements, Open source software, Software engineering, Competitive advantage, Decision makers, Decision making process, Open sources, Selection of software, Software assets, Specific ordering, Decision making
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15512 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2017.09.033 (DOI)000418308800006 ()2-s2.0-85032856583 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Petersen, K., Badampudi, D., Ali Shah, S. M., Wnuk, K., Gorschek, T., Papatheocharous, E., . . . Cicchetti, A. (2018). Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 39(12), 237-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choosing Component Origins for Software Intensive Systems In-house, COTS, OSS or Outsourcing?: A Case Survey
Show others...
2018 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, ISSN 0098-5589, E-ISSN 1939-3520, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 237-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The choice of which software component to use influences the success of a software system. Only a few empirical studies investigate how the choice of components is conducted in industrial practice. This is important to understand to tailor research solutions to the needs of the industry. Existing studies focus on the choice for off-the-shelf (OTS) components. It is, however, also important to understand the implications of the choice of alternative component sourcing options (CSOs), such as outsourcing versus the use of OTS. Previous research has shown that the choice has major implications on the development process as well as on the ability to evolve the system. The objective of this study is to explore how decision making took place in industry to choose among CSOs. Overall, 22 industrial cases have been studied through a case survey. The results show that the solutions specifically for CSO decisions are deterministic and based on optimization approaches. The non-deterministic solutions proposed for architectural group decision making appear to suit the CSO decision making in industry better. Interestingly, the final decision was perceived negatively in nine cases and positively in seven cases, while in the remaining cases it was perceived as neither positive nor negative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2018
Keywords
Decision making; in-house; COTS; OSS; outsourcing
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15909 (URN)10.1109/TSE.2017.2677909 (DOI)000427678400002 ()
Projects
ORION - Decision Support for Component-Based Software Engineering of Cyber-Physical Systems
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2018-02-20 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D. (2017). Reporting Ethics Considerations in Software Engineering Publications. In: 11TH ACM/IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON EMPIRICAL SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND MEASUREMENT (ESEM 2017): . Paper presented at 11th ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement (ESEM), Toronto (pp. 205-210). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reporting Ethics Considerations in Software Engineering Publications
2017 (English)In: 11TH ACM/IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON EMPIRICAL SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND MEASUREMENT (ESEM 2017), IEEE , 2017, p. 205-210Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ethical guidelines of software engineering journals require authors to provide statements related to the conflict of interest and the process of obtaining consent (if human subjects are involved). The objective of this study is to review the reporting of the ethical considerations in Empirical Software Engineering - An International Journal. The results indicate that two out of seven studies reported some ethical information however, not explicitly. The ethical discussions were focussed on anonymity and confidentiality. Ethical aspects such as competence, comprehensibility and vulnerability of the subjects were not discussed in any of the papers reviewed in this study. It is important to not only state that consent was obtained however, the procedure of obtaining consent should be reported to improve the accountability and trust.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2017
Series
International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement, ISSN 1938-6451
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15981 (URN)10.1109/ESEM.2017.32 (DOI)000425929000025 ()978-1-5090-4039-1 (ISBN)
Conference
11th ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement (ESEM), Toronto
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D. & Wohlin, C. (2016). Bayesian Synthesis for Knowledge Translation in Software Engineering: Method and Illustration. In: 2016 42th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA): . Paper presented at Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), Limassol, CYPRUS. IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bayesian Synthesis for Knowledge Translation in Software Engineering: Method and Illustration
2016 (English)In: 2016 42th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), IEEE, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Systematic literature reviews in software engineering are necessary to synthesize evidence from multiple studies to provide knowledge and decision support. However, synthesis methods are underutilized in software engineering research. Moreover, translation of synthesized data (outcomes of a systematic review) to provide recommendations for practitioners is seldom practiced. The objective of this paper is to introduce the use of Bayesian synthesis in software engineering research, in particular to translate research evidence into practice by providing the possibility to combine contextualized expert opinions with research evidence. We adopted the Bayesian synthesis method from health research and customized it to be used in software engineering research. The proposed method is described and illustrated using an example from the literature. Bayesian synthesis provides a systematic approach to incorporate subjective opinions in the synthesis process thereby making the synthesis results more suitable to the context in which they will be applied. Thereby, facilitating the interpretation and translation of knowledge to action/application. None of the synthesis methods used in software engineering allows for the integration of subjective opinions, hence using Bayesian synthesis can add a new dimension to the synthesis process in software engineering research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2016
Series
2016 42th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), ISSN 2376-9505
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11771 (URN)10.1109/SEAA.2016.45 (DOI)000386649000024 ()978-1-5090-2819-1 (ISBN)
Conference
Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications (SEAA), Limassol, CYPRUS
Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D., Claes, W. & Kai, P. (2016). Software Component Decision-making: In-house, OSS, COTS or Outsourcing: A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Systems and Software, 121, 105-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Software Component Decision-making: In-house, OSS, COTS or Outsourcing: A Systematic Literature Review
2016 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 121, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Component-based software systems require decisions on component origins for acquiring components. A component origin is an alternative of where to get a component from. Objective: To identify factors that could influence the decision to choose among different component origins and solutions for decision-making (For example, optimization) in the literature. Method: A systematic review study of peer-reviewed literature has been conducted. Results: In total we included 24 primary studies. The component origins compared were mainly focused on in-house vs. COTS and COTS vs. OSS. We identified 11 factors affecting or influencing the decision to select a component origin. When component origins were compared, there was little evidence on the relative (either positive or negative) effect of a component origin on the factor. Most of the solutions were proposed for in-house vs. COTS selection and time, cost and reliability were the most considered factors in the solutions. Optimization models were the most commonly proposed technique used in the solutions. Conclusion: The topic of choosing component origins is a green field for research, and in great need of empirical comparisons between the component origins, as well of how to decide between different combinations of them.

Keywords
Component-based software engineering; COTS; Decision-making; In-house development; OSS; Outsourcing
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11759 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2016.07.027 (DOI)000384864500008 ()
Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Wohlin, C., Wnuk, K., Šmite, D., Franke, U., Badampudi, D. & Cicchetti, A. (2016). Supporting strategic decision-making for selection of software assets. In: Lamprecht A.-L.,Maglyas A. (Ed.), Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing: . Paper presented at 7th International Conference on Software Business, ICSOB 2016; Ljubljana (pp. 1-15). Springer, 240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting strategic decision-making for selection of software assets
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing / [ed] Lamprecht A.-L.,Maglyas A., Springer, 2016, Vol. 240, p. 1-15Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Companies developing software are constantly striving to gain or keep their competitive advantage on the market. To do so, they should balance what to develop themselves and what to get from elsewhere, which may be software components or software services. These strategic decisions need to be aligned with business objectives and the capabilities and constraints of possible options. These sourcing options include: in-house, COTS, open source and outsourcing. The objective of this paper is to present an approach to support decision-makers in selecting appropriate types of origins in a specific case that maximizes the benefits of the selected business strategy. The approach consists of three descriptive models, as well as a decision process and a knowledge repository. The three models are a decision model that comprises three cornerstones (stakeholders, origins and criteria) and is based on a taxonomy for formulating decision models in this context, and two supporting models (property models and context models). © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348 ; 240
Keywords
Competition; Decision making; Software engineering, Business objectives; Competitive advantage; Component-based software engineering; Knowledge repository; Selection of software; Service-oriented software engineering; Strategic decision making; Strategic decisions, Open source software
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13176 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-40515-5_1 (DOI)000387544500001 ()2-s2.0-84976647803 (Scopus ID)978-331940514-8 (ISBN)
Conference
7th International Conference on Software Business, ICSOB 2016; Ljubljana
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D. (2016). Towards decision-making to choose among different component origins. (Licentiate dissertation). Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards decision-making to choose among different component origins
2016 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Context: The amount of software in solutions provided in various domains is continuously growing. These solutions are a mix of hardware and software solutions, often referred to as software-intensive systems. Companies seek to improve the software development process to avoid delays or cost overruns related to the software development.  

Objective: The overall goal of this thesis is to improve the software development/building process to provide timely, high quality and cost efficient solutions. The objective is to select the origin of the components (in-house, outsource, components off-the-shelf (COTS) or open source software (OSS)) that facilitates the improvement. The system can be built of components from one origin or a combination of two or more (or even all) origins. Selecting a proper origin for a component is important to get the most out of a component and to optimize the development. 

Method: It is necessary to investigate the component origins to make decisions to select among different origins. We conducted a case study to explore the existing challenges in software development.  The next step was to identify factors that influence the choice to select among different component origins through a systematic literature review using a snowballing (SB) strategy and a database (DB) search. Furthermore, a Bayesian synthesis process is proposed to integrate the evidence from literature into practice.  

Results: The results of this thesis indicate that the context of software-intensive systems such as domain regulations hinder the software development improvement. In addition to in-house development, alternative component origins (outsourcing, COTS, and OSS) are being used for software development. Several factors such as time, cost and license implications influence the selection of component origins. Solutions have been proposed to support the decision-making. However, these solutions consider only a subset of factors identified in the literature.   

Conclusions: Each component origin has some advantages and disadvantages. Depending on the scenario, one component origin is more suitable than the others. It is important to investigate the different scenarios and suitability of the component origins, which is recognized as future work of this thesis. In addition, the future work is aimed at providing models to support the decision-making process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, 2016. p. 156
Series
Blekinge Institute of Technology Licentiate Dissertation Series, ISSN 1650-2140 ; 2016:01
Keywords
Component-based software development, component origin, decision-making, snowballing, database search, Bayesian synthesis
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11653 (URN)978-91-7295-323-9 (ISBN)
Presentation
2016-04-13, J1650, Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Karlskrona, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D., Wohlin, C. & Petersen, K. (2015). Experiences from Using Snowballing and Database Searches in Systematic Literature Studies. In: : . Paper presented at Proceedings 19th International Conference on Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering (EASE 2015), Nanjing, China. ACM Press, Article No. 17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences from Using Snowballing and Database Searches in Systematic Literature Studies
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Systematic literature studies are commonly used in software engineering. There are two main ways of conducting the searches for these type of studies; they are snowballing and database searches. In snowballing, the reference list (backward snowballing - BSB) and citations (forward snowballing - FSB) of relevant papers are reviewed to identify new papers whereas in a database search, different databases are searched using predefined search strings to identify new papers. Objective: Snowballing has not been in use as extensively as database search. Hence it is important to evaluate its efficiency and reliability when being used as a search strategy in literature studies. Moreover, it is important to compare it to database searches. Method: In this paper, we applied snowballing in a literature study, and reflected on the outcome. We also compared database search with backward and forward snowballing. Database search and snowballing were conducted independently by different researchers. The searches of our literature study were compared with respect to the efficiency and reliability of the findings. Results: Out of the total number of papers found, snowballing identified 83% of the papers in comparison to 46% of the papers for the database search. Snowballing failed to identify a few relevant papers, which potentially could have been addressed by identifying a more comprehensive start set. Conclusion: The efficiency of snowballing is comparable to database search. It can potentially be more reliable than a database search however, the reliability is highly dependent on the creation of a suitable start set.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2015
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11371 (URN)10.1145/2745802.2745818 (DOI)978-1-4503-3350-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Proceedings 19th International Conference on Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering (EASE 2015), Nanjing, China
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20140218
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D., Fricker, S. & Moreno, A. (2013). Perspectives on Productivity and Delays in Large-Scale Agile Projects. Paper presented at International Conference on Agile Software Development. Paper presented at International Conference on Agile Software Development. Vienna, Austria: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on Productivity and Delays in Large-Scale Agile Projects
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many large and distributed companies run agile projects in development environments that are inconsistent with the original agile ideas. Problems that result from these inconsistencies can affect the productivity of development projects and the timeliness of releases. To be effective in such contexts, the agile ideas need to be adapted. We take an inductive approach for reaching this aim by basing the design of the development process on observations of how context, practices, challenges, and impacts interact. This paper reports the results of an interview study of five agile development projects in an environment that was unfavorable for agile principles. Grounded theory was used to identify the challenges of these projects and how these challenges affected productivity and delays according to the involved project roles. Productivity and delay-influencing factors were discovered that related to requirements creation and use, collaboration, knowledge management, and the application domain. The practitioners’ explanations about the factors' impacts are, on one hand, a rich empirical source for avoiding and mitigating productivity and delay problems and, on the other hand, a good starting point for further research on flexible large-scale development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vienna, Austria: Springer, 2013
Keywords
Inductive process improvement, large-scale agile development, grounded theory.
National Category
Business Administration Human Aspects of ICT Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6363 (URN)000345323500013 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo076F06B9D5822754C1257BC6001D5BFD (Local ID)978-3-642-38313-7 (ISBN)oai:bth.se:forskinfo076F06B9D5822754C1257BC6001D5BFD (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo076F06B9D5822754C1257BC6001D5BFD (OAI)
Conference
International Conference on Agile Software Development
Available from: 2015-05-25 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Badampudi, D., Wohlin, C. & Gorschek, T. Guidelines for Knowledge Translation in Software Engineering.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guidelines for Knowledge Translation in Software Engineering
(English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15968 (URN)
Available from: 2018-03-20 Created: 2018-03-20 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications