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Svensson, Martin
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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Pesämaa, O. & Svensson, M. (2018). Does culture matter?: The role of board efficacy, growth and competitiveness in Western and Asian corporate governance. In: Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett, Tina Wallin (Ed.), Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes: Implications for Regions and Industries (pp. 25-64). Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does culture matter?: The role of board efficacy, growth and competitiveness in Western and Asian corporate governance
2018 (English)In: Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes: Implications for Regions and Industries / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett, Tina Wallin, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2018, p. 25-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2018
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science series
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16188 (URN)10.4337/9781786432483.00007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046506134 (Scopus ID)9781786432483 (ISBN)9781786432476 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Svensson, M. & Pesämaa, O. (2018). How does a caller's anger, fear and sadness affect operators' decisions in emergency calls?. International Review of Social Psychology, 31(1), Article ID 89.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does a caller's anger, fear and sadness affect operators' decisions in emergency calls?
2018 (English)In: International Review of Social Psychology, ISSN 2397-8570, Vol. 31, no 1, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied how emergency operators' interpretation of callers' anger, fear, and sadness influenced emergency assessments in 146 authentic emergency calls. All emergency calls need to be decided on quickly and operators discriminated emotional expressions, by separating fear from other emotions across help need levels. Using path analysis and structural equation modeling, caller's fear, as opposed to expressions of anger and sadness, showed both direct and indirect effects on the intention to provide help. Based on the findings, emergency operators are argued to actively incorporate callers' expressions into emergency decisions, rather than peripherally processing emotional expression. Such findings allow for a discussion on the interpersonal effects of emotional expressions and, more practically, how fast help will be able to arrive to the location of the emergency. © 2018 Ubiquity Press Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ubiquity Press Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Decision making, Emergency helping, Emotions, Judgment, Nonverbal
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16225 (URN)10.5334/irsp.89 (DOI)000435754400002 ()2-s2.0-85046767326 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open Access

Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, M., Bertoni, A. & Maximilian, L. (2018). ON KNOWLEDGE MATURITY AND BIASED NATURE OF STAGED DECISION MAKING IN A HIGH CONSEQUENCE INDUSTRY. In: Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N. (Ed.), Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN: . Paper presented at 15th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik (pp. 465-476). The Design Society, 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ON KNOWLEDGE MATURITY AND BIASED NATURE OF STAGED DECISION MAKING IN A HIGH CONSEQUENCE INDUSTRY
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., The Design Society, 2018, Vol. 1, p. 465-476Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores and problematizes decision-making in a high-consequence industry which is characterized by the stage-gate process. We showcase that decision-makers do not differentiate between the types of knowledge used for modelling decisions and calculation of risks. This makes them susceptible to incorporating cognitive distortions—biases—into the stage-gate process. We conclude by amending the risk for certain kinds of biases with a knowledge maturity framework in order to outline conditions for pragmatic decision making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Design Society, 2018
Keywords
decision making, uncertainty, knowledge maturity, risk management, decision biases
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16233 (URN)10.21278/idc.2018.0480 (DOI)9789537738594 (ISBN)
Conference
15th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik
Projects
Model Driven Development and Decision Support
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Boldt, M., Borg, A., Svensson, M. & Hildeby, J. (2018). Predicting burglars' risk exposure and level of pre-crime preparation using crime scene data. Intelligent Data Analysis, 22(1), 167-190, Article ID IDA 322-3210.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting burglars' risk exposure and level of pre-crime preparation using crime scene data
2018 (English)In: Intelligent Data Analysis, ISSN 1088-467X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 167-190, article id IDA 322-3210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The present study aims to extend current research on how offenders’ modus operandi (MO) can be used in crime linkage, by investigating the possibility to automatically estimate offenders’ risk exposure and level of pre-crime preparation for residential burglaries. Such estimations can assist law enforcement agencies when linking crimes into series and thus provide a more comprehensive understanding of offenders and targets, based on the combined knowledge and evidence collected from different crime scenes. Methods: Two criminal profilers manually rated offenders’ risk exposure and level of pre-crime preparation for 50 burglaries each. In an experiment we then analyzed to what extent 16 machine-learning algorithms could generalize both offenders’ risk exposure and preparation scores from the criminal profilers’ ratings onto 15,598 residential burglaries. All included burglaries contain structured and feature-rich crime descriptions which learning algorithms can use to generalize offenders’ risk and preparation scores from.Results: Two models created by Naïve Bayes-based algorithms showed best performance with an AUC of 0.79 and 0.77 for estimating offenders' risk and preparation scores respectively. These algorithms were significantly better than most, but not all, algorithms. Both scores showed promising distinctiveness between linked series, as well as consistency for crimes within series compared to randomly sampled crimes.Conclusions: Estimating offenders' risk exposure and pre-crime preparation  can complement traditional MO characteristics in the crime linkage process. The estimations are also indicative to function for cross-category crimes that otherwise lack comparable MO. Future work could focus on increasing the number of manually rated offenses as well as fine-tuning the Naïve Bayes algorithm to increase its estimation performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2018
Keywords
Predictive models, Classification, Crime linkage, Offender behavior, Serial crime, Residential burglary
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13935 (URN)10.3233/IDA-163220 (DOI)000426790500009 ()
Available from: 2017-02-21 Created: 2017-02-21 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Svensson, M. & Hällgren, M. (2018). Sensemaking in sensory deprived settings: The role of non-verbal auditory cues for emergency assessment. European Management Journal, 36(3), 306-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensemaking in sensory deprived settings: The role of non-verbal auditory cues for emergency assessment
2018 (English)In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 306-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emergency calls are high-stake situations characterized by volatile and time-critical conditions. The use of the telephone restricts sensory perception to a single modality-hearing-which makes both sensemaking and embodied sensemaking more difficult. Using observations, interviews, and organizational documents, we unveil how attention to the non-verbal cues of callers and their surroundings assists emergency operators to make sense of incoming calls for help. We find that operators use two practices to prioritize the calls: a frame-confirming practice and a frame-modifying practice. The practices are underpinned by configurations of verbal and non-verbal cues, wherein caller's emotional expressions and environmental sounds are both considered as distinct input. The non-verbal focus in this study extends our understanding of first-order sensemaking within the emergency domain but also in other sensory deprived settings in high-consequence industries. The contributions of this analysis to sensemaking research reside in the revelation that non-verbal cues contextualize and consequently frame the discursive elements of sensemaking. More specifically, this research offers the insight that embodies sensemaking benefits from attention being given to callers' non-verbal cues, rather than valuing only one's own bodily experiences and mere verbal descriptions about events. © 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Call center, Emergency, Emotion, Materiality, Sensemaking
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15190 (URN)10.1016/j.emj.2017.08.004 (DOI)000434001100002 ()2-s2.0-85028840489 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Gould, R., Bratt, C., Svensson, M. & Broman, G. (2018). Shrinking and scaffolding: supporting behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shrinking and scaffolding: supporting behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design
2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

To start to include sustainability in a design project is a transition. This transition requires change in how people do things, that is, behaviour change, and it takes place in the midst of the usual pressures of product design. Prior research on sustainable design has mostly explored the so-called technical side – identifying what tasks should be performed, such as specifics of including sustainability criteria when analysing product concepts. Recent studies have advocated the consideration of the human nature of the people who are to implement these ‘technical’ tasks, to undergo and drive the transition.

We therefore embarked on an action research project to support behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design in the individual members of design project teams. Our action research partner was a design consultancy who wanted to begin working with sustainable design. Our research question was: How might the partner organisation support individual behaviour change towards implementing sustainable design?

Firstly, we identified some barriers to behaviour change; these barriers were related to motivation, capability and opportunity to apply sustainable design. Secondly, to investigate how to address the barriers and support individual behaviour change, we integrated concepts on behaviour change, motivation, learning for sustainability and climate communication to form a conceptual system (a theoretical model). In parallel, we undertook a participatory action research project with the consultancy, where we iteratively and collaboratively employed our model to develop ideas for specific actions that the organisation could take. We also tried out some of these actions and observed the outcomes.

We learnt that it is important to not just define what ‘technical’ tasks project teams should ideally perform, but to also scaffold the journey as a series of simpler steps. Shrinking the ‘technical’ tasks into meaningful steps that are within reach helps individuals to feel confident and competent, which in turn leads to increased intrinsic motivation and behaviour change. Progressively achieving small steps aligned with their values reduces the risk of dissonance and denial, and therefore increases the potential for action.

In this article, we present our model and our learnings.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17038 (URN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Gould, R. & Svensson, M. (2018). Sustainable product development and tricks on the mind: Formulating conceptual models of cognitive illusions and mitigating actions.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable product development and tricks on the mind: Formulating conceptual models of cognitive illusions and mitigating actions
2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Similar to visual illusions playing tricks on your eyes, cognitive illusions cause you to misjudge reality and therefore potentially make biased decisions. You are especially vulnerable when starting to introduce sustainability into concept development decision-making since this setting offers unfamiliarity, and complexity. Given a shortage of theories regarding which cognitive illusions product developers are susceptible to, we formulated a conceptual model. This model is based on the decision-making tasks that product developers undertake when they are developing concepts and the conditions that they experience when integrating sustainability into this decision-making. From decision-making literature, we identified the following cognitive illusions as occurring when undertaking those tasks under those conditions: availability, anchoring and confirmation bias when generating ideas; illusory correlation and validity effect when selecting between ideas; evaluability bias and status quo bias when gate reviewing. Based on the model, we synthesised literature on how to mitigate for the identified illusions and organised this synthesis according to when (during which task type) a product developer should perform the mitigating actions. These mitigating actions vary according to task type and focus on the quality of the decision-making process.

Keywords
the soft side of ecodesign; sustainable product development; sustainable design; decision-making; cognitive illusions; fallacies and biases in decision-making
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17037 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Netz, J., Svensson, M. & Brundin, E. (2015). Adaptive strategizing: The role of affective expressions for effective crisis management.. In: Academy of Management Proceedings: . Paper presented at Academy of Management, 7-11th of August, Vancouver, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptive strategizing: The role of affective expressions for effective crisis management.
2015 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study sets out to investigate the role of affectivity in crisis management groups and its connection to effective crisis management. We studied the affective reactions in 23 crisis management groups in a major global corporation that participated in a global training program of crisis management. Our results elucidate a condition of asymmetrical affectivity, where positive expressions are associated with negative outcomes and negative expressions are associated with positive outcomes when groups commit to making sense of a crisis. These patterns were moderated by prior crisis experience at the organizational level as well as managerial behavior at the individual level. To explain this multi-level and dynamic complexity of crisis management effectiveness, we theorize a model of adaptive strategizing building on the strategy-as-practice perspective. The model contributes to the strategic management literature on organizational crisis, and especially the stream that focuses on social-emotional aspects of crisis management, by explaining why some organizations’ crisis management groups strategize more effectively than others.

Keywords
affectivity, crisis management, strategizing
National Category
Business Administration Applied Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11743 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2015.18451abstract (DOI)
Conference
Academy of Management, 7-11th of August, Vancouver, Canada
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Biedenbach, T., Svensson, M. & Hällgren, M. (2015). Blissful ignorance: The transfer of responsibility in response to lack of competence. In: : . Paper presented at Seventh International Symposium on Process Organization Studies, Kos, Greece.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blissful ignorance: The transfer of responsibility in response to lack of competence
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-11742 (URN)
Conference
Seventh International Symposium on Process Organization Studies, Kos, Greece
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Svensson, M. & Gould, R. (2015). Hurdles to Clear: Cognitive Barriers in Sustainable Product Development. In: : . Paper presented at The 23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference, Copenhagen.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hurdles to Clear: Cognitive Barriers in Sustainable Product Development
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Product development is a phased decision making process that is difficult to manage, for example, due to lack of knowledge in the early phases when design freedom is high. The management becomes even more challenging when adding the new, complex and potentially long range considerations of sustainability to decision making in product development.

More explicitly, the management challenge is manifested in that product developers initially know little about the design problem, which is when they have highest design freedom. Later, when the product developers have acquired more knowledge about the design problem, design freedom has diminished. In sum, this paradox illustrates two challenging situations in which product developers undertake decision-making – low knowledge and high freedom, and higher knowledge and lower freedom. With the addition of time pressure, these challenging decision making situations lead product developers to become susceptible to relying on heuristics, and prone to systematic errors and biases.

In our study, we aim to outline and understand which cognitive shortcomings are involved and create potential problems in development of more sustainable products. We do so by asking the question ‘Which cognitive barriers are most relevant when incorporating sustainability considerations into product development?’ Out of four identified categories of product development decisions - concept development, supply chain design, product design, and production ramp-up and launch – we focus on the first three as they are categories of decisions where product developers may try to incorporate sustainability. To address this question, we used the rich psychology literature on cognitive shortcomings to identify which barriers are particularly relevant in the decision-making context described by the literature on product development and decision-making for sustainability.

We contribute to the practice of people developing decision support for sustainable product development by increasing awareness of cognitive barriers that are particularly relevant in this context. Theoretically, we contribute with increased understanding regarding how different cognitive barriers may be influential under certain phases, and not under others – a matter which underpins a forthcoming discussion on how clusters of cognitive shortcomings may affect outcomes of including sustainability in the product development process.

National Category
Applied Psychology Environmental Engineering Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-10537 (URN)
Conference
The 23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference, Copenhagen
Projects
Model Driven Development and Decision Support
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

 Track 6: Management of innovation, product development and design 

Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2017-04-24Bibliographically approved
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