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Hallberg, Ingalill R
Alternative names
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Holst, G., Rennemark, M. & Hallberg, I. (2012). Self and next of kin’s assessment of personality and sense of coherence in elderly people: Implications for dementia care. Dementia, 11(1), 19-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self and next of kin’s assessment of personality and sense of coherence in elderly people: Implications for dementia care
2012 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nurses sometimes fail to understand the behaviour of individuals with severe dementia. Information from a next of kin may help to bridge this communicative gap. One factor that influences a person’s reaction to a disease is their personality and ability to cope with stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater agreement between healthy elderly people’s self-assessment and the assessment made by a next of kin concerning personality and sense of coherence. The participants (n¼154) answered questions from the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) and the Antonovsky Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale. The study shows high or moderate agreement in ratings when analysed by means of an intra-class correlation coefficient (range between r¼.57 and r¼.72) and the results indicate that in general a close relative is able to report on the personality of a next of kin. The inter-rater agreement was high on SOC and extraversion and somewhat lower on neuroticism. For neuroticism, length of time in the relationship increased the odds for a good inter-rater agreement. Thus, seemingly a next of kin is a reliable informant for the elderly in general and is probably also able to add information useful in the nursing care of people with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage, 2012
Keywords
Dementia, Family caregiving
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-7452 (URN)10.1177/1471301211421238 (DOI)oai:bth.se:forskinfo8B76F18C3C299560C12579120021B088 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo8B76F18C3C299560C12579120021B088 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo8B76F18C3C299560C12579120021B088 (OAI)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2011-09-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Fagerström, C., Persson, H., Holst, G. & Hallberg, I. R. (2008). Determinants of Feeling Hindered by Health Problems in Daily Living at 60 Years and Above. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 22(3), 410-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of Feeling Hindered by Health Problems in Daily Living at 60 Years and Above
2008 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 410-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) is frequently used to identify the impact on daily living caused by health problems such as diseases, impaired eyesight or hearing, it is still not well known what makes people feel hindered in daily living with more or less inability to perform ADL. The aim of this study was to investigate feeling hindered by health problems in daily living among people (n = 958, 60-96 years) in relation to ADL capacity, health problems as well as social and financial resources, sense of coherence and life satisfaction. The data are taken from a baseline survey in one of the four included centres (Blekinge) of the longitudinal multicentre cohort study, The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. The result showed that people felt hindered by their health problems despite no impairment in ADL capacity. Feeling greatly hindered by health problems was associated with factors linked to mobility but also to fatigue, no help when needed, and avoiding being outdoors due to fear of falling. Factors associated with feeling greatly hindered differed depending on whether people were impaired in ADL capacity or not. In people with excellent ADL capacity feeling hindered was associated with picking up things from the floor and rising from a chair and fatigue, whereas avoiding being outdoors, no help when needed and rising from a chair were found to be associated with feeling hindered by health problems among people with impaired ADL capacity. Combining people's ADL capacity with questions about feeling hindered may provide knowledge of determinant factors of feeling hindered in relation to ADL capacity, impaired or not, to identify people in need of rehabilitation or other interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2008
Keywords
activity of daily living capacity, fatigue, feeling hindered, mobility, older people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-8333 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00545.x (DOI)000258582100012 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfoD744C08214FE274AC125750D0033FE95 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoD744C08214FE274AC125750D0033FE95 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoD744C08214FE274AC125750D0033FE95 (OAI)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2008-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Fagerström, C., Holst, G. & Hallberg, I. R. (2007). Feeling hindered by health problems and functional capacity at 60 years and above. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 44(2), 181-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeling hindered by health problems and functional capacity at 60 years and above
2007 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 181-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is common to use activities of daily living (ADL) rating scales to identify the impact of health problems such as diseases, impaired eyesight or hearing on daily life. However, for various reasons people with health problems might feel hindered in daily life before limitations in ability to perform ADL have occurred. In addition, there is sparse knowledge of what makes people feel hindered by health problems in relation to their ADL capacity. The aim was to investigate feeling hindered by health problems among 1297 people aged 60–89 living at home in relation to ADL capacity, health problems, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social and financial resources, using a self-reported questionnaire, including questions from OARS (Older Americans’ Resources and Services schedule), Rosenberg’s self-esteem and Life Satisfaction Index Z. People feeling greatly hindered by health problems rarely had anyone who could help when they needed support, had lower life satisfaction and self-esteem than those not feeling hindered. Feeling hindered by health problems appeared to take on a different meaning depending on ADL capacity, knowledge that seems essential to include when accomplishing health promotion and rehabilitation interventions, especially at the early stages of reduced ADL capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2007
Keywords
ADL capacity, Availability of help, Health problems, Life satisfaction, Older adults, Self-esteem
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-9328 (URN)000243671400010 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo45F030267C3807E2C12572420039FADA (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo45F030267C3807E2C12572420039FADA (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo45F030267C3807E2C12572420039FADA (OAI)
External cooperation:
Note

Full text of the article is available on-line in the database PubMed

Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2006-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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