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Skär, L., Christel, B., Emtner, M. & Ekström, M. (2023). Thoughts on the end of life in patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A qualitative interview study. Nursing Open, 10(4), 2158-2164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thoughts on the end of life in patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A qualitative interview study
2023 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2158-2164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the study was to deepen the current knowledge of how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and long-term oxygen treatment think about and expect end-of-life. Design: A qualitative design was used. Methods: A purposeful sample of 19 patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was obtained from the Swedish National Registry on Respiratory Failure (Swedevox). Data was collected with semi-structured interviews and analysed using a hermeneutic approach. Results: The analysis revealed three themes: Living in the present without a future; difficulty talking about the uncertainty; and feeling anxious about leaving family behind. Participants indicated that healthcare professionals should invite them to mutual discussions as it was easier to reject an invitation if they could not talk right then, than to initiate a discussion themselves. Start of home oxygen or a deteriorating health status may be an important time to clinically address existential and end-of-life issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
Palliative care, COPD, experiences, encounters, symtoms, therapy, death
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-23975 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1463 (DOI)000879079900001 ()36334046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141516298 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-11-24 Created: 2022-11-24 Last updated: 2023-06-19Bibliographically approved
Lindqvist, G., Ge, L., Borg, C., Xiaoling, Z., Hongbo, X., Safipour, J. & Rask, M. (2022). Nursing students’ perceptions of their verbal and social interaction skills in Sweden and China during their first semester. Quality Advancement in Nursing Education, 8(1), Article ID 9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students’ perceptions of their verbal and social interaction skills in Sweden and China during their first semester
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2022 (English)In: Quality Advancement in Nursing Education, ISSN 2368-6669, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed to investigate the similarities and differences related to verbal and social interaction skills between nursing students attending universities in Sweden and China, two countries with different educational systems, during the students’ first semester. Background: Nurses need a high level of interaction skills in order to interact effectively with patients and their families. Thus, practical nursing education focusing on clinical skills is essential. Method: Students at one university in Sweden and two universities in China completed the Verbal and Social Interactions for Nursing Students (VSI-NS) questionnaire. Results: The students perceived ‘Building a caring relationship’ and ‘Caring towards health and well-being’ as the most frequently occurring and important types of caring interactions. The students perceived that talking with a patient about his/her feelings and thoughts was the least frequently occurring and least important type of caring interaction. Conclusion: The students appear to understand from the initial phase of their education that the caring relationship and the patients’ health and well-being will be the major focus of their role as nurses. © 2022, Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-25605 (URN)10.17483/2368-6669.1308 (DOI)2-s2.0-85159891794 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-14 Created: 2023-11-14 Last updated: 2023-11-14Bibliographically approved
Christel, B., Tell, J., Lindberg, T., Nilsson, L., Olsson, A., Forsbrand, M. & Skär, L. (2022). Problem-based learning with digitals tools in the nursing programme during the Covid-19 pandemic. Högre Utbildning, 12(2), 117-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Problem-based learning with digitals tools in the nursing programme during the Covid-19 pandemic
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2022 (English)In: Högre Utbildning, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the spring 2019, the prerequisites for conducting education were changed due to the pandemic. For higher education in Sweden almost all education switches on to digital education. Nursing education has focus on both theoretical and practical courses, which is a challenge for digital or distance education. Furthermore, the nursing programme at the studied university used problem-based learning (PBL), with base-groups at campus. Instead of physical meetings at campus, the base-groups took part with digital tools. The impact of base-groupsmeeting with digital tools are important to reflect on, especially since the education and learning of future probably will be more hybrid. © 2022 Christel Borg, Johanna Tell, Terese Lindberg, Lina Nilsson, Anki Olsson, Malin Forsbrand & Lisa Skär.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2022
Keywords
Covid-19 pandemic, digital tools, nursing education, problembased learning
National Category
Pedagogy Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-24694 (URN)10.23865/hu.v12.3560 (DOI)2-s2.0-85159665814 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-02 Created: 2023-06-02 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, T., Sandström, B., Andersson, E. K., Christel, B., Hjelm, M., Nilsson, L., . . . Skär, L. (2021). Older persons' experience of eHealth services in home health care: A meta-ethnography eHealth services in home health care. Health Informatics Journal, 27(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older persons' experience of eHealth services in home health care: A meta-ethnography eHealth services in home health care
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2021 (English)In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to describe older persons' experiences of eHealth services in home health care. A meta-ethnographic approach was applied, and a systematic literature search was conducted in three databases. In total, 11 articles were included and analysed, which resulted in two themes and six sub-themes. The results show that for older persons to use the eHealth services, they must provide some additional value compared to current contacts with healthcare professionals. Those with regular healthcare contact do not experience the eHealth service as adding anything to the care they already receive. The introduction of eHealth services involves learning how to use the new technology, and some older persons experience the technology as motivating and inspiring. The eHealth service makes some feel safer while some do not trust the technology. In order to make the best use of eHealth services, it is important that the services are adjusted not only to each person's needs but also to their personal capabilities and resources, while the older person must feel valued as an active partner in the care process. Thus, when using eHealth services, the older person's perspective needs to be given priority and decisions should not only be based on organizational considerations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
eHealth, experiences, home health care, older persons, ADULTS
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-22784 (URN)10.1177/14604582211059370 (DOI)000760144200001 ()2-s2.0-85125782374 (Scopus ID)
Note

open access

Available from: 2022-10-14 Created: 2022-10-14 Last updated: 2023-06-02Bibliographically approved
Hofflander, M., Nilsson, L., Eriksén, S. & Borg, C. (2016). Framing the Implementation Process of Video Conferencing in Discharge Planning: According to Staff Experience. Informatics for Health and Social Care, 41(2), 192-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framing the Implementation Process of Video Conferencing in Discharge Planning: According to Staff Experience
2016 (English)In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 192-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Challenges of improving discharge planning have been an area of concern for many years, including problems related to lack of time for professionals to participate. In a county in South East Sweden, video conferencing was implemented in discharge planning sessions to enable distance participation of the professionals. To examine the implementation process, interviews were conducted with the implementers, who were project leaders, discharge planning coordinators in the hospital, and in home-care. The interviews were analysed qualitatively, using directed content analysis with a deductive approach to a theoretical framework that was composed from theories about implementation processes to be suitable for the healthcare sector, consisting of the factors: implementation objects; implementation actions; actors; users; inner context and outer context. The results of this study are consistent with the framework but with the addition of a new dimension – time, i.e. time to prepare; time to understand; time to run through and time to reflect. It is suggested that implementation frameworks are useful when IT is introduced in healthcare. Framing the implementation process supports the exposure of factors and highlights relationships and states of dependence between those factors which may affect implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2016
Keywords
Discharge planning, Implementation process, Qualitative study, Video conferencing
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6405 (URN)10.3109/17538157.2015.1008484 (DOI)000371873100007 ()
Available from: 2015-03-03 Created: 2015-03-03 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L., Eriksén, S. & Borg, C. (2014). Social Challenges When Implementing Information Systems in Everyday Work in a Nursing Context. Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 32(9), 442-450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Challenges When Implementing Information Systems in Everyday Work in a Nursing Context
2014 (English)In: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, ISSN 1538-2931, E-ISSN 1538-9774, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 442-450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Implementation of information systems in healthcare has become a lengthy process where healthcare staff (eg, nurses) are expected to put information into systems without getting the overall picture of the potential usefulness for their own work. The aim of this study was to explore social challenges when implementing information systems in everyday work in a nursing context. Moreover, this study aimed at putting perceived social challenges in a theoretical framework to address them more constructively when implementing information systems in healthcare. Influenced by institutional ethnography, the findings are based on interviews, observations, and written reflections. Power (changing the existing hierarchy, alienation), professional identity (calling on hold, expert becomes novice, changed routines), and encounter (ignorant introductions, preconceived notions) were categories (subcategories) presented in the findings. Social Cognitive Theory, Diffusion of Innovations, organizational culture, and dramaturgical analysis are proposed to set up a theoretical framework. If social challenges are not considered and addressed in the implementation process, it will be affected by nurses’ solidarity to existing power structures and their own professional identity. Thus, implementation of information systems affects more aspects in the organization than might have been intended. These aspects need to be taken in to account in the implementation process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
Keywords
Implementation, Information systems, Institutional ethnography, Nursing context, Social challenges
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6336 (URN)10.1097/CIN.0000000000000075 (DOI)000348186900005 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfoE13EBFF58A839C25C1257D5E0044F295 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoE13EBFF58A839C25C1257D5E0044F295 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoE13EBFF58A839C25C1257D5E0044F295 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Eriksén, S., Lundberg, J., Georgsson, M., Nilsson, L., Hofflander, M. & Borg, C. (2014). Transforming Healthcare Delivery: ICT Design for Self-Care of Type 2 Diabetes. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI). Helsinki: ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transforming Healthcare Delivery: ICT Design for Self-Care of Type 2 Diabetes
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this position paper we present an on-going case study where the aim is to design and implement mobile technologies for self-care for patients with type 2 diabetes. The main issue we are addressing in this paper is how to bridge clinical and non-clinical settings when designing self-care technologies. Usability, User Experience and Participatory Design are central aspects of our research approach. For designing with and for patients in home settings and everyday life situations, this approach has so far not been problematic. However, when it comes to designing with and for user groups located within a large healthcare organization, in a highly institutionalized clinical setting, the situation is different. We have recently introduced the Health Usability Maturity Model (UMM) to our project partners as a potential tool for bringing usability and participa-tory design issues to the fore as strategic assets for transforming healthcare delivery with ICT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: ACM, 2014
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6577 (URN)oai:bth.se:forskinfoEA3E2153964225F5C1257D5E00456FFD (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfoEA3E2153964225F5C1257D5E00456FFD (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfoEA3E2153964225F5C1257D5E00456FFD (OAI)
Conference
Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI)
Available from: 2014-11-11 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Hofflander, M., Nilsson, L., Borg, C. & Eriksén, S. (2014). Video Conference as a Tool to Enable Participation in Discharge Planning – Experiences From Implementers about the Implementation Process. In: : . Paper presented at HICSS47, Waikoloa, Hawaii. IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Video Conference as a Tool to Enable Participation in Discharge Planning – Experiences From Implementers about the Implementation Process
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The problems and challenges that arise in the task of improving discharge planning have been an area of concern for many years, including problems related to the lack of time for professionals to participate. In a county council area in South East Sweden, video conferencing was implemented in discharge planning sessions to enable distance participation. As part of a larger research study of the implementation process, interviews were conducted with two of the implementers. The interviews were analysed qualitatively, using directed content analysis with a deductive approach to considering a framework developed by Nilsen et al. The results of this study are consistent with the actual framework but with the addition of time, i.e. time to prepare, time to understand, time to run through and time to reflect. Further research is proposed to focus more on leadership during the implementation process and its influence on the meaning of time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2014
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6445 (URN)10.1109/HICSS.2014.332 (DOI)000343806602095 ()9781479925049 (ISBN)
Conference
HICSS47, Waikoloa, Hawaii
Available from: 2015-01-02 Created: 2014-09-25 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Hofflander, M., Lina, N., Sara, E. & Christel, B. (2013). Discharge planning: Narrated by nursing staff in primary healthcare and their concerns about using video conferencing in the planning session – An interview study. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 3(1), 88-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discharge planning: Narrated by nursing staff in primary healthcare and their concerns about using video conferencing in the planning session – An interview study
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 88-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Objective: This paper sets out to describe experience-based reflections on discharge planning as narrated by nursing staff in primary healthcare, along with their concerns about how the introduction of video conferencing might influence the discharge planning situation. Methods: Interviews were conducted with nursing staff working at a primary healthcare centre in South East Sweden. Each interview took place was conducted on a one-to-one basis in dialogue form, using open questions and supported by an interview guide. It was then analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Participants were eligible for the study if they had given their informed consent and if they worked with discharge planning and home-based healthcare provision. In total, 10 of the 30 persons working at the primary healthcare centre participated in the study. Results: It was found that nursing staff in primary healthcare regarded the planning session as stressful, time-consuming and characterised by a lack of respect between nursing staff at the hospital and nursing staff in primary healthcare. They also described uncertainty and hesitation about using video conferences where patients might probably be the losers and nursing staff the winners. Conclusions: It is suggested that there is a need for improvement in communication and understanding between nursing staff at the hospital and nursing staff in primary healthcare in order to develop discharge planning. There is also a need for the nursing staff in primary healthcare to obtain more information about how Information Technology (IT) solutions could support their work and help them to find ways to collaborate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press, 2013
Keywords
Discharge planning, Healthcare, Information technology (IT), Nursing staff, Phenomenological hermeneutical, Video
National Category
Computer Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-7073 (URN)oai:bth.se:forskinfo39A917A3F639D3F6C1257AD30049414C (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo39A917A3F639D3F6C1257AD30049414C (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo39A917A3F639D3F6C1257AD30049414C (OAI)
Note

Open Access Journal

Available from: 2012-12-17 Created: 2012-12-13 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L., Hofflander, M., Eriksén, S. & Borg, C. (2012). The importance of interaction in the implementation of information technology in health care: A symbolic interactionism study on the meaning of accessibility. Informatics for Health and Social Care, 37(4), 277-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of interaction in the implementation of information technology in health care: A symbolic interactionism study on the meaning of accessibility
2012 (English)In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A challenge when groups from different disciplines work together in implementing health information technology (HIT) in a health-care context is that words often have different meanings depending upon work practices, and definition of situations. Accessibility is a word commonly associated with HIT implementation. This study aimed to investigate different meanings of accessibility when implementing HIT in everyday work practice in a health-care context. It focused on the perspective of nurses to highlight another view of the complex relationship between HIT and information in a health-care context. This is a qualitative study influenced by institutional ethnographic. District nurses and student nurses were interviewed. The results indicate that when implementing HIT accessibility depends on working routines, social structures and patient relationship. The findings of the study suggest that interaction needs to take on a more important role when implementing HIT because people act upon words from the interpreted meaning of them. Symbolic interactionism is proposed as a way to set a mutual stage to facilitate an overall understanding of the importance of the meaning of words. There is a need for making place and space for negotiation of the meaning of words when implementing HIT in everyday work practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London : Informa Healthcare, 2012
Keywords
co-constructed meaning of words, everyday work practice, health information technology, institutional ethnography, symbolic interactionism
National Category
Computer Sciences Nursing Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-7012 (URN)10.3109/17538157.2012.710683 (DOI)000311838500007 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo94BD858638C427F0C1257AD30048DA2B (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo94BD858638C427F0C1257AD30048DA2B (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo94BD858638C427F0C1257AD30048DA2B (OAI)
Available from: 2013-03-07 Created: 2012-12-13 Last updated: 2021-01-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0325-3137

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