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Kristensson, Jimmie
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Berthelsen, C. B. & Kristensson, J. (2017). A sense of security: Spouses' experiences of participating in an orthopaedic case management intervention (the SICAM-trial). International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 24, 21-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A sense of security: Spouses' experiences of participating in an orthopaedic case management intervention (the SICAM-trial)
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 24, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to explore and describe spouses' experiences of participating in a case management intervention during older patients' fast-track programme having total hip replacement as well as which intervention elements they found useful. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 10 spouses from the intervention group of the SICAM-trial, directed by predetermined codes based on elements of the intervention. Data were analysed by both authors using directed content analysis. The results showed that the spouses were very pleased about being a part of the case management intervention. They enjoyed being active participants even though problems sometimes occurred such as coordination difficulties between the case manager and other healthcare professionals and their feeling of being burdened. The spouses experienced the contact with the case manager as the most meaningful part of their participation and the telephone contact with her as the most useful element of the intervention. The fact that not all spouses participated in all the available intervention elements could be explained by their feeling of being burdened and that they were not fully aware of what the intervention elements were.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Case management, Case manager, Directed content analysis, Fast-track programme, Older adults, Security, Spouses, Total hip replacement
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13759 (URN)10.1016/j.ijotn.2016.06.002 (DOI)000390590700004 ()2-s2.0-85007212227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Granbom, M., Kristensson, J. & Sandberg, M. (2017). Effects on leisure activities and social participation of a case management intervention for frail older people living at home: A randomised controlled trial. Health & Social Care in the Community, 25(4), 1416-1429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects on leisure activities and social participation of a case management intervention for frail older people living at home: A randomised controlled trial
2017 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1416-1429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Frailty causes disability and restrictions on older people's ability to engage in leisure activities and for social participation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 1-year case management intervention for frail older people living at home in Sweden in terms of social participation and leisure activities. The study was a randomised controlled trial with repeated follow-ups. The sample (n = 153) was consecutively and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 80) or control groups (n = 73). The intervention group received monthly home visits over the course of a year by nurses and physiotherapists working as case managers, using a multifactorial preventive approach. Data collections on social participation, leisure activities and rating of important leisure activities were performed at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, with recruitment between October 2006 and April 2011. The results did not show any differences in favour of the intervention on social participation. However, the intervention group performed leisure activities in general, and important physical leisure activities, to a greater extent than the control group at the 3-month follow-up (median 13 vs. 11, P = 0.034 and median 3 vs. 3, P = 0.031 respectively). A statistically significantly greater proportion of participants from the intervention group had an increased or unchanged number of important social leisure activities that they performed for the periods from baseline to 3 months (93.2% vs. 75.4%, OR = 4.48, 95% CI: 1.37-14.58). Even though statistically significant findings in favour of the intervention were found, more research on activity-focused case management interventions is needed to achieve clear effects on social participation and leisure activities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2017
Keywords
Aged, Case management, Community living, Frailty, Health promotion
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14068 (URN)10.1111/hsc.12442 (DOI)000402679900013 ()2-s2.0-85015202664 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-30 Created: 2017-03-30 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved
Berthelsen, C. B. & Kristensson, J. (2017). The SICAM-trial: evaluating the effect of spouses' involvement through case management in older patients' fast-track programmes during and after total hip replacement. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(1), 112-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The SICAM-trial: evaluating the effect of spouses' involvement through case management in older patients' fast-track programmes during and after total hip replacement
2017 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 112-126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of spouses' involvement in older patients' care trajectories, using case management as intervention in total hip replacement through fast-track programmes. BackgroundPatients need their spouses to be involved in their fast-track programmes and this involvement is often associated with improvements in patient outcomes. However, the effect of spouses' involvement in older patients' fast-track programmes has not yet been investigated. DesignA two-group quasi-experimental design with pre-test and repeated post-test measures was conducted in an orthopaedic ward of a Danish Regional Hospital from February 2014-June 2015. Spouse-patient dyads were initially recruited for the control group (n=14), receiving usual care; dyads for the intervention group (n=15) were recruited afterwards, receiving case management intervention elements before, during and after admission. MethodsFace-to-face interviews on questionnaires were conducted with spouses and patients at baseline, 2weeks and 3months after discharge, measuring spouses' caregiver satisfaction, difficulties and level of anxiety and patients' functional and nutritional status, pain and level of depression. ResultsThe results showed that there were no differences between the groups with regard to any of the outcome measures. However, statistically significant improvements were found in the patient groups on functional status, pain and depression and in the groups of spouses on caregiver satisfaction. ConclusionThe case management intervention seemed to have an effect in patient and spousal groups; however, this improvement could also have been caused by the effect of fast-track treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
case management, complex intervention, fast-track programme, nursing, older patients, quasi-experimental, spouses, total hip replacement
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13714 (URN)10.1111/jan.13091 (DOI)000389832100010 ()
Available from: 2017-01-05 Created: 2017-01-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Axmon, A., Kristensson, J., Ahlström, G. & Midlöv, P. (2017). Use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepine derivatives, and dementia medication among older people with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder and dementia. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 62, 50-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepine derivatives, and dementia medication among older people with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder and dementia
2017 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, Vol. 62, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Although people with intellectual disability (ID) and people with dementia have high drug prescription rates, there is a lack of studies investigating drug use among those with concurrent diagnoses of ID and dementia. Aim To investigate the use of antipsychotics, benzodiazepine derivatives, and drugs recommended for dementia treatment (anticholinesterases [AChEIs] and memantine) among people with ID and dementia. Methods and procedures Having received support available for people with ID and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was used as a proxy for ID. The ID cohort consisted of 7936 individuals, aged at least 55 years in 2012, and the referent cohort of age- and sex-matched people from the general population (gPop). People with a specialists’ diagnosis of dementia during 2002–2012 were identified (ID, n = 180; gPop, n = 67), and data on prescription of the investigated drugs during the period 2006–2012 were collected. Outcome and results People with ID/ASD and dementia were more likely than people with ID/ASD but without dementia to be prescribed antipsychotics (50% vs 39% over the study period; odds ratio (OR) 1.85, 95% confidence interval 1.13–30.3) and benzodiazepine derivatives (55% vs 36%; OR 2.42, 1.48–3.98). They were also more likely than people with dementia from the general population to be prescribed antipsychotics (50% vs 25%; OR 3.18, 1.59–6.34), but less likely to be prescribed AChEIs (28% vs 45%; OR 0.32, 0.16–0.64).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Anticholinesterases, Drug prescription, Drug use, Memantine, Registry study, Sweden
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13867 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2017.01.001 (DOI)000395851000005 ()2-s2.0-85010019208 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4753
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-03 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Sandberg, M., Ahlström, G., Axmon, A. & Kristensson, J. (2016). Somatic healthcare utilisation patterns among older people with intellectual disability: an 11-year register study. BMC Health Services Research, 16(1), 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somatic healthcare utilisation patterns among older people with intellectual disability: an 11-year register study
2016 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are known to have more diseases and are believed to start aging earlier than the general population. The population of older people with ID is growing, but knowledge about their use of healthcare is limited. This study aimed to explore somatic healthcare utilisation patterns among people with ID living in Sweden, in comparison with the general population from 2002 to 2012. Methods: Participants were a group of people with ID (n = 7936) aged 55 years and older in 2012, and an equal-sized, birth year and sex matched, general population sample (n = 7936). Participants were divided into age groups of 5-year intervals. Data regarding in- and outpatient care were collected from the Swedish National Patient Register. Results: In the younger age groups, the ID group had higher healthcare utilisation compared with the general population sample, with higher risks for planned and unplanned somatic in- and outpatient care, particularly for unplanned inpatient registrations. Decreasing patterns were seen with age; with lower risks in the ID group for the oldest age groups. This was most evident in planned somatic in- and outpatient care. In those with at least one registration, the ID group had a longer unplanned length of stay in the younger age groups, but fewer planned visits to physicians in somatic outpatient care compared with the control group. Conclusions: Compared with the general population, people with ID show higher healthcare utilisation in younger age groups. Healthcare utilisation decreases with age, and in old age, fewer people with ID use healthcare compared with the general population. The barriers to accessing planned healthcare for older people with ID need more investigation. © 2016 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Aged, Aging, Healthcare utilisation, Inpatient, Intellectual disability, Outpatient, Register studies, Retrospective studies
National Category
Nursing Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13486 (URN)10.1186/s12913-016-1880-x (DOI)000387278300003 ()2-s2.0-84994500775 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-24 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Holst, G., Kristensson, J., Willman, A. & Bohman, D. (2013). Case managers’ experiences of their everyday practice. In: European Geriatric Medicine: . Paper presented at 9th Congress of the EUGMS. Venice: Elsevier Masson SAS, 4(Supplement 1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case managers’ experiences of their everyday practice
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2013 (English)In: European Geriatric Medicine, Venice: Elsevier Masson SAS , 2013, Vol. 4, no Supplement 1Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction.– Today, there is an interest in how Case Management (CM) should be designed to best suit the complex needs of the older people with multi-morbidity. Current research on CM has mainly focused on health care costs and consumption, but the results have been inconsistent and ranging from positive outcomes to no effect. To improve CM, there is need to investigate what mechanisms are important for a successful intervention. To advance this knowledge, there is a necessity for studies investigating the experiences of those practicing CM i.e. Case Managers. There might be unknown factors or interpersonal factors that can contribute to a CM intervention's success or failure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the Case Managers’ experiences of their everyday practice. Methods.– The study design was qualitative and descriptive utilizing an ethnographic approach, consisting of participant observations, a focus group interview and individual interviews with nine Case Managers conducted during 2012/2013. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and then subjected to content analysis. Results.– Three main themes described Case Managers’ experience of their everyday practice: navigating the older person, working to improve the health care system and being the older persons advocate. Conclusions.– Findings from this study sheds light on the complexity of CM for older people with multi-morbidity, from the experiences of Case Managers. These findings could help in the development of CM models designed for older people with complex health needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Venice: Elsevier Masson SAS, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6836 (URN)10.1016/j.eurger.2013.07.156 (DOI)000325236300001 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo4AC472E444FC12CCC1257C32004A03B5 (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4AC472E444FC12CCC1257C32004A03B5 (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4AC472E444FC12CCC1257C32004A03B5 (OAI)
Conference
9th Congress of the EUGMS
Note

(European Union Geriatric Medicine Society)

Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-11-29 Last updated: 2017-05-26Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Kristensson, J., Holst, G., Willman, A. & Bohman, D. (2013). Case managers for older persons with multi-morbidity and their everyday work -- a focused ethnography. BMC Health Services Research, 13(496)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case managers for older persons with multi-morbidity and their everyday work -- a focused ethnography
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2013 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Modern-day health systems are complex, making it difficult to assure continuity of care for older persons with multi-morbidity. One way of intervening in a health system that is leading to fragmented care is by utilising Case Management (CM). CM aims to improve co-ordination of healthcare and social services. To better understand and advance the development of CM, there is a need for additional research that provides rich descriptions of CM in practice. This knowledge is important as there could be unknown mechanisms, contextual or interpersonal, that contribute to the success or failure of a CM intervention. Furthermore, the CM intervention in this study is conducted in the context of the Swedish health system, which prior to this intervention was unfamiliar with this kind of coordinative service. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday work undertaken by case managers within a CM intervention, with a focus on their experiences. Methods The study design was qualitative and inductive, utilising a focused ethnographic approach. Data collection consisted of participant observations with field notes as well as a group interview and individual interviews with nine case managers, conducted in 2012/2013. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Results An overarching theme emerged from the data: Challenging current professional identity, with three sub-themes. The sub-themes were 1) Adjusting to familiar work in an unfamiliar role; 2) Striving to improve the health system through a new role; 3) Trust is vital to advocacy. Conclusions Findings from this study shed some light on the complexity of CM for older persons with multi-morbidity, as seen from the perspective of case managers. The findings illustrate how their everyday work as case managers represents a challenge to their current professional identity. These findings could help to understand and promote the development of CM models aimed at a population of older persons with complex health needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Biomed Central, 2013
Keywords
Case manager, Case management, Continuity of care, Ethnography, Focused ethnography, Intervention, Multi-morbidity, Older persons, Thematic analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-6677 (URN)10.1186/1472-6963-13-496 (DOI)000330068400001 ()oai:bth.se:forskinfo4EF83943962328F6C1257C32004D756A (Local ID)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4EF83943962328F6C1257C32004D756A (Archive number)oai:bth.se:forskinfo4EF83943962328F6C1257C32004D756A (OAI)
Note

Open access journal

Available from: 2014-07-17 Created: 2013-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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