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Fotrousi, Farnaz
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Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Wüest, D., Fotrousi, F. & Fricker, S. (2019). Combining Monitoring and AutonomousFeedback Requests to Elicit Actionable Knowledge of System Use. In: E. Knauss and M. Goedicke (Ed.), Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality: . Paper presented at 25 Intl. Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality (REFSQ 2019) (pp. 209-225). , 11412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combining Monitoring and AutonomousFeedback Requests to Elicit Actionable Knowledge of System Use
2019 (English)In: Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality / [ed] E. Knauss and M. Goedicke, 2019, Vol. 11412, p. 209-225Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

[Context and motivation] To validate developers’ ideas of what users might want and to understand user needs, it has been proposed to collect and combine system monitoring with user feedback. [Question/problem] So far, the monitoring data and feedback have been collected passively, hoping for the users to get active when problems emerge. This approach leaves unexplored opportunities for system improvement when users are also passive or do not know that they are invited to offer feedback. [Principal ideas/results] In this paper, we show how we have used goal monitors to identify interesting situations of system use and let a system autonomously elicit user feedback in these situations. We have used a monitor to detect interesting situations in the use of a system and issued automated requests for user feedback to interpret the monitoring observations from the users’ perspectives. [Contribution] The paper describes the implementation of our approach in a Smart City system and reports our results and experiences. It shows that combining system monitoring with proactive, autonomous feedback collection was useful and surfaced knowledge of system use that was relevant for system maintenance and evolution. The results were helpful for the city to adapt and improve the Smart City application and to maintain their internet-of-things deployment of sensors.

Series
Programming and Software Engineering - Lecture Notes in Computer Science ; 11412
Keywords
Requirements monitoring, User feedback, Requirements elicitation, Smart city
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17738 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-15538-4_16 (DOI)978-3-030-15538-4 (ISBN)
Conference
25 Intl. Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality (REFSQ 2019)
Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
Molléri, J. S., Nurdiani, I., Fotrousi, F. & Petersen, K. (2019). Experiences of studying attention through EEG in the context of review tasks. In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: . Paper presented at 23rd Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering Conference, EASE Copenhagen, 14 April 2019 through 17 April (pp. 313-318). Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of studying attention through EEG in the context of review tasks
2019 (English)In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2019, p. 313-318Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Context: Electroencephalograms (EEG) have been used in a few cases in the context of software engineering (SE). EEGs allow capturing emotions and cognitive functioning. Such human factors have already shown to be important to understand software engineering tasks. Therefore, it is essential to gain experience in the community to utilize EEG as a research tool. Objective: To report experiences of using EEG in the context of a software engineering education (review of master theses proposals). We provide our reflections and lessons learned of (1) how to plan an EEG study, (2) how to conduct and execute (e.g., tools), (3) how to analyze. Method: We carried out an experiment using an EEG headset to measure the participants’ attention rate. The experiment task includes reviewing three master thesis project plans. Results: We describe how we evolved our understanding of experimentation practices to collect and analyze psychological and cognitive data. We also provide a set of lessons learned regarding the application of EEG technology for research. Conclusions: We believe that that EEG could benefit software engineering research to collect cognitive information under certain conditions. The lessons learned reported here should be used as inputs for future experiments in software engineering, where human aspects are of interest. © 2019 Association for Computing Machinery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2019
Keywords
Attention, Electroencephalogram, Experiment, Human subjects, Bioelectric phenomena, Electroencephalography, Engineering research, Experiments, Cognitive information, Electro-encephalogram (EEG), Human aspects, Project plans, Research tools, Software engineering
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17890 (URN)10.1145/3319008.3319357 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064765914 (Scopus ID)9781450371452 (ISBN)
Conference
23rd Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering Conference, EASE Copenhagen, 14 April 2019 through 17 April
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Oriol, M., Stade, M., Fotrousi, F., Nadal, S., Varga, J., Seyff, N., . . . Schmidt, O. (2018). FAME: Supporting continuous requirements elicitation by combining user feedback and monitoring. In: Proceedings - 2018 IEEE 26th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2018: . Paper presented at 26th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2018, Banff, Canada, 20 August 2018 through 24 August 2018 (pp. 217-227). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FAME: Supporting continuous requirements elicitation by combining user feedback and monitoring
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings - 2018 IEEE 26th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2018, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2018, p. 217-227Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Context: Software evolution ensures that software systems in use stay up to date and provide value for end-users. However, it is challenging for requirements engineers to continuously elicit needs for systems used by heterogeneous end-users who are out of organisational reach. Objective: We aim at supporting continuous requirements elicitation by combining user feedback and usage monitoring. Online feedback mechanisms enable end-users to remotely communicate problems, experiences, and opinions, while monitoring provides valuable information about runtime events. It is argued that bringing both information sources together can help requirements engineers to understand end-user needs better. Method/Tool: We present FAME, a framework for the combined and simultaneous collection of feedback and monitoring data in web and mobile contexts to support continuous requirements elicitation. In addition to a detailed discussion of our technical solution, we present the first evidence that FAME can be successfully introduced in real-world contexts. Therefore, we deployed FAME in a web application of a German small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) to collect user feedback and usage data. Results/Conclusion: Our results suggest that FAME not only can be successfully used in industrial environments but that bringing feedback and monitoring data together helps the SME to improve their understanding of end-user needs, ultimately supporting continuous requirements elicitation. © 2018 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018
Keywords
Data collection, Feedback acquisition, Feedback gathering, Requirements, Requirements elicitation, Software evolution, Usage monitoring, User feedback, User involvement, Human computer interaction, Requirements engineering, Monitoring
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-17412 (URN)10.1109/RE.2018.00030 (DOI)2-s2.0-85056819919 (Scopus ID)9781538674185 (ISBN)
Conference
26th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2018, Banff, Canada, 20 August 2018 through 24 August 2018
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Fotrousi, F., Fricker, S. & Fiedler, M. (2018). The effect of requests for user feedback on Quality of Experience. Software quality journal, 26(2), 385-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of requests for user feedback on Quality of Experience
2018 (English)In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 385-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Companies are interested in knowing how users experience and perceive their products. Quality of Experience (QoE) is a measurement that is used to assess the degree of delight or annoyance in experiencing a software product. To assess QoE, we have used a feedback tool integrated into a software product to ask users about their QoE ratings and to obtain information about their rationales for good or bad QoEs. It is known that requests for feedback may disturb users; however, little is known about the subjective reasoning behind this disturbance or about whether this disturbance negatively affects the QoE of the software product for which the feedback is sought. In this paper, we present a mixed qualitative-quantitative study with 35 subjects that explore the relationship between feedback requests and QoE. The subjects experienced a requirement-modeling mobile product, which was integrated with a feedback tool. During and at the end of the experience, we collected the users' perceptions of the product and the feedback requests. Based on the users' rational for being disturbed by the feedback requests, such as "early feedback," "interruptive requests," "frequent requests," and "apparently inappropriate content," we modeled feedback requests. The model defines feedback requests using a set of five-tuple variables: "task," "timing" of the task for issuing the feedback requests, user's "expertise-phase" with the product, the "frequency" of feedback requests about the task, and the "content" of the feedback request. Configuration of these parameters might drive the participants' perceived disturbances. We also found that the disturbances generated by triggering user feedback requests have negligible impacts on the QoE of software products. These results imply that software product vendors may trust users' feedback even when the feedback requests disturb the users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Quality of experience, QoE, User feedback, User perception, Human factors
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-16526 (URN)10.1007/s11219-017-9373-7 (DOI)000433521200007 ()
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Seyff, N., Stade, M., Fotrousi, F., Glinz, M., Guzman, E., Kolpondinos-Huber, M., . . . Schaniel, R. (2017). End-user driven feedback prioritization. In: Ameller D.,Dieste O.,Knauss E.,Susi A.,Dalpiaz F.,Kifetew F.M.,Tenbergen B.,Palomares C.,Seffah A.,Forbrig P.,Berry D.M.,Daneva M.,Knauss A.,Siena A.,Daun M.,Herrmann A.,Kirikova M.,Groen E.C.,Horkoff J.,Maeder P.,Massacci F.,Ralyte J. (Ed.), CEUR Workshop Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2017 Joint REFSQ Workshops, Doctoral Symposium, Research Method Track, and Poster Track, co-located with the 23rd International Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ, Essen. CEUR-WS, 1796
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End-user driven feedback prioritization
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2017 (English)In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings / [ed] Ameller D.,Dieste O.,Knauss E.,Susi A.,Dalpiaz F.,Kifetew F.M.,Tenbergen B.,Palomares C.,Seffah A.,Forbrig P.,Berry D.M.,Daneva M.,Knauss A.,Siena A.,Daun M.,Herrmann A.,Kirikova M.,Groen E.C.,Horkoff J.,Maeder P.,Massacci F.,Ralyte J., CEUR-WS , 2017, Vol. 1796Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

End-user feedback is becoming more important for the evolution of software systems. There exist various communication channels for end-users (app stores, social networks) which allow them to express their experiences and requirements regarding a software application. End-users communicate a large amount of feedback via these channels which leads to open issues regarding the use of end-user feedback for software development, maintenance and evolution. This includes investigating how to identify relevant feedback scattered across different feedback channels and how to determine the priority of the feedback issues communicated. In this research preview paper, we discuss ideas for enduser driven feedback prioritization. © Copyright 2017 for this paper by its authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CEUR-WS, 2017
Keywords
End-user feedback, End-user involvement, Requirements prioritization, Application programs, Computer software selection and evaluation, Requirements engineering, Social sciences computing, End user involvement, Feedback channel, Prioritization, Relevant feedback, Software applications, Software systems, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-14095 (URN)2-s2.0-85016193161 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2017 Joint REFSQ Workshops, Doctoral Symposium, Research Method Track, and Poster Track, co-located with the 23rd International Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ, Essen
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Fotrousi, F., Seyff, N. & Börstler, J. (2017). Ethical considerations in research on user feedback. In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, REW 2017: . Paper presented at 25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, (REW), Lisbon (pp. 194-198). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical considerations in research on user feedback
2017 (English)In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, REW 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 194-198Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Collecting and using user feedback as a method to support requirements engineering, might undermine user rights. This becomes apparent when looking at related areas, e.g., research in user experience, where collecting user feedback also plays an important role. In such settings, researchers need to ensure that the stakeholders' rights and integrity are respected. This paper identifies and discusses some of the ethical challenges and issues a researcher can face, using an example case. Focusing on user feedback, this case can serve as an example for CrowdRE, i.e. several of our findings might apply to CrowdRE in general. However, further research is needed as our work mainly reflects the challenges experienced by the authors of this paper. © 2017 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017
Keywords
Crowd, Ethics, Requirement engineering, User feedback, Philosophical aspects, Requirements engineering, Ethical considerations, User experience, Engineering research
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15609 (URN)10.1109/REW.2017.68 (DOI)000427148000031 ()2-s2.0-85034624639 (Scopus ID)9781538634882 (ISBN)
Conference
25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, (REW), Lisbon
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Stade, M., Fotrousi, F., Seyff, N. & Albrecht, O. (2017). Feedback Gathering from an Industrial Point of View. In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2017: . Paper presented at 25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, (RE), Lisbon (pp. 71-79). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feedback Gathering from an Industrial Point of View
2017 (English)In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 71-79Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Feedback communication channels allow end-users to express their needs, which can be considered in software development and evolution. Although feedback gathering and analysis have been identified as an important topic and several researchers have started their investigation, information is scarce on how software companies currently elicit end-user feedback. In this study, we explore the experiences of software companies with respect to feedback gathering. The results of a case study and online survey indicate two sides of the same coin: On the one hand, most software companies are aware of the relevance of end-user feedback for software evolution and provide feedback channels, which allow end-users to communicate their needs and problems. On the other hand, the quantity and quality of the feedback received varies. We conclude that software companies still do not fully exploit the potential of end-user feedback for software development and evolution. © 2017 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017
Series
International Requirements Engineering Conference, ISSN 2332-6441
Keywords
case study, end-user feedback, experience report, requirements elicitation, software development, software evolution, software maintenance, survey, user involvement, Computer software maintenance, Requirements engineering, Software engineering, Surveying, Surveys, Software design
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15514 (URN)10.1109/RE.2017.9 (DOI)000427159100008 ()2-s2.0-85032828650 (Scopus ID)9781538631911 (ISBN)
Conference
25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, (RE), Lisbon
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Stade, M., Oriol, M., Cabrera, O., Fotrousi, F., Schaniel, R., Seyff, N. & Schmidt, O. (2017). Providing a user forum is not enough: First experiences of a software company with CrowdRE. In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, REW 2017: . Paper presented at 25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, (REW) , Lisbon (pp. 164-169). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Providing a user forum is not enough: First experiences of a software company with CrowdRE
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 25th International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, REW 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 164-169Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Crowd-based requirements engineering (CrowdRE) is promising to derive requirements by gathering and analyzing information from the crowd. Setting up CrowdRE in practice seems challenging, although first solutions to support CrowdRE exist. In this paper, we report on a German software company's experience on crowd involvement by using feedback communication channels and a monitoring solution for user-event data. In our case study, we identified several problem areas that a software company is confronted with to setup an environment for gathering requirements from the crowd. We conclude that a CrowdRE process cannot be implemented ad-hoc and that future work is needed to create and analyze a continuous feedback and monitoring data stream. © 2017 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017
Keywords
CrowdRE, End-user feedback, Monitoring solution, Requirements engineering, User events, User involvement, Software engineering, Data stream, Feedback communications, Problem areas, Software company
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-15608 (URN)10.1109/REW.2017.21 (DOI)000427148000026 ()2-s2.0-85034572079 (Scopus ID)9781538634882 (ISBN)
Conference
25th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference Workshops, (REW) , Lisbon
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Fotrousi, F. & Fricker, S. (2016). QoE probe: A requirement-monitoring tool. In: Forbrig P.,Borg M.,Herrmann A.,Unterkalmsteiner M.,Bjarnason E.,Daun M.,Franch X.,Kirikova M.,Palomares C.,Espana S.,Paech B.,Opdahl A.L.,Tenbergen B.,Dieste O.,Felderer M.,Gay G.,Horkoff J.,Seffah A.,Morandini M.,Petersen K. (Ed.), CEUR Workshop Proceedings: . Paper presented at REFSQ-2016 Workshops, co-located with the 22nd International Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ 2016; Gothenburg. CEUR-WS, 1564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>QoE probe: A requirement-monitoring tool
2016 (English)In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings / [ed] Forbrig P.,Borg M.,Herrmann A.,Unterkalmsteiner M.,Bjarnason E.,Daun M.,Franch X.,Kirikova M.,Palomares C.,Espana S.,Paech B.,Opdahl A.L.,Tenbergen B.,Dieste O.,Felderer M.,Gay G.,Horkoff J.,Seffah A.,Morandini M.,Petersen K., CEUR-WS , 2016, Vol. 1564Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Runtime requirement monitoring is used for verification and validation of implemented requirements. To monitor the requirements in runtime; we propose a "QoE probe" tool, a mobile application integrated through an API, to collect usage logs as well as users’ Quality of Experience (QoE) in the form of user feedback. The analysis of the collected data guides requirement monitoring of functional and non-functional requirements as well as capturing new requirements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CEUR-WS, 2016
Series
CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073 ; 1564
Keywords
Application programming interfaces (API); Computer software selection and evaluation; Probes; Requirements engineering, Mobile applications; Monitoring tools; Non-functional requirements; Quality of experience (QoE); Runtimes; User feedback; Verification-and-validation, Quality of service
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13182 (URN)2-s2.0-84964645558 (Scopus ID)
Conference
REFSQ-2016 Workshops, co-located with the 22nd International Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ 2016; Gothenburg
Note

 Conference of REFSQ-2016 Workshops, co-located with the 22nd International Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ 2016 ; Conference Date: 14 March 2016; Conference Code:119952

Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Fotrousi, F. (2016). Quality-Impact Assessment of Software Systems. In: Proceedings - 2016 IEEE 24th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2016: . Paper presented at 24th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2016, Beijing (pp. 427-431). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Article ID 7765560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality-Impact Assessment of Software Systems
2016 (English)In: Proceedings - 2016 IEEE 24th International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, p. 427-431, article id 7765560Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Runtime monitoring and assessment of software products, features, and requirements allow product managers and requirement engineers to verify the implemented features or requirements, and validate the user acceptance. Gaining insight into software quality and impact of the quality on user facilitates interpretation of quality against users' acceptance and vice versa. The insight also expedites root cause analysis and fast evolution in the case of threatening the health and sustainability of the software. Several studies have proposed automated monitoring solutions and assessment, however, none of the studies introduces a solution for a joint assessment of software quality and quality impact on users. In this research, we study the relation between software quality and the impact of quality on Quality of Experience (QoE) of users to support the assessment of software products, features, and requirements. We propose a Quality-Impact assessment method based on a joint analysis of software quality and user feedback. As an application of the proposed method in requirement engineering, the joint analysis guides verification and validation of functional and quality requirements as well as capturing new requirements. The study follows a design science approach to design Quality-Impact method artifact. The Quality-Impact method has been already designed and validated in the first design cycle. However, next design cycles will contribute to clarify problems of the initial design, refine and validate the proposed method. This paper presents the concluded results and explains future studies for the follow up of the Ph.D. research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016
Series
International Requirements Engineering Conference, ISSN 2332-6441
Keywords
analytics, Quality of Experience, quality requirements, requirement elicitation, requirement monitoring, software quality, user feedback, Computer software selection and evaluation, Product design, Quality of service, Requirements engineering, Quality of experience (QoE), Quality control
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-13762 (URN)10.1109/RE.2016.53 (DOI)000390249700059 ()2-s2.0-85007152850 (Scopus ID)9781509041213 (ISBN)
Conference
24th IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference, RE 2016, Beijing
Available from: 2017-01-16 Created: 2017-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
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