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Perception of Colors in Games as it Applies to Good and Evil
Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Context. Color can be used to convey allot of information but in particularly when it comes to tellingwho is good and who is evil. The most common color to use when displaying good and evil is blue forgood and red for evil.

Objectives. This study will take a look at what colors people automatically associated with good andevil respectively.

Methods. The two methods that are used in this paper is a survey in the form of a questionnaire andthe second method is a statistical hypothesis testing that was done on the data collected in the survey.The statistical hypothesis testing was done in the form of a chi-square test. From the chi-square testyou get a chi-square value and a p-value.

Results. The result of the survey was that most participants thought of green, white and blue as goodcolors, while black and red where thought of as evil. The statistical hypothesis testing revealed thatthere where a significant statistical difference when comparing two colors in all but two cases. Thosecases where white vs. blue and orange vs. purple.

Conclusions. The conclusions that can be drawn are that there is a significant statistical differencebetween how a color is perceived as good or evil. The perceived convention for what a good charactershould have, as a color is that it should be green and the perceived convention for an evil character isthat it should be either red or black.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 46 p.
Keyword [en]
Perception of Color, Games, Chi-Square Testing, Survey
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-14774OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-14774DiVA: diva2:1117842
Subject / course
UD1416 Bachelor's Thesis in Digital Game Development
Educational program
UDGTA Technical artist for games
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2017-06-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf