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Altered brain activities associated with cue reactivity during forced break in subjects with Internet gaming disorder
Zhejiang Normal University, CHI.
Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science.
Zhejiang Normal University, CHI.
Zhejiang Normal University, CHI.
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2020 (English)In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 102, article id 106203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies have proven that forced break can elicit strong psychological cravings for addictive behaviors. This phenomenon could create an excellent situation to study the neural underpinnings of addiction. The current study explores brain features during a cue-reactivity task in Internet gaming disorder (IGD) when participants were forced to stop their gaming behaviors. Methods: Forty-nine IGD subjects and forty-nine matched recreational Internet game users (RGU) were asked to complete a cue-reactivity task when their ongoing gaming behaviors were forced to break. We compared their brain responses to gaming cues and tried to find specific features associated with IGD. Results: Compared with RGU, the IGD subjects showed decreased activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), parahippocampal gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Significant negative correlations were observed between self-reported gaming cravings and the baseline activation level (bate value) of the ACC, DLPFC, and parahippocampal gyrus. Conclusions: IGD subjects were unable to suppress their gaming cravings after unexpectedly forced break. This result could also explain why RGU subjects are able to play online games without developing dependence. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2020. Vol. 102, article id 106203
Keywords [en]
Craving, Decision-making, Executive control, Forced break, Internet gaming disorder, adult, anterior cingulate, Article, association, attentional bias, brain function, clinical article, clinical feature, controlled study, decision making, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, executive function, female, game addiction, human, impulsiveness, male, parahippocampal gyrus, self report, task performance
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-19015DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106203Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85075712886OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-19015DiVA, id: diva2:1378258
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved

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