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Smart Glasses for Anesthesia Care: Initial Focus Group Interviews with Specialized Health Care Professionals
Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3348-4307
Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Smart glasses are a kind of wearable technology that gives users sustained, hands-free access to data and can transmit and receive information wirelessly. Earlier studies have suggested that smart glasses have the potential to improve patient safety in anesthesia care. Research regarding health care professionals' views of the potential use of smart glasses in anesthesia care is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe anesthesia health care professionals' views of smart glasses before clinical use. Design: A qualitative descriptive study. Methods: Data were collected from focus group interviews and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Findings: Three categories of participants' views of smart glasses were created during the analysis: views of integrating smart glasses in clinical setting; views of customized functionality of smart glasses; and views of being a user of smart glasses. One theme, striving for situational control, was identified in the analysis. Conclusions: Smart glasses were seen as a tool that can impact and improve access to patient-related information, and aid health care professionals in their struggle to gain situational control during anesthesia care. These are factors related to increased patient safety. (c) 2020 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC , 2021. Vol. 36, no 1, p. 47-53
Keywords [en]
anesthesia, smart glasses, physiological monitoring, patient safety, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-21367DOI: 10.1016/j.jopan.2020.06.019ISI: 000635450700010PubMedID: 33041201Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85092252548OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-21367DiVA, id: diva2:1548205
Note

open access

Available from: 2021-04-29 Created: 2021-04-29 Last updated: 2022-10-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Health Care Professionals’ Views of Smart Glasses for Vital Signs Monitoring in Complex Care Environments
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Care Professionals’ Views of Smart Glasses for Vital Signs Monitoring in Complex Care Environments
2022 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Monitoring patient vital signs is one of many important tasks for health care professionals in intensive care units and anaesthesia departments. Patient status can deteriorate in seconds, hence close surveillance is requisite for safe care. However, monitoring vital signs can be challenging in some situations. Smart glasses have been suggested for facilitating the monitoring of vital signs. To be useful, smart glasses require a customised application and must be integrated in the interacting work system. A work system comprises Person(s), Tasks, Technology and Tools, Organisation, and Environment. The work system affects care processes and outcomes, and one outcome is patient safety. 

The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate health care professionals’ views on and experiences of smart glasses, as well as whether smart glasses could influence patient safety in complex care environments. Five studies were conducted to answer the overall aim. A scoping review compiled previous research about smart glasses in complex care environments (Study I). Through focus group interviews, health care professionals’ views on smart glasses were collected (Studies II and III). Software developers used the knowledge generated to develop a smart glass application for vital signs monitoring. In individual interviews health care professionals shared their experiences’ using smart glasses for vital signs monitoring during clinical anaesthesia care (Study V). A database study was also conducted to describe burden of care related to monitoring (Study IV). The results were synthesised using SEIPS 2.0. 

The results presented in this thesis show that smart glasses can be used to monitor vital signs, and that they made it possible to monitor vital signs regardless of location. However, using smart glasses for vital signs monitoring requires further development to meet clinical needs. The complexity of care in intensive care units and at anaesthesia departments was evident, as were health care professionals’ responsibilities and their commitment to providing safe care for patients. 

This thesis concludes that adding smart glasses to the work system will affect other components of the work system and hence also processes and outcomes such as patient safety. Providing safe care for patients in complex care environments is challenging. The patient’s best is health care professionals’ highest priority, hence health care professionals are an asset for patient safety. To have positive impact on patient safety, new tools such as smart glasses must be designed to fit into the rest of the work system and to facilitate health care professionals’ work processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlskrona: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, 2022. p. 127
Series
Blekinge Institute of Technology Doctoral Dissertation Series, ISSN 1653-2090 ; 8
Keywords
Anesthesia Department, Hospital; Human Factors Engineering; Intensive Care Units; Monitoring, Physiologic; Nursing; Smart Glasses; Patient Safety.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Applied Health Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-23754 (URN)978-91-7295-445-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2022-12-09, J1630, Karlskrona, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2022-10-17 Created: 2022-10-14 Last updated: 2022-11-09Bibliographically approved

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Romare, CharlotteSkär, Lisa

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