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Prevalence and predictors of healthcare utilization among older people (60+); Focusing on ADL dependency and risk of depression
Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
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2012 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 54, no 3, 349-363 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate healthcare utilization patterns over a six-year period among older people (60+), classified as dependent/independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and/or at/not at risk of depression and to identify healthcare utilization predictors. A sample (n = 1402) comprising ten age cohorts aged between 60 and 96 years was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Baseline data were collected between 2001 and 2003. Number and length of hospital stays were collected for six years after baseline year. Group differences and mean changes over time were investigated. Healthcare utilization predictors were explored using multiple linear regression analysis. The results revealed that 21–24% had at least one hospital stay in the six years after baseline, 29–37% among ADL dependent subjects and 24–33% among those at risk of depression. There was a significant increase of hospital stays in all groups over time. ADL-dependent subjects and those at risk of depression had significant more hospital stays, except for those at/not at risk of depression in years 2, 4 and 5. The healthcare utilization predictors 5–6 years after baseline were mainly age, previous healthcare utilization and various symptoms and, in 1–2 and 3–4 years after baseline, age, various diagnostic groups and various physical variables. Thus healthcare utilization patterns seem to be similar for the different groups, but it is difficult to find universal predictors. This suggests that different variables should be considered, including both ADL and psychosocial variables, when trying to identify future healthcare users

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2012. Vol. 54, no 3, 349-363 p.
Keyword [en]
Older people, Healthcare utilization, ADL, Depression
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-7244DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2012.02.006ISI: 000302959400016Local ID: oai:bth.se:forskinfoE6DA51EFB245720FC1257A05004307A2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-7244DiVA: diva2:834834
Available from: 2012-09-24 Created: 2012-05-21 Last updated: 2017-04-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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