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A Multiple Software Approach to Understanding Values
Responsible organisation
2010 (English)Conference paper (Refereed) PublishedAlternative title
Mjukvarumetoder för att förstå värden (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

This study builds on two significant quotations, one contemporary and another historic. First of all, mixed methods are frequently confused with multiple methods. Leech, Onwuegbuzie, Hansson and Robinson (2008) describe the distinction as follows (emphasis by this author): “mixed methodologies is distinguished from multiple methodologies, wherein mixed methodologies refers to approaches in which quantitative and qualitative research techniques are integrated into a single study, whereas multiple methodologies refer to approaches in which more than one research method or data collection and analysis technique […] is used to address research questions.” It is hard to separate a combination of (mixed) methods deployed for choosing the proper techniques of a single study and another combination of (multiple) methods for answering a narrowly defined research question. Furthermore, in commenting on the fact that when we look at a problem from a social science perspective, the method we choose for doing so has twofold implications. To the effect of clarifying the inherent complexity, Vygotsky (1978) says the method is a “prerequisite and product; the tool and the result of the study”, continuing: “In general, any fundamentally new approach to a scientific problem inevitably leads to new methods of investigation and analysis. The invention of new methods that are adequate to the new ways in which problems are posed requires far more than a simple modification of previously accepted methods.” The purpose of research is to position the concept values in a scientific context covering a comprehensive corpus elicited from an online journal. The theoretical framework builds on an earlier study identifying global values across cultures. This study enables comparison between Anglo-Saxon on the one hand and other culturally determined understandings of values on the other, be they collective, individual or Western. Examples of allegedly global values include Security, Power, Universalism and Self-direction. The theoretical framework consists of a structured collection of analytical concepts like value direction, ethics, attitude and stability. The research design is made up of a combination of three similar but different text analytical-semantic-logical software packages. The software is deployed for identifying, characterizing and structuring values in some 300 scientific journal articles, complemented by the authors’ analysis of software output. Expected outcomes cover (i) validation of values, value directions (e.g. openness to change and self-enhancement) and value categorizations; (ii) identification of and comparison between national values; (iii) value descriptions. The relevance for research is that the results of this basic research will indicate what characterizes Scandinavian values and in the future provide refined methods for identifying values related to specific contexts, schools, industry, nursing, journalism etc. Educational research in the information society and among young internet cultures needs to focus on emerging internet ethics and there are several methodological options for gathering, categorizing and structuring empirical data on values and value systems in formal schooling and informal workplace contexts. This is an interdisciplinary approach to citizenship education. National education is a basis for active citizenship from any of the given local, regional, national etc. perspectives as they hold a potential to empower individuals for working life purposes, for individual development or for public life. This presentation combines research into the practical use of software packages facilitating interpretation of diverging values as portrayed in an interdisciplinary journal series. The practical usage for educational purposes aims at furthering people’s awareness of values. As knowledge is far from the only aspiration in schooling, exploration of values in a computermediated context combined with ethical citizenship supply a valid framing of the congress theme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Nordisk Förening för Pedagogisk Forskning , 2010.
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-7712Local ID: oai:bth.se:forskinfo4F81E4B3C75BC278C12577D0002E4366OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-7712DiVA: diva2:835361
Conference
NFPF/NERA 38th Congress
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2010-11-03 Last updated: 2015-06-30Bibliographically approved

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