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A FEEDFORWARD ACTIVE NOISE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR DUCTS USING A PASSIVE SILENCER TO REDUCE ACOUSTIC FEEDBACK
Responsible organisation
2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ventilation systems installed in buildings usually generate low-frequency noise because the passive silencers commonly used to attenuate the ventilation noise are not effective in the low-frequency range. A method proven to effectively reduce low-frequency noise in a wide variety of applications is active noise control (ANC). A feedforward ANC system applied to duct noise normally uses a reference microphone, a control unit, a loudspeaker to generate the secondary noise created by the controller, and an error microphone. The secondary noise generated by the loudspeaker will travel both downstream canceling the primary noise, and upstream to the reference microphone, i.e. acoustic feedback. The acoustic feedback may result in performance reduction and stability problems of the control system. Common approaches to solve the feedback problem result in more complex controller structures and/or system configurations than the simple feedforward controller, e.g. introducing a feedback cancellation filter in the controller in parallel with the acoustic feedback path, or using a dual-microphone reference sensing system. This paper presents a simple approach to reduce the acoustic feedback by using a basic feedforward controller in combination with a passive silencer. Simulations show that efficient acoustic feedback cancellation is achieved by using a passive silencer. In the experimental setup another advantage with using a passive silencer is that the frequency response function of the forward path, which is to be estimated, is smoother, i.e. most of the dominant frequency peaks in the frequency response function when not using a passive silencer is reduced. This in turn results in an acoustic path that is less complex to estimate with high accuracy using an adaptive FIR filter steered with the LMS algorithm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cairns, Australia, 2007.
Keyword [en]
Signal Processing, Active Noise Control, Ducts, Acoustics, Silencer
National Category
Signal Processing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-9034Local ID: oai:bth.se:forskinfo92C2CC94DBD553D6C12573370071BF9FOAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-9034DiVA: diva2:836810
Conference
ICSV 14
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2007-08-14 Last updated: 2015-06-30Bibliographically approved

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fulltext(1347 kB)32 downloads
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Johansson, SvenHåkansson, LarsClaesson, Ingvar
Signal Processing

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf