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Quantifying usability: an evaluation of a diabetes mHealth system on effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction metrics with associated user characteristics
Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9854-7690
2016 (English)In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 23, no 1, 5-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Mobile health (mHealth) systems are becoming more common for chronic disease management, but usability studies are still needed on patients' perspectives and mHealth interaction performance. This deficiency is addressed by our quantitative usability study of a mHealth diabetes system evaluating patients' task performance, satisfaction, and the relationship of these measures to user characteristics. Materials and Methods We used metrics in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 standard. After standardized training, 10 patients performed representative tasks and were assessed on individual task success, errors, efficiency (time on task), satisfaction (System Usability Scale [SUS]) and user characteristics. Results Tasks of exporting and correcting values proved the most difficult, had the most errors, the lowest task success rates, and consumed the longest times on task. The average SUS satisfaction score was 80.5, indicating good but not excellent system usability. Data trends showed males were more successful in task completion, and younger participants had higher performance scores. Educational level did not influence performance, but a more recent diabetes diagnosis did. Patients with more experience in information technology (IT) also had higher performance rates. Discussion Difficult task performance indicated areas for redesign. Our methods can assist others in identifying areas in need of improvement. Data about user background and IT skills also showed how user characteristics influence performance and can provide future considerations for targeted mHealth designs. Conclusion Using the ISO 9241-11 usability standard, the SUS instrument for satisfaction and measuring user characteristics provided objective measures of patients' experienced usability. These could serve as an exemplar for standardized, quantitative methods for usability studies on mHealth systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016. Vol. 23, no 1, 5-11 p.
Keyword [en]
diabetes; mobile health; self-management; usability evaluation; user-centered design
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-11378DOI: 10.1093/jamia/ocv099ISI: 000374179500003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-11378DiVA: diva2:892108
Available from: 2016-01-08 Created: 2016-01-08 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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