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  • 1.
    Behrens, Anders
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sleep disturbance predicts worse cognitive performance in subsequent years: A longitudinal population-based cohort study2023In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 106, article id 104899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Poor sleep is a potential modifiable risk factor for later life development cognitive impairment. The aim of this study is to examine if subjective measures of sleep duration and sleep disturbance predict future cognitive decline in a population-based cohort of 60, 66, 72 and 78-year-olds with a maximal follow up time of 18 years. Methods: This study included participants from the Swedish National Study on Ageing and Care – Blekinge, with assessments 2001–2021. A cohort of 60 (n = 478), 66 (n = 623), 72 (n = 662) and 78 (n = 548) year-olds, were assessed at baseline and every 6 years until 78 years of age. Longitudinal associations between sleep disturbance (sleep scale), self-reported sleep duration and cognitive tests (Mini Mental State Examination and the Clock drawing test) were examined together with typical confounders (sex, education level, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, physical inactivity and depression). Results: There was an association between sleep disturbance at age 60 and worse cognitive function at ages 60, 66 and 72 years in fully adjusted models. The association was attenuated after bootstrap-analysis for the 72-year-olds. The items of the sleep scale most predictive of later life cognition regarded nightly awakenings, pain and itching and daytime naps. Long sleep was predictive of future worse cognitive function. Conclusion: Sleep disturbance was associated with worse future cognitive performance for the 60-year-olds, which suggests poor sleep being a risk factor for later life cognitive decline. Questions regarding long sleep, waking during the night, pain and itching and daytime naps should be further explored in future research and may be targets for intervention. © 2022

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  • 2.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NLD.
    Aartsen, Marja
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NLD.
    Wahlberg, Maria
    Aging Research Centre, SWE.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University, SWE.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Deeg, Dorly
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NLD.
    A cross-national and longitudinal study on predictors in starting and stopping Internet use (2001-2013) by Swedish and Dutch older adults 66 years and above2016In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 157-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Internet and information communication technology is today considered as a means to sustain active and healthy aging, and to provide better care for the aging population. There is an increase in prevalence in older adults using the Internet, however many are still not using the Internet. This study therefore, investigated predictors in starting and stopping Internet use by older adults between 2001-2013 in Sweden and the Netherlands. These represent currently two of the highest older adult Internet users in Europe. The aim of this study was to examine, first, if there was a different starting and stopping rate in Sweden and the Netherlands; second, if the predictors age, gender, education, rural/urban living, living alone/not, cognition and functional limitations have different effects in either country. Methods A cross-national and longitudinal design was chosen. Data was used from the Longitudinal Aging study Amsterdam (LASA) and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Cox regression analyses were done to test the predictors over time with starting or stopping Internet use. An interaction term ‘variable*country’ was then considered for each variable, if significant, leading to a stratification into a multivariate model per country. Results More older adults started use in the Netherlands (19%); lower in age, normal cognitive functioning, living alone, fewer functional limitations and lower education were predictive of starting. In Sweden fewer started (10.3%), where being female was the only significant predictor of starting use. Both countries did not have many people stopping use; in the Netherlands (3%) they were younger in age and living urban, whereas in Sweden (1.7%), they had lower cognitive functioning. Conclusion Results indicate that there are differences between countries in starting use. These differences can possibly be explained by the early adoption of the Internet in Sweden. The new findings that the older adults living alone and lower educated are now going online, are positive regarding the theme of active aging. For those stopping use, the differences are more country-specific. More research is needed in order to understand better what an older adult was using the Internet for and why they stop. © 2016. Gerontechnology. All Rights Reserved.

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  • 3.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Moraes, Ana Luiza Dallora
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Palm, Bruna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Five-factor model, technology enthusiasm and technology anxiety2023In: Digital Health, E-ISSN 2055-2076, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults need to participate in the digital society, as societal and personal changes and what they do with the remaining time that they have in their older years has an undeniable effect on motivation, cognition and emotion. Changes in personality traits were investigated in older adults over the period 2019–2021. Technology enthusiasm and technology anxiety are attitudes that affect the relationship to the technology used. The changes in the score of technology enthusiasm and technology anxiety were the dependent variables. They were investigated with personality traits, age, gender, education, whether someone lives alone, cognitive function, digital social participation (DSP) and health literacy as predictors of the outcome. The Edwards-Nunnally index and logistic regression were used. The results indicated that DSP, lower age, lower neuroticism and higher education were indicative of less technology anxiety. High DSP and high extraversion are indicative of technology enthusiasm. DSP and attitude towards technology seem to be key in getting older adults to stay active online. © The Author(s) 2023.

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  • 4.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Moraes, Ana Luiza Dallora
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Technology anxiety and technology enthusiasm versus digital ageism2022In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Europe has called attention to the importance of the e-inclusion of older adults. Society is indicating that the developers, websites, and devices are causing age bias in technology. This affects living independently, the values of ethical principles associated with an older person, and digital ageism: which is an age-related bias in artificial intelligence systems. Objective: This research attempts to investigate the instrument technology anxiety and enthusiasm, and assistive technology devices during the period 2019- 2021. This instrument may be a way to redress misconceptions about digital ageism. The assistive technology device that we will investigate in this study is the adoption of a service that is designed for online health consultations. Method: The participants are part of the longitudinal Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. Technology anxiety and technology enthusiasm are two factors, which aim to measure technophilia (vs technophobia) in older adults. The age range is 63 -99 years of age in 2019 T1 and 66 -101 in 2021 T2. Wilcoxon rank test was conducted to investigate technology enthusiasm, technology anxiety, and how they changed with time. An Edwards Nunnally index was then calculated for both variables to observe a significant change in score from T1 to T2. Mann Whitney U test was used to investigate the variables sex and health status with technology anxiety & technology enthusiasm in T1 & T2. Age, Cognitive function MMSE, and digital social participation were investigated through a Kruskall-Wallis test. A logistic regression was conducted with the significant variable. Results: Between 2019-2021, change in technology enthusiasm was based on less digital social participation (OR: 0.608; CI 95%: 0.476- 0.792). Technology anxiety was significantly higher due to age (OR: 1.086, CI 95%: 1.035-1.139) and less digital social participation (OR: 0.684; CI 95%: 0.522- 0.895). The want for online healthcare consultations was popular but usage was low. Conclusion: Staying active on- line and participating digitally may be a way to reduce digital ageism. However, digital ageism is a complex phenomenon, which requires different solutions in order to include older people and reduce an inaccurate categorisation of this group in the digital society.

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  • 5.
    Christiansen, Line
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Univ Skovde, Skovde, Sweden..
    Cellek, Selim
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, GBR.
    Zhang, Jufen
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, GBR.
    Lemmens, Evi
    Univ Coll Leuven Limburg, BEL.
    Garolera, Maite
    Consorci Sanitari Terrassa, Brain Cognit & Behav Clin ReBarcelona, ESP.
    Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin
    Reg Univ Hosp Malaga, ESP.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Associations Between Mobile Health Technology use and Self-rated Quality of Life: A Cross-sectional Study on Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment2021In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is affected even at early stages in older adults with cognitive impairment. The use of mobile health (mHealth) technology can offer support in daily life and improve the physical and mental health of older adults. However, a clarification of how mHealth technology can be used to support the QoL of older adults with cognitive impairment is needed. Objective: To investigate factors affecting mHealth technology use in relation to self-rated QoL among older adults with cognitive impairment. Methods: A cross-sectional research design was used to analyse mHealth technology use and QoL in 1,082 older participants. Baseline data were used from a multi-centered randomized controlled trial including QoL, measured by the Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease (QoL-AD) Scale, as the outcome variable. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: Having moderately or high technical skills in using mHealth technology and using the internet via mHealth technology on a daily or weekly basis was associated with good to excellent QoL in older adults with cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The variation in technical skills and internet use among the participants can be interpreted as an obstacle for mHealth technology to support QoL.

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    Associations Between Mobile Health Technology use and Self-rated Quality of Life
  • 6.
    Elmståhl, Sölve I.
    et al.
    Lund University, SWE.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Fagerstrom, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Linnaeus University, SWE.
    Ekström, Henrik
    Lund University, SWE.
    The life satisfaction index-a (LSI-A): Normative data for a general swedish population aged 60 to 93 years2020In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 15, p. 2031-2039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of Study: To gain Swedish norm value for the Life Satisfaction Index-A (LSI-A) in a population 60–93+ years old stratified for sex and age and to relate these norm values with respect to number of chronic diseases and functional impairment. Materials and Methods: The study population included a random sample of 2656 men (45.7%) and 3159 (54.3%) women from the longitudinal national studies’ “Good Aging in Skåne” (GÅS) and SNAC-B, both part of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Data on Neugartens Life Satisfaction Index-A (LSI-A), medical history, activities of daily life (ADL) and socio-demographics were collected through structured interviews and questionnaires. Results: Men scored significantly higher than women; 28.5, sd=6.9, and 27.3, sd=6.6, respectively, out of maximum 40 points. For both genders the scores decreased with age, mean score 6.0 points, lower for men and 7.1 points lower for women between 60 and 93+ years. The highest score was noted for healthy individuals where both men and women scored 29.5 points, sd=6.2. Increased number of chronic diseases and dependency in ADLs were associated with lower LS. Conclusion: Norm values here presented may facilitate assessments and evaluation of life satisfaction in the general elder population and as reference values to clinical trials. Female sex, rising age, morbidity and impaired functional ability were all associated with impaired LS. © 2020 Elmståhl et al.

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  • 7.
    Lindvall, Agneta
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Holst, Göran
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Informal Care Provided by Family Caregivers Experiences of Older Adults With Multimorbidity2016In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 0098-9134, E-ISSN 1938-243X, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal care given by family caregivers is an important part of the total care provided to older adults with multimorbidity. The current study aimed to describe how older adults with multimorbidity experienced care from family caregivers. Interviews were conducted with 24 participants (mean age = 86 years). Older adults with multimorbidity felt gratitude toward family caregivers for their willingness to help with everyday life and for representing their interests in contacts with health care providers. Family caregivers also had a significant impact on older adults' psychological well-being. However, the results also showed that older adults often felt they were a burden to their family caregivers and that their independence might be reduced. Older adults with multimorbidity should have the opportunity to be more involved in and have more influence over their health care so that they do not have to depend on representation by family caregivers.

  • 8.
    Niklasson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University.
    Backåberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnaeus University.
    Daily activity patterns in older adults receiving initial support: the association between daily steps and sitting in bouts of at least 60 min2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aging has a significant impact on health, underlining the importance of maintaining physical function and reducing time spent sitting among older adults. To understand how to reduce prolonged sitting or increase physical activity, factors related to the daily living and observed daily activity patterns should be explored. This study aimed to investigate the association between daily steps, self-rated health, physical activity, sedentary behavior, motivation to exercise and fear of falling among older adults receiving initial support. Method: Cross-sectional design with total population questionnaire data from adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 917), living at home with initial support from municipal care in southern Sweden. The older adults were offered to participate in a follow-up study measuring daily activity patterns with accelerometers (n = 72). Linear regression was used to analyze associations between daily steps and possible predictors. Results: The linear model ($$ {R}^{2}= $$ 0.478) showed that sitting in unbroken bouts of > 60 min (β = -0.313, p < 0.05), walking independently outdoors (β = 0.301, p < 0.05), intending to increase physical activity (β = -0.294, p < 0.05), sex (β = 0.279, p < 0.05), relative autonomy index (β = 0.258, p < 0.05), fear of falling (β = -0.238, p < 0.05), and self-rated health (β = 0.213, p < 0.05) predicted daily steps. Conclusion: The model of predictors brings new understanding regarding daily steps among community-dwelling older adults. The association between sitting in bouts of > 60 min and daily steps is interesting as 35% of participants had a number of sitting bouts that on average, showed 30% less steps taken. Minimizing long sitting bouts and maintaining physical functioning to promote independence when walking outdoors can be tools for clinical practitioners devising interventions to break prolonged sitting among community-dwelling older adults. Future research should prioritize studying older adults’ outdoor walking independence, including its relation to walking with or without assistive devices and its impact on physical activity and sedentary behavior. © 2024, The Author(s).

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