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  • 1. Ademovski, Seida
    et al.
    Persson, Gösta Rutger
    Winkel, Edwin
    Tangerman, Albert
    Lingström, Peter
    Renvert, Stefan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    The short-term treatment effects on the microbiota at the dorsum of the tongue in intra-oral halitosis patients-a randomized clinical trial2013In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to assess the effects of rinsing with zinc- and chlorhexidine-containing mouth rinse with or without adjunct tongue scraping on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in breath air, and the microbiota at the dorsum of the tongue. Material and methods: A randomized single-masked controlled clinical trial with a cross-over study design over 14 days including 21 subjects was performed. Bacterial samples from the dorsum of the tongue were assayed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Results: No halitosis (identified by VSC assessments) at day 14 was identified in 12/21 subjects with active rinse alone, in 10/21with adjunct use of tongue scraper, in 1/21 for negative control rinse alone, and in 3/21 in the control and tongue scraping sequence. At day 14, significantly lower counts were identified only in the active rinse sequence (p < 0.001) for 15/78 species including, Fusobacterium sp., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Tannerella forsythia. A decrease in bacteria from baseline to day 14 was found in successfully treated subjects for 9/74 species including: P. gingivalis, Prevotella melaninogenica, S. aureus, and Treponema denticola. Baseline VSC scores were correlated with several bacterial species. The use of a tongue scraper combined with active rinse did not change the levels of VSC compared to rinsing alone. Conclusions: VSC scores were not associated with bacterial counts in samples taken from the dorsum of the tongue. The active rinse alone containing zinc and chlorhexidine had effects on intra-oral halitosis and reduced bacterial counts of species associated with malodor. Tongue scraping provided no beneficial effects on the microbiota studied. Clinical relevance: Periodontally healthy subjects with intra-oral halitosis benefit from daily rinsing with zinc- and chlorhexidine-containing mouth rinse.

  • 2. Hallström, Hadar
    et al.
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Stromberg, Ulf
    Twetman, Svante
    Renvert, Stefan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Reproducibility of subgingival bacterial samples from patients with peri-implant mucositis2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1063-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility of bacterial enumeration from subsequent subgingival samples collected from patients with peri-implant mucositis. Material and methods Duplicate microbial samples from 222 unique implant sites in 45 adult subjects were collected with paper points and analyzed using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. Whole genomic probes of 74 preselected bacterial species were used. Based on the bacterial scores, Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to calculate the inter-annotator agreement for categorical data. The percentage agreement was considered as "good" when the two samples showed the same score or differed by 1 to the power of 10. Results Moderate to fair kappa values were displayed for all bacterial species in the test panel (range 0.21-0.58). There were no significant differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. The percentage of good agreement between the first and second samples averaged 74.7 % (n=74; range 56-83 %), while the proportion of poor agreement ranged from 1 to 19 % for the various strains. Conclusion While an acceptable clinical agreement was obtained in most cases, diverging bacterial scores may appear in subgingival samples collected at the same time point from patients with peri-implant mucositis. Clinical relevance The broad bulky base of implant crowns may present an obstacle for the collection of reproducible subgingival samples with paper points.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    Halland Hospital, SWE.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Periodontitis, tooth loss and cognitive functions among older adults2018In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 2103-2109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the potential association between periodontitis, the number of teeth and cognitive functions in a cohort of older adults in Sweden. Material and methods: In total, 775 individuals from 60 to 99 years of age were selected for the study. A clinical and radiographic examination was performed. The number of teeth and prevalence of periodontal pockets and bone loss was calculated and categorised. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and clock test. The education level was obtained from a questionnaire. Data were analysed using chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Age and gender were associated with the prevalence of bone loss. Age and education were associated with lower number of teeth. Gender was also associated with the presence of pockets. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant association between prevalence of bone loss, the number of teeth and the outcome on MMSE test. This association remained even after adjustment for age, education and gender. Tooth loss was also associated with lower outcome on clock test. Presence of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm was not associated with cognitive test outcome. Conclusions: A history of periodontitis and tooth loss may be of importance for cognitive functions among older adults. Clinical relevance: Diseases with and inflammatory profile may have an impact on cognitive decline. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature

  • 4.
    Renvert, Stefan
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Wallin-Bengtsson, Viveca
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    G Persson, Rutger
    Peridontitis in older Swedish individuals fails to predict mortality2015In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to assess mortality risk and its association to health aspects in dentate individuals 60 years of age and older. Medical and periodontal data from 870 dentate individuals (age range 60-96) participating in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Blekinge (SNAC-Blekinge) with survival statistics over 6 years were studied. During 6 years of follow-up, 42/474 of the individuals (8.9 %), who at baseline were between age 60 and 75, and 134/396 individuals of the individuals (33.9 %), who at baseline were ≥75 years, died. Surviving dentate individuals had more teeth (mean 19.3, S.D. ± 7.9) than those who died (mean 15.9, S.D. ± 7.3; mean diff 3,3; S.E. mean diff 0.7; 95 % CI 2.0, 4.6; p = 0.001). A self-reported history of high blood pressure (F = 15.0, p < 0.001), heart failure (F = 24.5, p < 0.001, observed power = 0.99), older age (F = 34.7, p < 0.001), male gender (F = 6.3, p < 0.01), serum HbA1c with 6.5 % as cutoff level (F = 9.3, p = 0.002) were factors associated with mortality. A medical diagnosis of heart disease, diabetes, any form of cancer, or periodontitis failed to predict mortality. A self-reported history of angina pectoris, chronic heart failure, elevated serum HbA1c, and few remaining teeth were associated with mortality risk. A professional diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, or periodontitis was not predictive of mortality. Self-health reports are important to observe in the assessment of disease and survival in older individual.

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