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  • 1. Figuero, Elena
    et al.
    Lindahl, Christel
    Marin, MJ
    Renvert, Stefan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Herrera, David
    Ohlsson, Ola
    Wetterling, Thomas
    Sanz, Mariano
    Quantification of Periodontal Pathogens in Vascular, Blood, and Subgingival Samples From Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease or Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms2014In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 85, no 9, p. 1182-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this investigation is to quantify periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Campylobacter rectus, and Tannerella forsythia) in vascular, blood, and subgingival samples. As a secondary objective, two molecular bacterial identification methods (nested polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and quantitative PCR [qPCR]) are compared. Methods: Seventy consecutive patients provided a vascular lesion, a blood sample, and 36 subgingival samples. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and qPCR was used to determine the prevalence and amounts of the target pathogens in each sample. Nested PCR was performed only in the samples from vascular lesions. Periodontal examination was performed in 42 patients. Mann-Whitney U or x(2) tests were used to compare microbiologic results according to periodontal diagnosis. Results: All targeted periodontal pathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, or C. rectus) were detected in subgingival samples, with a prevalence rate of 72.2%, 47.2%, 74.3%, and 82.9%, respectively. In 7.1% and 11.4% of vascular and blood samples, bacterial DNA was detected. One patient was positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans in the three types of samples. No differences were found in the levels of targeted bacteria when comparing patients with and without periodontitis. Prevalence rates obtained with nested PCR were significantly higher than those obtained with qPCR. Conclusions: The presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was demonstrated in vascular, blood, and subgingival samples in one of 36 patients. These results, although with a very low frequency, may support the hypothesis of a translocation of periodontal pathogens from subgingival microbiota to the bloodstream and then to atheromatous plaques in carotid or other peripheral arteries. Nested PCR is not an adequate method for identifying DNA of periodontal pathogens in low quantities because of the high number of false-negative results.

  • 2. Persson, Rutger
    et al.
    Jansåker, Ann-Marie Roos
    Lindahl, Christel
    Renvert, Stefan
    Microbiologic results after Non-surgical Erbium-doped:Yttrium, aluminum, and garnet laser or Air-abrasive treatment of Peri-implantitis: A randomized clinical trial2011In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 82, no 9, p. 1267-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The purpose of this study is to assess clinical and microbiologic effects of the non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis lesions using either an erbium-doped:yttrium, aluminum, and garnet (Er:YAG) laser or an air-abrasive subgingival polishing method. Methods: In a 6-month clinical trial, 42 patients with periimplantitis were treated at one time with an Er:YAG laser or an air-abrasive device. Routine clinical methods were used to monitor clinical conditions. Baseline and 6-month intraoral radiographs were assessed with a software program. The checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was used to assess 74 bacterial species from the site with the deepest probing depth (PD) at the implant. Non-parametric tests were applied to microbiology data. Results: PD reductions (mean - SD) were 0.9 - 0.8 mm and 0.8 - 0.5 mm in the laser and air-abrasive groups, respectively (not significant). No baseline differences in bacterial counts between groupswere found. In the air-abrasive group, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, andStaphylococcus anaerobius were found at lower counts at 1 month after therapy (P <0.001) and with lower counts in the laser group for Fusobacteriumnucleatumnaviforme( P = 0.002), and Fusobacterium nucleatum nucleatum (P = 0.002). Both treatments failed to reduce bacterial counts at 6 months. Porphyromonas gingivalis counts were higher in cases with progressive peri-implantitis (P <0.001). Conclusions: At 1 month, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. anaerobius were reduced in the air-abrasive group, and Fusobacterium spp. were reduced in the laser group. Six-month data demonstrated that both methods failed to reduce bacterial counts. Clinical improvements were limited.

  • 3.
    Renvert, Stefan
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Rigmor E.
    Persson, Rutger G.
    Tooth loss and periodontitis in older individuals: results from the Swedish national study on aging and care.2013In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 84, no 8, p. 1134-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Due to the increasing number of older people, there is a need for studies focused on this population. The aims of the present study are to assess oral and systemic conditions in individuals aged 60 to 95 years with access to dental insurance. Methods: Probing depths (PDs), tooth loss, alveolar bone levels, and systemic health were studied among a representative cohort of older individuals. Results: A total of 1,147 individuals in young-old (aged 60 or 67 years), old (aged 72 or 78 years), and old-old (aged ≥81 years) age groups were enrolled, including 200 individuals who were edentulous, in this study. Annual dental care was received by 82% of dentate individuals. Systemic diseases were common (diabetes: 5.8%; cardiovascular diseases: 20.7%; obesity: 71.2%; elevated C-reactive protein [CRP]: 98.4%). Serum CRP values were unrelated to periodontal conditions. Rates of periodontitis, defined as ≥30% of sites with a distance from cemento-enamel junction to bone of ≥5 mm, were 11.2% in women in the young-old age group and 44.9% in men in the old-old age group. Individuals in older age groups had a higher likelihood of periodontitis defined by bone loss and cutoff levels of PD ≥5 mm (odds ratio: 1.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 2.5; P <0.01). A total of 7% of individuals in the old-old age group had ≥20 teeth and no periodontitis. Systemic diseases, dental use, or smoking were not explanatory, whereas age and sex were explanatory for periodontitis. Conclusions: The prevalence of periodontitis increased with age. Sex seems to be the dominant explanatory factor for periodontitis in older individuals. Despite frequent dental visits, overall oral health in the oldest age cohort was poor.

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