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  • 1.
    Jerčić, Petar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, SWE.
    Lindley, Craig
    Computational Modelling Group, Data61, CSIRO, AUS.
    An affective serious game for collaboration between humans and robots2019In: Entertainment Computing, ISSN 1875-9521, E-ISSN 1875-953X, Vol. 32, article id 100319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elicited physiological affect in humans collaborating with their robot partners was investigated to determine its influence on decision-making performance in serious games. A turn-taking version of the Tower of Hanoi game was used, where physiological arousal and valence underlying such human-robot proximate collaboration were investigated. A comparable decision performance in the serious game was found between human and non-humanoid robot arm collaborator conditions, while higher physiological affect was found in humans collaborating with such robot collaborators. It is suggested that serious games which are carefully designed to take into consideration the elicited physiological arousal might witness a better decision-making performance and more positive valence using non-humanoid robot partners instead of human ones. © 2019 The Authors

  • 2.
    Jerčić, Petar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Sundstedt, Veronica
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Practicing Emotion-Regulation Through Biofeedback on the Decision-Making Performance in the Context of Serious Games: a Systematic Review2019In: Entertainment Computing, ISSN 1875-9521, E-ISSN 1875-953X, Vol. 29, p. 75-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence shows that emotions critically influence human decision-making. Therefore, emotion-regulation using biofeedback has been extensively investigated. Nevertheless, serious games have emerged as a valuable tool for such investigations set in the decision-making context. This review sets out to investigate the scientific evidence regarding the effects of practicing emotion-regulation through biofeedback on the decision-making performance in the context of serious games. A systematic search of five electronic databases (Scopus, Web of Science, IEEE, PubMed Central, Science Direct), followed by the author and snowballing investigation, was conducted from a publication's year of inception to October 2018. The search identified 16 randomized controlled experiment/quasi-experiment studies that quantitatively assessed the performance on decision-making tasks in serious games, involving students, military, and brain-injured participants. It was found that the participants who raised awareness of emotions and increased the skill of emotion-regulation were able to successfully regulate their arousal, which resulted in better decision performance, reaction time, and attention scores on the decision-making tasks. It is suggested that serious games provide an effective platform validated through the evaluative and playtesting studies, that supports the acquisition of the emotion-regulation skill through the direct (visual) and indirect (gameplay) biofeedback presentation on decision-making tasks.

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