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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sjöstrom-Strand, Annica
    Lunds universitet, SWE.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, SWE.
    Registered nurses’ descriptions of caring: a phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id Article number 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ conceptions of caring. Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth’s description of phenomenography. Results: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses’ perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient’s best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. Conclusion: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses’ collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care.

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  • 2.
    Glantz, Andreas
    et al.
    Region Skåne, SWE.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö Högskola, SWE.
    Sandström, Boel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    "how do we use the time?": An observational study measuring the task time distribution of nurses in psychiatric care2019In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The nurse's primary task in psychiatric care should be to plan for the patient's care in cooperation with the patient and spend the time needed to build a relationship. Psychiatric care nurses however claim that they lack the necessary time to communicate with patients. To investigate the validity of such claims, this time-motion study aimed at identifying how nurses working at inpatient psychiatric wards distribute their time between a variety of tasks during a working day. Methods: During the period of December 2015 and February 2016, a total of 129 h and 23 min of structured observations of 12 nurses were carried out at six inpatient wards at one psychiatric clinic in southern Sweden. Time, frequency of tasks and number of interruptions were recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Administering drugs or medications accounted for the largest part of the measured time (17.5%) followed by indirect care (16%). Relatively little time was spent on direct care, the third largest category in the study (15.3%), while an unexpectedly high proportion of time (11.3%) was spent on ward related tasks. Nurses were also interrupted in 75% of all medication administering tasks. Conclusions: Nurses working in inpatient psychiatric care spend little time in direct contact with the patients and medication administration is interrupted very often. As a result, it is difficult to establish therapeutic relationships with patients. This is an area of concern for both patient safety and nurses' job satisfaction. © 2019 The Author(s).

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    How do we use time
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