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  • 1.
    Gorschek, Tony
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Gomes, Andrigo
    Pettersson, Andreas
    Torkar, Richard
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Introduction of a Process Maturity Model for Market-driven Product Management and Requirements engineering2012In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 83-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The area of software product development of software intensive products has received much attention, especially in the area of requirements engineering and product management. Many companies are faced with new challenges when operating in an environment where potential requirements number in thousands or even tens of thousands, and where a product does not have a customer, but any number of customers or markets. The development organization carries not only all the costs of development, but also takes all the risks. In this environment traditional bespoke requirements engineering, together with traditional process assessment and improvement models fall short as they do not address the unique challenges of a market-driven environment. This paper introduces the Market-driven Requirements Engineering Process Model, aimed at enabling process improvement and process assurance for organizations faced with these new challenges. The model is also validated in the industry through three case studies where the model is used for process assessment and improvement suggestion. Initial results show that the model is appropriate for process improvement for organizations operating in a market-driven environment. In addition, the model was designed to be light weight in terms of low cost and thus adapted not only for large organizations but suitable for small and medium enterprises as well.

  • 2.
    Jalali, Samireh
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Wohlin, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Global software engineering and agile practices: a systematic review2012In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 24, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile practices have received attention from industry as an alternative to plan-driven software development approaches. Agile encourages, for example, small self-organized collocated teams, whereas global software engineering (GSE) implies distribution across cultural, temporal, and geographical boundaries. Hence, combining them is a challenge. A systematic review was conducted to capture the status of combining agility with GSE. The results were limited to peer-reviewed conference papers or journal articles, published between 1999 and 2009. The synthesis was made through classifying the papers into different categories (e.g. publication year, contribution type, research method). At the end, 81 papers were judged as primary for further analysis. The distribution of papers over the years indicated that GSE and Agile in combination has received more attention in the last 5 years. However, the majority of the existing research is industrial experience reports in which Agile practices were modified with respect to the context and situational requirements. The emergent need in this research area is suggested to be developing a framework that considers various factors from different perspectives when incorporating Agile in GSE. Practitioners may use it as a decision-making basis in early phases of software development.

  • 3. Khurum, Mahvish
    et al.
    Gorschek, Tony
    A method for alignment evaluation of product strategies among stakeholders (MASS) in software intensive product development2011In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 494-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current practices in the industry are moving towards the market-driven development of software intensive products compared to customer-specific system development. Consequently, product management is faced with several challenges that have to be addressed as a part of the market-driven requirements engineering process. One of the important challenges is how to select the right mix of requirements, balancing short-term and long-term gains. One way to address this challenge is to utilize product strategies for selecting requirements. However, in order to do this the internal success-critical stakeholders (SCS) involved in strategies creation and requirements selection need to be aligned with respect to a product's strategic goals and objectives. This paper presents a method to enable the evaluation of degree of alignment between SCS with respect to the understanding and interpretation of a product's strategy. Further, the method not only enables the evaluation of alignment, but also specifically shows misalignment, and enables the identification of leading causes. The method has been developed in collaboration with the industry and its application is shown through a case study at Ericsson AB

  • 4.
    Khurum, Mahvish
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Wilson, Magnus
    The software value map—an exhaustive collection of value aspects for the development of software intensive products2013In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 711-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In software intensive products such as cars or telecom systems, software has traditionally been associated with cost, and there has been no real perception of its value in relation to the entire product offering. However, because software is becoming a larger part of the main competitive advantage, driving innovation and product differentiation, hardware is becoming more standardized, thus the valuation of software is becoming critical. In existing literature, several value constructs and corresponding valuation/measurement solutions needed for making decisions about software product development are presented. However, the contributions are often isolated with respect to a certain perspective such as focusing on product's internal or external quality aspects only. Consequently, a complete view of value constructs relevant from different perspectives required for making decisions about software product development is missing. This paper presents a consolidated view of the software value concept utilizing the major perspectives and introduces a software value map. The created value map was evaluated through an industry case study through the development of impact evaluation patterns, which were subsequently used by professionals in industry, and experiences gathered. During industry evaluation, practitioners found substantial benefits of having a consolidated, vastly improved, and extended value aspect's view of software. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 5. Ohlsson, MC
    et al.
    Andrews, Anneliese Amschler
    Wohlin, Claes
    Modelling fault-proneness statistically over a sequence of releases: a case study2001In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, p. 167-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of today's software systems evolve through a series of releases that add new functionality and features, in addition to the results of corrective maintenance. As the systems evolve over time it is necessary to keep track of and manage their problematic components. Our focus is to track system evolution and to react before the systems become difficult to maintain. To do the tracking, we use a method based on a selection of statistical techniques. In the case study we report here that had historical data available primarily on corrective maintenance, we apply the method to four releases of a system consisting of 130 components. In each release, components are classified as fault-prone if the number of defect reports written against them are above a certain threshold. The outcome from the case study shows stabilizing principal components over the releases, and classification trees with lower thresholds in their decision nodes. Also, the variables used in the classification trees' decision nodes are related to changes in the same files. The discriminant functions use more variables than the classification trees and are more difficult to interpret. Box plots highlight the findings from the other analyses. The results show that for a context of corrective maintenance, principal components analysis together with classification trees are good descriptors for tracking software evolution, Copyright (C) 2001 John Wiley gr Sons, Ltd.

  • 6.
    Petersen, Kai
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Roos, Peter
    Nyström, Staffan
    Runeson, Per
    Early identification of bottlenecks in very large scale system of systems software development2014In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 1150-1171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    System of systems are of high complexity, and for each system, many different requirements are implemented in parallel. Systems are developed with some degree of managerial independence but later on have to work together. In this situation, many requirements are written, implemented, and tested in parallel for different systems that are to be integrated. This makes identifying bottlenecks challenging, and visualizations often used on project level (such as Kanban boards or burndown charts) have to be extended/complemented to cope with the increased complexity. In response to these challenges, the contributions of this study are to propose the following: (i) a visualization for early identification and proactive removal of bottlenecks; (ii) a visualization to check on the success of bottleneck resolution; and (iii) to provide an industry evaluation of the visualizations in a case study of a system of systems developed at Ericsson AB in Sweden. The feedback by the practitioners showed that the visualizations were perceived as useful in improving throughput and lead time. The quantitative analysis showed that the visualizations were able in identifying bottlenecks and showing improvements or the lack thereof. On the basis of the qualitative and quantitative data collected, we conclude that the visualizations are useful in bottleneck identification and resolution.

  • 7.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Wohlin, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Lessons learned from transferring software products to India2012In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 24, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization has influenced the way software is developed today, and many software organizations have started to actively utilize resources from around the world. However, these endeavors are recognized as very challenging, and they have attracted a lot of attention in software research in the past decade. Unlike many other research initiatives, which explore the complexities of distributed software development activities, the focus of this paper is on software transfers. Software transfers refer to activities that are moved from one location to another. The authors draw attention to the lessons learned from an empirical investigation of two transfer projects conducted at Ericsson. Both transfers were performed between a site in Sweden and a site in India. The observations outline a set of generic practices that have been found useful for transferring software development within a company. It also highlights a number of challenges to be addressed and a set of corresponding recommendations. Finally, the paper emphasizes the need to identify software products that are suitable for transfers and the need to monitor the long-term effects of transfer.

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