Change search
Refine search result
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Johan
    SAAB AB, SWE.
    Ivarsson, Henrik
    SAAB AB, SWE.
    Feldt, Robert
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Replicating Rare Software Failures with Exploratory Visual GUI Testing2017In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 53-59, article id 8048660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saab AB developed software that had a defect that manifested itself only after months of continuous system use. After years of customer failure reports, the defect still persisted, until Saab developed failure replication based on visual GUI testing. © 1984-2012 IEEE.

  • 2.
    Britto, Ricardo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Damm, Lars-Ola
    Ericsson, SWE.
    Software Architects in Large-Scale Distributed Projects: An Ericsson Case Study2016In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 48-55, article id 7725230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software architects are key assets for successful development projects. However, not much research has investigated the challenges they face in large-scale distributed projects. So, researchers investigated how architects at Ericsson were organized, their roles and responsibilities, and the effort they spent guarding and governing a large-scale legacy product developed by teams at multiple locations. Despite recent trends such as microservices and agile development, Ericsson had to follow a more centralized approach to deal with the challenges of scale, distribution, and monolithic architecture of a legacy software product. So, the architectural decisions were centralized to a team of architects. The team extensively used code reviews to not only check the code's state but also reveal defects that could turn into maintainability problems. The study results also suggest that the effort architects spend designing architecture, guarding its integrity and evolvability, and mentoring development teams is directly related to team maturity. In addition, significant investment is needed whenever new teams and locations are onboarded.

  • 3. Fricker, Samuel
    et al.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Byman, Carl
    Schmidle, Armin
    Handshaking with Implementation Proposals: Negotiating Requirements Understanding2010In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 72-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements engineering focuses on good specification practices but has yet to find working solutions for effective requirements communication. Inadequate communication and tacit assent to a demanding customer's requests make it hard to fully understand a project's requirements. A negotiation process, called handshaking with implementation proposals, has been used to communicate requirements effectively—even in situations where almost no written requirements exist and where distance separates the customer from developers. Handshaking is an efficient, flexible technique that uses architectural options to understand requirements, to make implementation decisions that create value, and to establish the foundation for a stable project. This article describes the communication challenges, solutions, and lessons learned in developing the handshaking process and applying it in industrial practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Garousi, Vahid
    et al.
    University Belfast, GBR.
    Cutting, David
    University Belfast, GBR.
    Felderer, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    What users think of COVID-19 contact-tracing apps: An analysis of eight European apps2022In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 64 countries and regions have, so far, developed COVID-19 contact-tracing apps to limit the spread of coronavirus. However, many experts and scientists cast doubt on the effectiveness of those apps. For each app, between a few hundred to a few thousand reviews have been entered by end-users in app stores. In this paper, we mine insights from the user reviews of contact-tracing apps of eight European countries to find out what end users think of COVID contact-tracing apps and the main problems that users have reported. IEEE

  • 5.
    Garousi, Vahid
    et al.
    Wageningen University, NLD.
    Giray, Görkem
    Kokteyl A, , TUR.
    Tuzun, Eray
    Bilkent Üniversitesi, TUR.
    Catal, Cagatay
    Wageningen University, NLD.
    Felderer, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Closing the Gap Between Software Engineering Education and Industrial Needs2020In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 68-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to different reports, many recent software engineering graduates often face difficulties when beginning their professional careers, due to misalignment of the skills learnt in their university education with what is needed in industry. To address that need, many studies have been conducted to align software engineering education with industry needs. To synthesize that body of knowledge, we present in this paper a systematic literature review (SLR) which summarizes the findings of 33 studies in this area. By doing a meta-analysis of all those studies and using data from 12 countries and over 4,000 data points, this study will enable educators and hiring managers to adapt their education / hiring efforts to best prepare the software engineering workforce. IEEE

  • 6.
    Garousi, Vahid
    et al.
    Wageningen Univ, NLD.
    Kucuk, Baris
    Proven Informat Technol, TUR.
    Felderer, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    What We Know About Smells in Software Test Code2019In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Test smells are poorly designed tests and negatively affect the quality of test suites and production code. We present the largest catalog of test smells, along with a summary of guidelines, techniques, and tools used to deal with test smells.

  • 7. Giardino, Carmine
    et al.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Paternoster, Nicolo
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Pekka
    VOICE OF EVIDENCE What Do We Know about Software Development in Startups?2014In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 28-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Giardino, Carmine
    et al.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Paternoster, Nicoló
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Pekka
    What do we know about software development in startups?2014In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 28-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An impressive number of new startups are launched every day as a result of growing new markets, accessible technologies, and venture capital. New ventures such as Facebook, Supercell, Linkedin, Spotify, WhatsApp, and Dropbox, to name a few, are good examples of startups that evolved into successful businesses. However, despite many successful stories, the great majority of them fail prematurely. Operating in a chaotic and rapidly evolving domain conveys new uncharted challenges for startuppers. In this study, the authors characterize their context and identify common software development startup practices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9. Gorschek, Tony
    et al.
    Fricker, Samuel
    Palm, Kenneth
    Kunsman, Steven
    A Lightweight Innovation Process for Software-Intensive Product Development2010In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product development environment facing most companies today requires a long-term perspective featuring the conception and development of long-term innovations. This can be hard when close quarter bottom-line results dominate. Without innovation, competitive advantages decrease over time. This is especially true for companies producing software-intensive systems. Software is becoming a large part of the competitive advantage of traditionally hardware-focused systems such as cars, robots, or power systems, where feature sets traditionally offered and controlled by hardware are transferred to software. As software's impact and influence grows, so do the possibilities for innovation and increasing the competitive advantage through software. Star Search is a lightweight innovation model based on best practices from innovation management literature as well as two industry cases. It employs face-to-face screening and idea refinement using heterogeneous audition teams. Star Search was developed in collaboration with, and subsequently piloted at, two companies. It has helped increase the long-term perspective of product development by increasing the level of new ideas that make it to product planning and development

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 10. Gorschek, Tony
    et al.
    Garre, Per
    Larsson, Stig
    Wohlin, Claes
    A Model for Technology Transfer in Practice2006In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 88-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology transfer, and thus industry-relevant research, involves more than merely producing research results and delivering them in publications and technical reports. It demands close cooperation and collaboration between industry and academia throughout the entire research process. During research conducted in a partnership between Blekinge Institute of Technology and two companies, Danaher Motion Saro AB (DHR) and ABB, we devised a technology transfer model that embodies this philosophy. We initiated this partnership to conduct industry-relevant research in requirements engineering and product management. Technology transfer in this context is a prerequisite: it validates academic research results in a real setting, and it provides a way to improve industry development and business processes

  • 11.
    Grossmann, Juergen
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Inst Open Commun Syst, DEU.
    Felderer, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Viehmann, Johannes
    Fraunhofer Inst Open Commun Syst, DEU.
    Schieferdecker, Ina
    Fraunhofer Inst Open Commun Syst, DEU.
    A Taxonomy to Assess and Tailor Risk-Based Testing in Recent Testing Standards2020In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a taxonomy for risk-based testing that serves as a tool to define, tailor, or assess such approaches. In this setting, the taxonomy is used to systematically identify deviations between the requirements from public standards and the individual testing approaches.

  • 12.
    Hehn, Jennifer
    et al.
    University of St. Gallen, CHF.
    Mendez, Daniel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Uebernickel, Falk
    Hasso Plattner Institute, DEU.
    Brenner, Walter
    Universität St. Gallen, CHF.
    Broy, Manfred
    Technical University of Munich, DEU.
    On Integrating Design Thinking for a Human-Centered Requirements Engineering2020In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper, we elaborate on the possibilities and needs to integrate Design Thinking into Requirements Engineering. We draw from our research and project experiences to compare what is understood as Design Thinking and Requirements Engineering considering their involved artifacts. We suggest three approaches for tailoring and integrating Design Thinking and Requirements Engineering with complementary synergies and point at open challenges for research and practice. IEEE

  • 13.
    Klotins, Eriks
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wilson, Magnus
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Continuous Software Engineering: Introducing an Industry Readiness Model2023In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software is becoming essential for most products, manufacturing processes, and back-office functions. The speed of delivering new features and refining the product is critical to remaining competitive. Software organizations may adopt continuous engineering practices to become more efficient. However, retrofitting an organization with a pipeline is challenging. Importantly, the most significant challenges and opportunities, are related to, but stem from outside the engineering realm and require rethinking customer relationships and business models. This paper presents a hierarchy of continuous engineering benefits and challenges. It is aimed to guide the adoption of continuous practices in an organization to determine the current and target level of adoption, given organizational context, ambitions, and domain constraints. IEEE

  • 14.
    Klotins, Eriks
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Software Engineering Anti-Patterns in Start-Ups2019In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 118-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software start-up failures are often explained with a poor business model, market issues, insufficient funding, or simply a bad product idea. However, inadequacies in software engineering are relatively unexplored and could be a significant contributing factor to the high start-up failure rate. In this paper we present the analysis of 88 start-up experience reports, revealing three anti-patterns associated with start-up progression phases. The anti-patterns address challenges of releasing the first version of the product, attracting customers, and expanding the product into new markets. The anti-patterns show that challenges and failure scenarios that appear to be business or market related are, at least partially, rooted in engineering inadequacies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Klotins, Eriks
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Software-intensive product engineering in start-ups: a taxonomy2018In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software start-ups are new companies aiming to launch an innovative product to mass markets fast with minimal resources. However a majority of start-ups fail before realizing their potential. Poor software engineering, among other factors, could be a significant contributor to the challenges experienced by start-ups.

    Very little is known about the engineering context in start-up companies. On the surface, start-ups are characterized by uncertainty, high risk and minimal resources. However, such characterization is not granular enough to support identification of specific engineering challenges and to devise start-up specific engineering practices.

    The first step towards understanding on software engineering in start-ups is definition of the Start-up Context Map - a taxonomy of engineering practices, environment factors and goals influencing the engineering process. Goal of the Start-up Context Map is to support further research on the field and to serve as an engineering decision support tool for start-ups. 

  • 16.
    Martins, Luiz Eduardo G.
    et al.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, BRA.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    AN AGENDA FOR THE COMING YEARS2017In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 56-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Martins, Luiz Eduardo Galvão
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, BRA.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Requirements Engineering for Safety-Critical Systems: Overview and Challenges2017In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 49-57, article id 7974683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world that depends increasingly on complex, critical, and intertwined systems, requirements engineering is crucial to developing and maintaining safety-critical systems (SCSs). Researchers studied the state of the art (through the literature) and the state of the practice (through in-depth interviews with practitioners) to discover what approaches are available for capturing, specifying, and communicating safety requirements throughout the SCS lifecycle and to determine the remaining challenges. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 18.
    Moe, Nils Brede
    et al.
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Stray, Viktoria
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering. SINTEF, Norway.
    Mikalsen, Marius
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Attractive Workplaces: What Are Engineers Looking for?2023In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competing for talents requires a conscious effort to offer an attractive workplace, which, until recently, involved increasing employee empowerment and engagement and offering opportunities for bottom-up innovation. Today, this is not sufficient, pushing tech companies to harmonize existing strategies with remote work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    et al.
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, USA.
    Duboc, Leticia
    La Salle Univ Ramon Llull, ESP.
    Venters, Colin C.
    Univ Huddersfield, GBR.
    Betz, Stefanie
    Furtwangen Univ, DEU.
    Seyff, Norbert
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CHE.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering. Blekinge Inst Technol, Software Engn Res Grp, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Chitchyan, Ruzanna
    Univ Bristol, GBR.
    Easterbrook, Steve M.
    Univ Toronto, CAN.
    Becker, Christoph
    Univ Toronto, CAN.
    Software Engineering for Sustainability Find the Leverage Points!2018In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Tkalich, Anastasiia
    et al.
    SINTEF, NOR.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Andersen, Nina Haugland
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NOR.
    Moe, Nils Brede
    SINTEF, NOR.
    What Happens to Psychological Safety When Going Remote?2024In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological safety is a precondition for learning and success in software teams. But what happens to psychological safety when work becomes remote? In this article, we explore how Norwegian software developers experienced remote work under the pandemic and after restrictions were waved and describe simple behaviors and attitudes related to psychological safety. We pay special attention to work arrangements in which team members alternate days in the office with days working remotely. Our key takeaway is that psychological safety is enabled by spontaneous interaction, which is easy to facilitate in the office and hard to facilitate remotely. Our findings lead us to recommend that team members align their work modes to increase chances for spontaneous interaction in the office while benefiting from the increased focus associated with working remotely. Author

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Tuzun, Eray
    et al.
    Bilkent University, TUR.
    Erdogmus, Hakan
    Carnegie Mellon University, USA.
    Baldassarre, Maria Teresa
    University of Bari, ITA.
    Felderer, Michael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Feldt, Robert
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Turhan, Burak
    University of Oulu, AUS.
    Ground-Truth Deficiencies in Software Engineering: When Codifying the Past Can Be Counterproductive2022In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In software engineering, the objective function of human decision makers might be influenced by many factors. Relying on historical data as the ground truth may give rise to systems that automate software engineering decisions by mimicking past suboptimal behavior. We describe the problem and offer some strategies. ©IEEE.

  • 22.
    Unterkalmsteiner, Michael
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Process Improvement Archaeology: What led us here and what’s next?2018In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While in every organization corporate culture and history change over time, intentional efforts to identifyperformance problems are of particular interest when trying to understand the current state of an organization.The results of past improvement initiatives can shed light on the evolution of an organization, and represent,with the advantage of perfect hindsight, a learning opportunity for future process improvements. Weencountered the opportunity to test this premise in an applied research collaboration with the SwedishTransport Administration (STA), the government agency responsible for the planning, implementation andmaintenance of long-term rail, road, shipping and aviation infrastructure in Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Usman, Muhammad
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Badampudi, Deepika
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Smith, Chris
    Ericsson AB, SWE.
    Nayak, Himansu
    Ericsson AB, SWE.
    An Ecosystem for the Large-Scale Reuse of Microservices in a Cloud-Native Context2022In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 68-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an ecosystem that Ericsson developed to systematically practice large-scale reuse of microservices in a cloud-native context. We discuss how various ecosystem aspects, such as its continuous delivery mechanism, marketplace, and automated checking of design rules, facilitated the development and reuse of microservices across Ericsson. We also share lessons learned while developing the ecosystem including the initiatives related to the adoption of InnerSource practices for sustaining the ecosystem. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24. Wohlin, Claes
    The infamous ratio measure [1]2010In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 27, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Wohlin, Claes
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Aurum, Aybueke
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Angelis, Lefteris
    Phillips, Laura
    Dittrich, Yvonne
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Grahn, Håkan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Henningsson, Kennet
    Kågström, Simon
    Low, Graham
    The Success Factors Powering Industry-Academia Collaboration2012In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Calefato, Fabio
    Wohlin, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Cost Savings in Global Software Engineering Where's the Evidence?2015In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 26-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Christensen, Emily Laue
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tell, Paolo
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Russo, Daniel
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    The Future Workplace: Characterizing the Spectrum of Hybrid Work Arrangements for Software Teams2023In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The better-than-expected forced working from home (WFH) experiences coupled with investments enabling remote work during the pandemic motivated many employees to continue WFH occasionally, often, or entirely. Many organizations adjust their policies to increase flexibility as reported in numerous news outlets, articles, blogs, and channels dedicated to future workplace. The studies praise the flexibility given to individuals and the increase in the work-life balance but also warn about the alienation of staff members, decreased team cohesion and sense of belonging, as well as dilution of the corporate culture. This article systemizes a spectrum of emerging work arrangements for teams, including hybrid teams, partially aligned teams and, more importantly, variegated teams with fully aligned alternation of office presence. Our team typology is based on the practical insights from ‘Alpha,’ ‘InterSoft,’ Valtech, IBM, Brandwatch, and Ericsson and provides a nuanced vocabulary for organizations to start reasoning about the future work arrangements. IEEE

  • 28.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Kuhrmann, Marco
    Keil, Patrick
    Virtual Teams: Guest Editor’s Introduction2014In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 41-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Moe, Nils Brede
    SINTEF, Trondheim, NOR.
    Levinta, Georgiana
    Spotify, SWE.
    Floryan, Marcin
    Spotify, SWE.
    Spotify Guilds: How to Succeed With Knowledge Sharing in Large-Scale Agile Organizations2019In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 51-57, article id 8648260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new generation of software companies has revolutionized the way companies are designed. While bottom-up governance and team autonomy improve motivation, performance, and innovation, managing agile development at scale is a challenge. We describe how Spotify cultivates guilds to help the company share knowledge, align, and make collective decisions.

  • 30.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Solingen, Rini Van
    Delft University of Technology, NLD.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    Örebro universitet, SWE.
    The Offshoring Elephant in the Room: Turnover2020In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 54-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staffing software projects with engineers from best-cost locations has become a commonality. However, distributed development remains practically challenging with many recurring problems, such as decreased productivity, low quality, and high unforeseen extra costs. One main underlying reason for these challenges is high employee turnover, although often overlooked. In developing locations such as India turnover is significantly large due to personal benefits from ‘job-hopping’. Why is turnover such a problem? Should companies stop sourcing to countries with high turnover or are there known remedies? This research puts turnover of software engineers in India in the spotlight and derives strategies to address it. We share experiences from two industrial cases, discuss important variables for portraying the actual turnover state and its negative impacts. Furthermore, we put forward ten recommendations for actively reducing turnover itself and lowering its negative consequences. IEEE

  • 31.
    Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    van Solingen, Rini
    What's the True Hourly Cost of Offshoring?2016In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 60-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An offshore team's hourly costs took three years to become comparable with the in-house team's costs. Getting close to breaking even took five years. Learning costs due to offshore employee turnover were the primary cost factor to get under control.

  • 32. Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Wohlin, Claes
    A Whisper of Evidence in Global Software Engineering2011In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 15-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33. Šmite, Darja
    et al.
    Wohlin, Claes
    Strategies Facilitating Software Product Transfers2011In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization of software work has become common in today's market. As part of cost-reduction strategies, many product-focused software companies started shipping their product development to insourcing and outsourcing offshore locations. Unfortunately, moving software products from one site to another isn't always a good business strategy for either the organization or the product. In this article, the authors discuss findings from studying software insourcing transfers at Ericsson, a large software product development company headquartered in Sweden. Their findings suggest that certain product, personnel, and process characteristics can facilitate the execution of an offshore insourcing transfer. On the basis of research conducted together with the company, they share a list of critical factors alleviating transfer difficulties and seven strategies facilitating transition of software work across sites.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf