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  • 1.
    Anderberg, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Abrahamsson, Linda
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Older People's Use and Nonuse of the Internet in Sweden2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 23, article id 9050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of the internet has considerably increased over recent years, and the importance of internet use has also grown as services have gone online. Sweden is largely an information society like other countries with high reported use amongst European countries. In line with digitalization development, society is also changing, and many activities and services today take place on the internet. This development could potentially lead to those older persons who do not use the internet or do not follow the development of services on the internet finding it difficult to take part in information and activities that no longer occur in the physical world. This has led to a digital divide between groups, where the older generations (60+), in particular, have been affected. In a large study of Sweden's adult population in 2019, 95 percent of the overall population was said to be internet users, and the corresponding number for users over 66 years of age was 84%. This study shows that the numbers reported about older peoples' internet use, most likely, are vastly overestimated and that real use is significantly lower, especially among the oldest age groups. We report that 62.4% of the study subjects are internet users and that this number most likely also is an overestimation. When looking at nonresponders to the questionnaire, we find that they display characteristics generally attributed to non-use, such as lower education, lower household economy, and lower cognitive functioning.

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    Older People's Use and Nonuse of the Internet in Sweden
  • 2.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Dellkvist, Helen
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Johansson, Ulrika Bernow
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Karlskrona Municipal, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care: An interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care. Design An explorative descriptive qualitative design was used. Methods The data were collected using semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of eight relatives and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Results Results show that creating and sharing the life story of a close family member could help relatives handle grief and stress. It was perceived as an important, yet difficult, task to ensure that the close family member got good quality care. The creation of a meaningful life story takes time and requires cooperation with family members and other significant people.

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  • 3.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Younger persons' and their next of kin's experiences of cardiac care during the first year following a myocardial infarction2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no S1, p. S37-S38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Hjelm, Markus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Care experiences of younger people and next of kin following myocardial infarction2020In: British Journal of Cardiac Nursing, ISSN 1749-6403, E-ISSN 2052-2207, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims Coronary heart diseases, including myocardial infarction, remain a major health problem worldwide. Little is known about the cardiac care experiences post myocardial infarction of younger people and their next of kin. This study aimed to describe the cardiac care experiences of post-myocardial infarction younger people (<55 years old) and their next of kin. Method This study employed an exploratory inductive qualitative design involving individual interviews with younger people (n=17) and their next of kin (n=13). Results Three categories were identified and patients were deemed to be in need of: tailored information, recognition or a post-discharge rehabilitation plan Conclusions Findings demonstrated the importance of using the experiences of younger people and their next of kin as the starting point when planning care and cardiac rehabilitation. Health professionals must systematically and purposefully provide person-centred care, both in hospital and post-discharge settings. Next of kin must be regarded as an important resource in post-myocardial infarction care for younger people, as they tend to be engaged in providing their relatives with support, which is valuable for the recovery of young people post myocardial infarction. Further research is warranted to investigate what makes person-centred interventions directed towards post-myocardial infarction younger people and their next of kin effective.

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  • 5.
    Axén, Anna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Taube, Elin
    Malmö University.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Loneliness in Relation to Social Factors and Self-Reported Health Among Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, ISSN 2150-1319, E-ISSN 2150-1327, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Loneliness is described as a public health problem and can be both a consequence of aging and a cause of ill health. Lonely older adults tend to have difficulties making new social connections, essential in reducing loneliness. Loneliness often varies over time, but established loneliness tends to persist. Maintaining good health is fundamental throughout the life course. Social connections change with aging, which can contribute to loneliness. AIM: This study aimed to investigate loneliness in relation to social factors and self-reported health among older adults. METHOD: A cross-sectional research design was used based on data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, Blekinge (SNAC-B), from February 2019 to April 2021. Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive and inferential analysis. RESULTS: Of n = 394 participants, 31.7% (n = 125) stated loneliness. Close emotional connections were necessary for less loneliness. Loneliness was more common among those who did not live with their spouse or partner and met more rarely. Furthermore, seeing grandchildren and neighbors less often increased loneliness, and a more extensive social network decreased loneliness. CONCLUSION: This study underlined the importance of social connections and having someone to share a close, emotional connection with to reduce loneliness.

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  • 6.
    Christel, Borg
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Tell, Johanna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Olsson, Anki
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Forsbrand, Malin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Problem-based learning with digitals tools in the nursing programme during the Covid-19 pandemic2022In: Högre Utbildning, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the spring 2019, the prerequisites for conducting education were changed due to the pandemic. For higher education in Sweden almost all education switches on to digital education. Nursing education has focus on both theoretical and practical courses, which is a challenge for digital or distance education. Furthermore, the nursing programme at the studied university used problem-based learning (PBL), with base-groups at campus. Instead of physical meetings at campus, the base-groups took part with digital tools. The impact of base-groupsmeeting with digital tools are important to reflect on, especially since the education and learning of future probably will be more hybrid. © 2022 Christel Borg, Johanna Tell, Terese Lindberg, Lina Nilsson, Anki Olsson, Malin Forsbrand & Lisa Skär.

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  • 7.
    Christiansen, Line
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Using Mobile Health and the Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life: Perceptions of Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 8, article id 2650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital health technologies such as mobile health (mHealth) are considered to have the potential to support the needs of older adults with cognitive impairment. However, the evidence for improving health with the use of mHealth applications is of limited quality. Few studies have reported on the consequences of technology use concerning the older adults' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of mHealth and its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among older adults with cognitive impairment. The study was conducted using a qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach. A total of 18 older participants with cognitive impairment were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed in order to apply phenomenography in a home-care context. The results showed variations in the older adults' perceptions that were comprised within three categories of description; Require technology literacy, Maintain social interaction, and Facilitate independent living. In conclusion, the development and design of mHealth technologies need to be tailored based on older adults´ needs in order to be understood and perceived as useful in a home-care context. For mHealth to support HRQoL, healthcare should be provided in a way that encourages various forms of communication and interaction.

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    Using Mobile Health and the Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life: Perceptions of Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment
  • 8.
    Christiansen, Line
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Univ Skovde, Skovde, Sweden..
    Cellek, Selim
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, GBR.
    Zhang, Jufen
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, GBR.
    Lemmens, Evi
    Univ Coll Leuven Limburg, BEL.
    Garolera, Maite
    Consorci Sanitari Terrassa, Brain Cognit & Behav Clin ReBarcelona, ESP.
    Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin
    Reg Univ Hosp Malaga, ESP.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Associations Between Mobile Health Technology use and Self-rated Quality of Life: A Cross-sectional Study on Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment2021In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is affected even at early stages in older adults with cognitive impairment. The use of mobile health (mHealth) technology can offer support in daily life and improve the physical and mental health of older adults. However, a clarification of how mHealth technology can be used to support the QoL of older adults with cognitive impairment is needed. Objective: To investigate factors affecting mHealth technology use in relation to self-rated QoL among older adults with cognitive impairment. Methods: A cross-sectional research design was used to analyse mHealth technology use and QoL in 1,082 older participants. Baseline data were used from a multi-centered randomized controlled trial including QoL, measured by the Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease (QoL-AD) Scale, as the outcome variable. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: Having moderately or high technical skills in using mHealth technology and using the internet via mHealth technology on a daily or weekly basis was associated with good to excellent QoL in older adults with cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The variation in technical skills and internet use among the participants can be interpreted as an obstacle for mHealth technology to support QoL.

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    Associations Between Mobile Health Technology use and Self-rated Quality of Life
  • 9.
    Christiansen, Line
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Health-related quality of life and related factors among a sample of older people with cognitive impairment2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 849-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aimed to identify factors affecting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of older adults with cognitive impairment and to describe the association of these factors with different components of HRQoL. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Methods: Data were collected from 247 individuals aged 60 years and older from a Swedish longitudinal cohort study. The Short-Form Health Survey-12 (SF-12) and EuroQol (EQ-5D) were used to assess HRQoL. The data were analysed using descriptive and comparative statistics. Results: The present study identified several factors that influenced HRQoL of older adults with cognitive impairment. The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with physical and mental HRQoL: dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), receiving informal care and feelings of loneliness and pain. © 2019 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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  • 10.
    Eivazzadeh, Shahryar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Ethical Challenges of Evaluating Health Information SystemsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Evaluating and researching health information systems are interventions of their kind and might lead to ethical complexities and challenges. Most of those challenges are inherited from the more general fields of research and evaluation, health studies, and information systems studies. Beyond those challenges, this field has its particular traits, regarding the involved stakeholders, required values or qualities, or the process which can raise field-specific or context-specific ethical challenges.

    Objectives

    This paper reports and discusses some of the challenges of evaluating and researching health information systems by taking a systematic approach in finding, postulating, and analyzing them.

    Method

    Through a scoping review, a set of ethical challenges, regarding the evaluation and research of health information systems, were extracted. From the same set of articles, the acting entities, including stakeholders and artefacts, were identified. From a sample of seven cases of health information systems, a set of demanded impact qualities were extracted. From the literature, the evaluation stages were elicited. The acting entities, required qualities, and the evaluation stages were combined to create a three-dimensional space. The space contained the ethical challenges extracted from the scoping review and helped to postulate more items.

    Results

    The final list of identified items contains 20 possible ethical challenges that can be caused or raised by evaluating or researching health information systems and technologies. The ethical challenges are discussed, based on their probable stage of occurrence. The three-dimensional space and the method of populating it is proposed as an effective method in similar cases of discovering ethical challenges.

    Conclusion

    Evaluating or researching health information systems can raise ethical challenges, that we have identified 20 of them in this article. All the challenges were discussed, such as the actual value of evaluation, breach of privacy, risks for safety, problems with usability and accessibility, conflict of interests, problems with the informed consent, and miscommunication. The novel approach for elicitation of the ethical challenges introduced in this article might be applied in other similar studies.

  • 11.
    Enlof, Per
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
    Romare, Charlotte
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Jildenstal, Pether
    Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
    Ringdal, Mona
    Univ Gothenburg, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Smart Glasses for Anesthesia Care: Initial Focus Group Interviews with Specialized Health Care Professionals2021In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Smart glasses are a kind of wearable technology that gives users sustained, hands-free access to data and can transmit and receive information wirelessly. Earlier studies have suggested that smart glasses have the potential to improve patient safety in anesthesia care. Research regarding health care professionals' views of the potential use of smart glasses in anesthesia care is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe anesthesia health care professionals' views of smart glasses before clinical use. Design: A qualitative descriptive study. Methods: Data were collected from focus group interviews and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Findings: Three categories of participants' views of smart glasses were created during the analysis: views of integrating smart glasses in clinical setting; views of customized functionality of smart glasses; and views of being a user of smart glasses. One theme, striving for situational control, was identified in the analysis. Conclusions: Smart glasses were seen as a tool that can impact and improve access to patient-related information, and aid health care professionals in their struggle to gain situational control during anesthesia care. These are factors related to increased patient safety. (c) 2020 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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  • 12.
    Holst, Adelheid
    et al.
    Faculty of Professional Studies Nord University Bodø, NOR.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Formal caregivers' experiences of aggressive behaviour in older people living with dementia in nursing homes: A systematic review2017In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e12158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate formal caregivers' experiences of aggressive behaviour in older people living with dementia in nursing homes. Background: Aggressive behaviour symptoms among older people living with dementia are reported to be prevalent. As aggressive behaviour includes both verbal and physical behaviours, such as kicking, hitting and screaming, it causes an increased burden on formal caregivers. Professionals experiencing this aggression perceived it as challenging, causing physical and psychological damage, leading to anger, stress and depression. Methods: A systematic review was conducted. A search of published research studies between 2000 and 2015 was conducted using appropriate search terms. Eleven studies were identified and included in this review. Results: The analysis resulted in four categories: formal caregivers' views on triggers of aggression, expressions of aggression, the effect of aggressive behaviours on formal caregivers and formal caregivers' strategies to address aggression. The results show that aggressive behaviour may lead to negative feelings in formal caregivers and nursing home residents. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that having the ability to identify triggers possibly assists caregivers with addressing aggressive behaviour. Aggressive behaviour might also affect quality of care. Implications for practice: Results from this systematic review indicate that caregivers prefer person-centred strategies to handle aggressive behaviour among older people, while the use of pharmaceuticals and coercion strategies is a last resort. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 13. Juuso, Päivi
    et al.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sundin, Karin
    Söderberg, Siv
    The Workplace Experiences of Women with Fibromyalgia2016In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common pain syndrome that mostly affects women. Chronic pain and other symptoms often chalenge work for women with FM. This study aimed to explore how women with FM experience their work situations. Method: A purposive sample of 15 women with FM was interviewed with in-depth qualitative interviews. Data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach. Results: The results revealed that women with FM experienced incapacity to work as they had previously and eventually accepted that their work life had changed or reached its end. Since their work had great significance in their lives, feelings of loss and sorrow were common. Women who were working, unemployed, or on sick leave described feelings of fear for their future work situations. Conclusions: Women with FM greatly value their work. Their wish to perform work as before is however, not consistent with their abilities. As such, women with FM need support in continuing to work for as long as possible, after which they need support in finding new values in life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 14.
    Juuso, Päivi
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, SWE.
    Recovery despite everyday pain: Women's experiences of living with whiplash-associated disorder2020In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Living with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) means living every day under the influence of pain and limitations. As the incidence of WAD and the related intensity of pain are somewhat higher among women than men, the aim of the present study was to describe women's experiences of living with WAD. Methods: A purposive sample of seven women participated in individual in-depth qualitative interviews, the transcripts of which were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results: The results of the analysis suggested six themes of women's experiences with WAD: living with unpredictable pain; trying to manage the pain; living with limitations; being unable to work as before; needing support and understanding; and learning to live with limitations. The findings showed that unpredictable pain limited women's strength to engage in activities of daily life and be as active as before. Support and understanding were important for their ability to manage changes in their daily lives. Conclusions: Pain considerably affects the daily lives of women with WAD, particularly by limiting their ability to perform activities and to enjoy their professional and social lives. As women with WAD need support with managing their daily lives, nurses and other healthcare personnel should adopt a person-centred approach, in order to support such women according to their individual needs and circumstances. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 15.
    Lindberg, Terese
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sandström, Boel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Christel, Borg
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Hjelm, Markus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Olsson, Anki
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Older persons' experience of eHealth services in home health care: A meta-ethnography eHealth services in home health care2021In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe older persons' experiences of eHealth services in home health care. A meta-ethnographic approach was applied, and a systematic literature search was conducted in three databases. In total, 11 articles were included and analysed, which resulted in two themes and six sub-themes. The results show that for older persons to use the eHealth services, they must provide some additional value compared to current contacts with healthcare professionals. Those with regular healthcare contact do not experience the eHealth service as adding anything to the care they already receive. The introduction of eHealth services involves learning how to use the new technology, and some older persons experience the technology as motivating and inspiring. The eHealth service makes some feel safer while some do not trust the technology. In order to make the best use of eHealth services, it is important that the services are adjusted not only to each person's needs but also to their personal capabilities and resources, while the older person must feel valued as an active partner in the care process. Thus, when using eHealth services, the older person's perspective needs to be given priority and decisions should not only be based on organizational considerations.

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  • 16.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Instsutionen för Hälsovetenskap.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mittuniversitetet, Instítutionen för omvårdnad.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood: Parenting young adults with mental illness2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of young adults with mental illness may face a continued demand for support, even though their children have reached the age of majority. The aim of this study was to explore relatives experiences of parenting a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood. Individual interviews were conducted and analysed according to Grounded Theory. The results showed that relatives experienced powerlessness and a sense of inescapable duty with limited possibilities to be relieved. With a family nursing approach, relatives can be supported and, when the young adults needs of care are met, they can be relieved from their burden of responsibility.

  • 17.
    Mikaelsson Midlöv, Elina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Relative's suggestions for improvements in support from health professionals before and after a patient's death in general palliative care at home: A qualitative register study2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The efforts of relatives in providing palliative care (PC) at home are important. Relatives take great responsibility, face many challenges and are at increased risk of poor physical and mental health. Support for these relatives is important, but they often do not receive the support they need. When PC is provided at home, the support for relatives before and after a patient's death must be improved. This study aimed to describe relatives' suggestions to improve the support from health professionals (HPs) before and after a patient's death in general PC at home. Methods: This study had a qualitative descriptive design based on the data from open-ended questions in a survey collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The respondents were adult relatives involved in general PC at home across Sweden. The textual data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The analysis identified four themes: (1) seeking increased access to HPs, (2) needing enhanced information, (3) desiring improved communication and (4) requesting individual support. Conclusions: It is important to understand and address how the support to relatives may be improved to reduce the unmet needs of relatives. The findings of this study offer some concrete suggestions for improvement on ways to support relatives. Further research should focus on tailored support interventions so that HPs can provide optimal support for relatives before and after a patient's death when PC is provided at home. © 2024 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

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  • 18.
    Mikaelsson Midlöv, Elina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sterner, Therese
    Malmö university.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Support given by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general palliative care at home in Sweden: Findings from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care2023In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. General palliative care (PC) is provided more at home, leading to increased involvement of relatives. Although support for relatives is a fundamental component of PC, there are deficiencies in the support provided to relatives when general PC is provided at home. This study aimed to describe the support provided by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general PC at home.

    Methods. A cross-sectional register study was implemented, with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative care. The sample consisted of 160 completed surveys from relatives who had been involved in general PC at home, with 160 related surveys answered by health professionals. Only the questions about support to relatives were used from the surveys.

    Results. The findings showed that although many relatives appear to receive support in general PC at home, not all relatives receive optimal support before or after a patient's death. The findings also indicated differences in whether relatives received some support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative. There were also differences in responses between health professionals and relatives regarding if relatives received counseling from a doctor about whether the patient was dying.

    Significance of results. There is potential for improvements regarding support for relatives, especially after a patient's death, which has been confirmed in previous studies. The differences in whether relatives received support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative highlight the need for future research on how to support different types of relatives before and after a patient's death when general PC is provided at home.

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  • 19. Nilsson, C.
    et al.
    Lindberg, B.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, S.
    Meanings of balance for people with long-term illnesses2016In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, E-ISSN 2052-2215, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 563-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of balance in everyday life for people with long-term illnesses living at home. People living with long-term illnesses are in need of help and support to manage their daily lives. Twelve adults with extensive needs for help and support were interviewed. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the interview texts. The findings show that balance in everyday life for people with long-term illnesses means striving for independence through care and support in their surroundings. It was also important to be able to choose how their lives would be and to be with others who listened and understood them for who they are. By building a relationship with patients at an early stage of their illnesses, nursing staff have an opportunity to understand what people who are living at home with long-term illnesses need in order to achieve balance in their everyday lives.

  • 20.
    Nygren Zotterman, Anna
    et al.
    Lulea Univ Technol, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Olsson, Malin
    Lulea Univ Technol, SWE.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden Univ, SWE.
    Being in togetherness: Meanings of encounters within primary healtcare setting for patients living with long-term illness2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 19-20, p. 2854-2862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of encounters for patients with long-term illness within the primary healthcare setting. Background: Good encounters can be crucial for patients in terms of how they view their quality of care. Therefore, it is important to understand meanings of interactions between patients and healthcare personnel. Design: A phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to analyse the interviews. Methods: Narrative interviews with ten patients with long-term illness were performed, with a focus on their encounters with healthcare personnel within the primary healthcare setting. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach was used to interpret the interview texts. Results: The results demonstrated that patients felt well when they were seen as an important person and felt welcomed by healthcare personnel. Information and follow-ups regarding the need for care were essential. Continuity with the healthcare personnel was one way to establish a relationship, which contributed to patients’ feelings of being seen and understood. Good encounters were important for patients’ feelings of health and well-being. Being met with mistrust, ignorance and nonchalance had negative effects on patients’ perceived health and well-being and led to feelings of lower confidence regarding the care received. Conclusions: Patients described a great need to be confirmed and met with respect by healthcare personnel, which contributed to their sense of togetherness. Having a sense of togetherness strengthened patient well-being. Relevance to clinical practice: By listening and responding to patients’ needs and engaging in meetings with patients in a respectful manner, healthcare personnel can empower patients’ feelings of health and well-being. Healthcare personnel need to be aware of the significance of these actions because they can make patients experience feelings of togetherness, even if patients meet with different care personnel at each visit. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 21.
    Nygren Zotterman, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University.
    Dignity encounters: the experiences of people with long-term illnesses and their close relatives within a primary healthcare setting2022In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 23, article id e72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the experiences of dignity encounters from the perspective of people with long-term illness and their close relatives within a primary healthcare setting. BACKGROUND: The importance of dignity as a concept in nursing care is well known, and in every healthcare encounter, the patient's dignity has to be protected. METHODS: A purposive sample of 10 people (5 couples) participated in this qualitative descripted study. One person in each of the couples had a long-term illness. Conjoint interviews were conducted and analyzed with an inductive qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in three themes: i) Being supported by an encouraging contact; ii) Being listen to and understood; and iii) Being met with respect. Couples described being encountered with dignity as having accessibility to care in terms of being welcomed with their needs and receiving help. Accessibility promoted beneficial contact with healthcare personnel, who empowered the couples with guidance and support. Couples described a dignity encounter when healthcare personnel confirmed them as valuable and important persons. A dignity encounter was promoted their sense of feeling satisfied with the care they received and promoted safe care. Treated with dignity had a positive impact on the couples' health and well-being and enhanced their sense of a good impression of the healthcare personnel within the primary health care. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare personnel must regard and consider people with long-term illnesses and their close relatives' experiences of dignity encounters to gain an understanding that enables them to support their needs and to know that the care is directed toward them.

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  • 22.
    Nygren Zotterman, Anna
    et al.
    Lulea tekniska Universitet, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, SWE.
    Meanings of encounters for close relatives of people with a long-term illness within a primary healthcare setting2018In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 392-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Encounters play an important role in the relationship between healthcare personnel and the close relatives of people with a long-term illness. Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate the meanings of encounters for close relatives of people with a long-term illness within a primary healthcare setting. Methods: Interviews using a narrative approach were conducted with seven women and three men, and the phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to interpret the interview texts. Results: The structural analysis revealed three major themes: being confirmed as a family, being informed of the care, and being respected as a valuable person. Close relatives stated that they wanted to be confirmed as a family and have a familiar and trusting relationship with healthcare personnel. They valued being informed concerning the care of the ill person so that they could give support at home. It was also important to be compassionately viewed as an important person in a welcoming atmosphere based on respect and dignity. © Cambridge University Press 2018

  • 23.
    Piculell, Erik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    A concept analysis of health communication in a home environment: Perspectives of older persons and their informal caregivers2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 1006-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Health communication (HC) is a vast research field focusing on changing health behaviours, and rapidly evolving technology is creating different ways and possibilities to reach target groups and audiences. In the context of home care, a deeper understanding of HC is lacking, specifically for older persons with care needs and their informal caregivers. The aim of this concept analysis is to identify and construct the meaning of HC from the perspective of older persons in need of care in the home environment and their informal caregivers. Materials and methods This study utilised Rogers' (2000) Evolutionary Concept Analysis Method (EMCA) to create and construct a meaning of the concept of HC. The EMCA was based on a systematic literature review of scientific articles, using CINAHL, Pubmed and Inspec (2000-2017). A total of 29 articles were retrieved and analysed. Results The identified attributes of the concept were as follows: resources of the recipient, influence on decisions and advantages of tailored information. HC was described as both contributing to knowledge as well as being overwhelming where habits and resources influenced the use of information. The attributes led to the following descriptive definition of HC: 'Tailored HC, based on needs and resources of the recipient influence care decisions'. The home environment influenced HC by habits and interactions between older persons and their informal caregivers. Conclusions The home environment influenced HC in terms of social aspects of interactions and habits and between the older person and the informal caregiver. Tailored information with the use of technology contributed to knowledge in care of older persons and their informal caregivers. HC was shown to contribute to improve care for older people in their home environment.

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  • 24.
    Piculell, Erik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Using a mobile application for health communication to facilitate a sense of coherence: experiences of older persons with cognitive impairment2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 18, no 21, article id 11332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing use of technology by older persons and their preferences for living at home and being independent have created an avenue for self-care and care delivery using mobile technologies and health communication. This study aimed to explain how older persons with cognitive impairment experienced technology-based health communication through the use of a mobile application to facilitate a sense of coherence. Individual, semi-structured interviews with 16 participants in the SMART4MD project were conducted. The interviews were transcribed then coded deductively and thematically, creating themes that corresponded to the central components of the sense of coherence model: comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness. The findings produced an overall theme: a challenging technology that can provide support, based on the three identified themes: making sense of mobile technologies, mastering mobile technologies, and the potential added value to use mobile technologies. The participants’ experiences were influenced by their previous use and expectations for the application. Personal support, cognitive and physical ability, and different sources for information impacted use. The participants experienced that using the application created an ambiguity to be challenging and have possible benefits. The study suggests that the sense of coherence model may be used as a method to understand the use of technology by older populations.

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  • 25.
    Robertsen, Inger Lise
    et al.
    Nord universitet, NOR.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Oncology nurses’ experiences of meeting with men with cancer-related fatigue: a qualitative study2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 252-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer treatment often causes side effects, among which fatigue is common and can persist for years among disease-free cancer survivors. Living with fatigue can lead to reduced life expectancy and quality of life. Aims and objectives: To describe oncology nurses’ experiences of meeting with men with cancer and talking about cancer-related fatigue. Design and Methods: The data were collected via semi-structured interviews with nine oncology nurses recruited using a purposeful sampling method and analysed using thematic content analysis. This qualitative design was conducted to describe and interpret the content of experiences. Ethical issues and approval: The study was approved by a regional Ethical Review Board, and research ethical principles were followed. Results: The analysis revealed one major theme, namely take the whole person into consideration, and three subthemes: the importance of (i) establishing trust in the nurse–patient relationship, (ii) supporting the patient’s understanding of cancer-related fatigue, and (iii) managing the challenging emotions experienced by patients. The major theme describes the oncology nurses’ approach when meeting with men with cancer-related fatigue. Conclusion: The results provide insight into how oncology nurses can increase their knowledge about fatigue to establish trust in nurse–patient relationships. They can acquire knowledge about how to make men with cancer-related fatigue feel safe when handling their daily lives despite their fatigue. Oncology nurses require knowledge, presence and commitment in their interactions with men with cancer-related fatigue to be able to take the whole person into consideration. This study demonstrates the importance of the approach oncology nurses take when interacting with men with cancer-related fatigue and the strategies required when talking about cancer-related fatigue. © 2020 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science

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  • 26.
    Romare, Charlotte
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Burden of care related to monitoring patient vital signs during intensive care; a descriptive retrospective database study2022In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 71, article id 103213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe burden of care related to monitoring patient vital signs of intensive care unit patients in a Swedish hospital. Setting: Data collected by “The Swedish Intensive Care Registry” from one general category II intensive care unit in a Swedish hospital was included in this study. Data from year 2014 to 2020 was analysed comprising a total of 3617 intensive care episodes and 29,165 work shifts. Research methodology: This is a retrospective database study. Descriptive statistics gave an overview of the dataset. To test for differences between variables related to burden of care for “Documentation of monitoring” Mann Whitney U test and Kruskal Wallis test was performed using STATA. Results: “Documentation of monitoring” was reported to generate a prominent burden of care during intensive care. Nearly all patients had continuous monitoring. Comparison for burden of care related to “Documentation of monitoring” for sexes generated no statistically significant difference. Comparison for burden of care related to “Documentation of monitoring” among age groups, diagnose groups and time of day generated statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Monitoring patient vital signs was clearly present during intensive care, hence impacting intensive care nurses’ clinical practice. Further research is endorsed to improve and facilitate monitoring to keep improving patient safety. © 2022 The Authors

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  • 27.
    Romare, Charlotte
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Enlöf, Per
    University of Gothenburg Sahlgrenska academy, SWE.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Jildenstål, Pether K.
    University of Gothenburg Sahlgrenska academy, SWE.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Nurse anesthetists’ experiences using smart glasses to monitor patients’ vital signs during anesthesia care: A qualitative study2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 4 April, article id e0250122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To describe nurse anesthetists’ experiences using smart glasses to monitor patients’ vital signs during anesthesia care. Methods Data was collected through individual semi-structured interviews with seven nurse anesthetists who had used smart glasses, with a customized application for monitoring vital signs, during clinical anesthesia care. Data was analyzed using thematic content analysis. Results An overarching theme became evident during analysis; Facing and embracing responsibility. Being a nurse anesthetist entails a great responsibility, and the participants demonstrated that they shouldered this responsibility with pride. The theme was divided in two sub-themes. The first of these, A new way of working, comprised the categories Adoption and Utility. This involved incorporating smart glasses into existing routines in order to provide safe anesthesia care. The second sub-theme, Encountering side effects, consisted of the categories Obstacles and Personal affect. This sub-theme concerned the possibility to use smart glasses as intended, as well as the affect on nurse anesthetists as users. Conclusion Smart glasses improved access to vital signs and enabled continuous monitoring regardless of location. Continued development and improvement, both in terms of the application software and the hardware, are necessary for smart glasses to meet nurse anesthetists’ needs in clinical practice. Copyright: © 2021 Romare et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • 28.
    Romare, Charlotte
    et al.
    Blekinge County Council, SWE.
    Hass, Ursula
    Padme AB, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses in intensive care: A qualitative study2018In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 45, p. 66-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses before their implementation in an intensive care unit, both regarding quality of use of the glasses and to identify possible intensive care situations where the glasses could be used to increase patient safety. Methods: Data were generated through focus group interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis. Findings: The findings describe participants' views of smart glasses divided into three categories; Smart glasses to facilitate work at intensive care unit; Quality of use and Utilisation. Participants assumed smart glasses to cause both effect and affect in intensive care. Participants' concern for patients arose recurrently and through their concern intention to work to promote patient safety. Conclusion: Smart glasses are suggested as a complement to existing monitoring and routines and cannot replace human presence in intensive care. © 2017 The Authors.

  • 29.
    Romare, Charlotte
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Region Blekinge, SWE.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Smart glasses for caring situations in complex care environments: Scoping review2020In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e16055Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anesthesia departments and intensive care units represent two advanced, high-tech, and complex care environments. Health care in those environments involves different types of technology to provide safe, high-quality care. Smart glasses have previously been used in different health care settings and have been suggested to assist health care professionals in numerous areas. However, smart glasses in the complex contexts of anesthesia care and intensive care are new and innovative. An overview of existing research related to these contexts is needed before implementing smart glasses into complex care environments. Objective: The aim of this study was to highlight potential benefits and limitations with health care professionals' use of smart glasses in situations occurring in complex care environments. Methods: A scoping review with six steps was conducted to fulfill the objective. Database searches were conducted in PubMed and Scopus; original articles about health care professionals’ use of smart glasses in complex care environments and/or situations occurring in those environments were included. The searches yielded a total of 20 articles that were included in the review. Results: Three categories were created during the qualitative content analysis: (1) smart glasses as a versatile tool that offers opportunities and challenges, (2) smart glasses entail positive and negative impacts on health care professionals, and (3) smart glasses' quality of use provides facilities and leaves room for improvement. Smart glasses were found to be both a helpful tool and a hindrance in caring situations that might occur in complex care environments. This review provides an increased understanding about different situations where smart glasses might be used by health care professionals in clinical practice in anesthesia care and intensive care; however, research about smart glasses in clinical complex care environments is limited. Conclusions: Thoughtful implementation and improved hardware are needed to meet health care professionals’ needs. New technology brings challenges; more research is required to elucidate how smart glasses affect patient safety, health care professionals, and quality of care in complex care environments. ©Charlotte Romare, Lisa Skär.

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    Smart Glasses for Caring Situations in Complex Care Environments: Scoping Review
  • 30.
    Romare, Charlotte
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    The use of smart glasses in nursing education: A scoping review2023In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 73, article id 103824Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this scoping review was to give an overview of the usability and feasibility of smart glasses in nursing education. In addition, this study will highlight nursing students’ experiences of using smart glasses in learning situations. Background: Healthcare is becoming increasingly complex and technological and so is nursing education. Technology enhanced learning aims to enhance the teaching-learning process through use of technology, for example through smart glasses. Design and methods: A literature review using a scoping review methodology was conducted. Qualitative content analysis was performed to analyse data. 14 references were included in the analysis. References were found using the databases PubMed, SCOPUS and ERIC. Results: The analysis resulted in three categories; (1) Situations in which smart glasses have been used in nursing education, (2) Learning experiences from using smart glasses in nursing education, and (3) User experiences from using smart glasses in nursing education. Smart glasses were used in different learning situations and were in general positively evaluated by nursing students. Although, drawbacks of using smart glasses were noted which could negatively effect student learning. Conclusions: Smart glasses have been used in a variety of learning situations in nursing education and enabled new learning situations. Students found smart glasses beneficial for their learning and smart glasses motivated and engaged students in the learning situation. Although, this was both user- and situation dependent. Technical issues could cause students to lose focus and there is need for technical support to facilitate the learning curve. By learning from others’ experiences unnecessary drawbacks can be avoided. © 2023 The Authors

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  • 31.
    Skär, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Christel, Borg
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Thoughts on the end of life in patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A qualitative interview study2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2158-2164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to deepen the current knowledge of how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and long-term oxygen treatment think about and expect end-of-life. Design: A qualitative design was used. Methods: A purposeful sample of 19 patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was obtained from the Swedish National Registry on Respiratory Failure (Swedevox). Data was collected with semi-structured interviews and analysed using a hermeneutic approach. Results: The analysis revealed three themes: Living in the present without a future; difficulty talking about the uncertainty; and feeling anxious about leaving family behind. Participants indicated that healthcare professionals should invite them to mutual discussions as it was easier to reject an invitation if they could not talk right then, than to initiate a discussion themselves. Start of home oxygen or a deteriorating health status may be an important time to clinically address existential and end-of-life issues.

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  • 32.
    Skär, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Grankvist, Olov
    Sunderby Hospital, SWE.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, SWE.
    Factors of importance for developing a trustful patient-professional relationship when women undergo a pelvic examination2020In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 869-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined gynecological teaching women’s perception on what factors are important for developing a trustful patient-professional relationship when women undergo a pelvic examination. A qualitative research design was conducted with repeated focus group discussions. Our results show that healthcare professionals’ communications skills can strengthen a trustful patient-professional relationship. Treating women with dignity could make them feel less vulnerable and make the relationship trustworthy based on respect. Thus, having the ability to identify factors important for a trustful relationship may support healthcare professional’s ability to strengthen women’s health issues. A trustful relationship might also affect quality of care. © 2020, © 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 33.
    Skär, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden Univ, SWE.
    Patients' complaints regarding healthcare encounters and communication2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 224-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore patient-reported complaints regarding communication and healthcare encounters and how these were responded to by healthcare professionals. Design: A retrospective and descriptive design was used in a County Council in northern part of Sweden. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Methods: The content of 587 patient-reported complaints was included in the study. Descriptive statistical analysis and a deductive content analysis were used to investigate the content in the patient-reported complaints. Results: The results show that patients' dissatisfaction with encounters and communication concerned all departments in the healthcare organization. Patients were most dissatisfied when they were not met in a professional manner. There were differences between genders, where women reported more complaints regarding their dissatisfaction with encounters and communication compared with men. Many of the answers on the patient-reported complaints lack a personal apology and some of the patients failed to receive an answer to their complaints.

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  • 34.
    Skär, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden Univ, SWE.
    The importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in healthcare: A discussion paper2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1043-1050Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe aim of this paper was to discuss the importance of ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services in health care. BackgroundChallenges in healthcare today include a growing older population and, as a consequence, an increased need for healthcare services. One possible solution is the use of eHealth services. DesignDiscussion paper. Data sourcesResearch literature published from 2000-2017 in CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus. Implications for nursingImplementing eHealth services in health care involves ethical challenges where different technologies can solve different problems in different ways. eHealth services should therefore be developed and implemented based on the patient's specific needs and conditions for use and in accordance with the healthcare professionals' presumption to provide high-quality care. ConclusionTo preserve patients' integrity, dignity and autonomy, healthcare professionals must include ethical aspects when implementing and using eHealth services in health care. Healthcare professionals have to take responsibility for the eHealth services introduced, explaining why and how they are implemented based on a person-centred approach. More knowledge is needed about ethical aspects when implementing eHealth services to improve the quality of care.

  • 35.
    Stentagg, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sexuality is not age-related: an interview study2023In: Sexual and Relationship Therapy, ISSN 1468-1994, E-ISSN 1468-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased knowledge of how sexuality is expressed in older persons may create opportunities for healthcare professionals to perform care according to a person-centered approach. To describe older people’s experiences of sexuality concerning aging, a qualitative study was conducted. Eight persons aged 60 and above were interviewed, and the obtained data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings revealed that the participants were certain of being sexually active as they got older. Awareness of what old age can bring regarding illness and increased medication intake was clear, alongside the importance of discussing sexuality with friends or a partner. Age was not seen as an obstacle to continuously being sexually active, and new ways to maintain intimacy and sexuality were identified. According to our results sexuality in older people is about well-being and intimate relationships. Creating opportunities for a trusting, caring relationship can strengthen older people’s sexual health. Healthcare professionals must, therefore, make possibilities for trustful relationships to support and discuss sexuality with older people. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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  • 36.
    Stentagg, Magnus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Cross-Sectional Study of Sexual Activity and Satisfaction Among Older Adult's >= 60 Years of Age2021In: Sexual Medicine, E-ISSN 2050-1161, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 100316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Despite the rapidly increasing population of older adults, little is currently known about sexual activity and sexual satisfaction among the oldest people. Aim: The present study aimed to investigate sexual activity and sexual satisfaction among people of >= 60 years of age. We also examined whether sexual activity and sexual satisfaction were influenced by age, gender, cohabiting, socioeconomic factors, education, functional ability, and self-reported health. Methods: We performed a descriptive analysis of self-stated sexual activity and sexual satisfaction among 1680 participants who were 60 years and older from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to analyze relationships between factors. Main Outcome Measure: Sexual activity and sexual satisfaction. Results: Among participants aged >= 90 years, about 10% were sexually active. Within the total study population, 46% (654/1680) were sexually active. Overall, sexually activity was more commonly reported by men (55%) than women (40%). However, men in all age cohorts reported sexual dissatisfaction more commonly than women. In the total sample, 24% (246/1680) reported dissatisfaction with their sex life. Sexual activity and sexual satisfaction were positively associated with self-reported health and cohabitation. Conclusion: The present results suggest that sexual activity is present throughout life. For persons older than 90 years, about 10% of participants were sexually active, regardless of gender. Every third man reported dissatisfaction with his sex life. Women were more satisfied with their sex lives than men, and this difference varies more widely among age cohorts. These findings confirm that it is important that health professional take sexuality into account during caring encounters with older persons. Copyright (C) 2021, The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the International Society for Sexual Medicine.

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    Cross-Sectional Study of Sexual Activity and Satisfaction Among Older Adult's
  • 37. Vaismoradi, Mojtaba
    et al.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Bondas, Terese E.
    Normalizing suffering: A meta-synthesis of experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people who live in nursing homes commonly suffer from pain. Therefore, relieving suffering among older people that stems from pain demands knowledge improvement through an integration of international knowledge. This study aimed to integrate current international findings and strengthen the understanding of older people's experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes. A meta-synthesis study using Noblit and Hare's interpretative meta-ethnography approach was conducted. Empirical research papers from journals were collected from various databases. The search process and appraisal determined six articles for inclusion. Two studies were conducted in the US and one each in Iceland, Norway, the UK, and Australia. The older people's experiences of pain as well as perspectives on pain management from all involved (older people, their family members, and healthcare staff) were integrated into a theoretical model using three themes of "identity of pain," "recognition of pain," and "response to pain." The metaphor of "normalizing suffering" was devised to illustrate the meaning of pain experiences and pain management in nursing homes. Society's common attitude that pain is unavoidable and therefore acceptable in old age in society among older people themselves as well as those who are responsible for reporting, acknowledging, and relieving pain-must change. The article emphasizes that pain as a primary source of suffering can be relieved, provided that older people are encouraged to report their pain. In addition, healthcare staff require sufficient training to take a person-centered approach towards assessment and management of pain that considers all elements of pain.

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