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  • 1.
    Anderberg, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University College, SWE.
    Stjernberg, Louise
    Swedish Red Cross University College, SWE.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Analyzing nursing students’ relation to electronic health and technology as individuals and students and in their future career (the ENURSED study): Protocol for a longitudinal study2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 10, article id e14643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The nursing profession has undergone several changes in the past decades, and new challenges are to come in the future; patients are now cared for in their home, hospitals are more specialized, and primary care will have a key role. Health informatics is essential in all core competencies in nursing. From an educational perspective, it is of great importance that students are prepared for the new demands and needs of the patients. From a societal point of view, the society, health care included, is facing several challenges related to technological developments and digitization. Preparation for the next decade of nursing education and practice must be done, without the advantage of certainty. A training for not-yet-existing technologies where educators should not be limited by present practice paradigms is desirable. This study presents the design, method, and protocol for a study that investigates undergraduate nursing students’ internet use, knowledge about electronic health (eHealth), and attitudes to technology and how experiences of eHealth are handled during the education in a multicenter study. Objective: The primary aim of this research project is to describe the design of a longitudinal study and a qualitative substudy consisting of the following aspects that explore students’ knowledge about and relation to technology and eHealth: (1) what pre-existing knowledge and interest of this area the nursing students have and (2) how (and if) is it present in their education, (3) how do the students perceive this knowledge in their future career role, and (4) to what extent is the education capable of managing this knowledge? Methods: The study consists of two parts: a longitudinal study and a qualitative substudy. Students from the BSc in Nursing program from the Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden, and from the Swedish Red Cross University College, Stockholm/Huddinge, Sweden, were included in this study. Results: The study is ongoing. Data analysis is currently underway, and the first results are expected to be published in 2019. Conclusions: This study presents the design of a longitudinal study and a qualitative substudy. The eHealth in Nursing Education eNursEd study will answer several important questions about nursing students’ attitudes toward and use of information and communications technology in their private life, their education, and their emerging profession. Knowledge from this study will be used to compare different nursing programs and students’ knowledge about and relation to technology and eHealth. Results will also be communicated back to nursing educators to improve the teaching of eHealth, health informatics, and technology. ©Peter Anderberg, Gunilla Björling, Louise Stjernberg, Doris Bohman.

  • 2. Bohman, Doris
    Elderly South Africans' in transition: the daily life circumstances, beliefs concerning health and illness and the influences on caring and family structure2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to shed light on different aspects of elderly South Africans experiences in a transitional period in order to reach culturally contextual knowledge within gerontological care. The research objectives were to: identify and describe daily life and related concerns and interests as expressed by a group of elderly (I), illuminate how a group of elderly South Africans experience being old in a transitional period (II), study how a group of aged South Africans and their family members describe their intergenerational relations in a transitional period i.e. from a traditional to an industrialized society and how the transition influence the care of the aged in the extended family (III), illuminate beliefs in relation to health and illness expressed by elderly Africans within a South African context, in light of a society in transition (IV). The research takes an ethnographic approach concerned with the perspective of individuals; the life world and the lived body of an individual, to enable an in-depth understanding of the influence of culture and an understanding of the processes by which people develop meaning in their daily lives, acknowledging the existing mutual influence between the world, context, and the individual. Two analysis methods were used: qualitative content analysis (I-III), and interpretive phenomenology (IV). Altogether sixteen elderly individuals were engaged in the research project, including ten females and six males (aged 52-76 years) (I-IV). In study II-IV individual in-depth interviews were conducted with altogether ten elderly, nine female and one male participant from previous group interviews. In study III, nine elderly female from previous groups and individual interviews were engaged together with thirteen family members. The results show four main themes: Being old in a changing society, Interpersonal and intergenerational relations, Reciprocal care and Beliefs in a transitional period. The participants are reflecting on life and the changes that occurred during their life span and they return to disappointments and enjoyments in life (II). They express a growing frustration due to their powerlessness of not knowing what will happen to themselves and their family members also the loss of cultural norms and values are of great concern among the participants (I, II, III). Relations are essential in the lives of the participants and are viewed as a reassurance of support and care within the extended family (III). Interpersonal relations have a essential position in relation to health and illness, where illness may be caused due to disrupted interpersonal relations and on the other hand keeps one healthy when experiencing good relationships (II, IV). Caring is closely linked to respect and the role of reciprocity is emphasized (II, III). Believing is seen as an essential source for improving and maintaining health and being cured. Being sick is normal and suffering and illness is perceived as both natural and a way of purification. HIV/AIDS is regarded as a new and modern disease, but the consequences of it cannot be explained through normal reasoning of an illness making a person stronger and is instead explained as misfortune or "bad luck" (IV). The overall conclusion of the thesis is the importance of contextualized gerontological care and to acknowledge individuals beliefs in relation to health and illness. It further sheds light on the need of an African approach to gerontological care and the necessitate to be sensitive to local conditions. In a wider perspective the findings of this thesis can be used in education to create understanding for the life world of an individual and the importance of being aware of a person's cultural, socio-economical, spiritual and environmental circumstance to avoid the notion of otherness in caring.

  • 3.
    Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Student exchange for nursing students: Does it raise cultural awareness'? A descriptive, qualitative study2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 0260-6917, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With free movement for citizens within the European Union and with distant parts of our globe becoming more accessible, cultural awareness and cultural competence are becoming important skills for nurses. Internationalisation and raising awareness of other cultural contexts are essential elements in Swedish higher education, thus explaining the variety of student exchange programmes that are available. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of student exchange and their experiences. Data were collected through group interviews and then analysed following the principles of content analysis. Our analysis resulted in three categories: Preparing to go abroad, Reasons for going abroad and From expectation to experience. Cultural aspects and cultural awareness were emphasised as strong motivational factors, both personal and professional, behind participation in student exchange programmes. Information was also highlighted as a crucial means of reaching potential students as well as the power of knowledge through personal experience. This study highlights the importance of student exchange in expanding the individual student's personal and professional horizons. It also stresses the importance of including a transcultural nursing element in nursing curricula.

  • 4. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Wyk, Neltjie C. van
    Vasuthevan, Sharon
    "We clean our houses, prepare for the weddings and go to funerals or go for shopping"an ethnographic study of elderly African rural people in Majaneng, South Africa2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Wyk, Neltjie van
    Health, Illness, and Disease Beliefs in South African Context2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Wyk, Neltjie van
    Symposium: Qualitative methods can contribute to an understanding in nursing practice2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Ericsson, Terese
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Swedish nurses' perception of nursing research and its implementation in clinical practice: A focus group study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, nursing research is seen as an integral part of professional nursing although implementing knowledge derived from nursing research into the practice setting is still problematic. Current research, conducted mainly with a descriptive quantitative design, highlights the struggle experienced by Registered Nurses (RNs) to use and implement research findings in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this naturalistic inquiry was to explore nurses' perception of nursing research and its implementation in a clinical context. Method and sample: A qualitative approach was chosen, and four focus group discussions were conducted. The groups comprised a total of 16 RNs (three men and 13 women) working in a secondary care setting. The transcribed texts were analysed, inspired by Burnard's description of content analysis. Findings: The texts were interpreted as representing three predominant themes: scholastic, individual and contextual influences highlighted as influential components impacting on the RNs' views on research and its implementation as well as on their readiness to accept and support it. However, the most influential aspect permeating our themes was their educational background - the type of qualification they held. In general, the RNs with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing viewed research and the implementation of knowledge in practice more favourably than those RNs with a diploma. Conclusion: Our findings, although based on a small qualitative study, are congruent with others, indicating that further research is warranted concerning the impact of education on RNs' views of nursing research and its implementation. Hence, it might well be that the RNs' educational point of departure needs to be stressed more than what so far have been anticipated. In the meanwhile, it is possible that a number of strategies could be tested to promote a more favourable view in these issues and where the nursing education has the possibility to influence this endeavour.

  • 8.
    Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Mattsson, Linda
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Primary healthcare nurses' experiences of physical activity referrals: an interview study2015In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 270-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that viewing the PAR as a complex intervention, with all that this entails, might be one approach to increasing the number of PARs being issued. Simpler systems, more time and the potential for testing the effectiveness of follow-ups could be possible ways of achieving this. AIM: The aim of this study is to illuminate primary health care (PHC) nurses' experiences of physical activity referrals (PARs). BACKGROUND: Despite extensive knowledge about the substantial health effects physical activities can produce, fewer and fewer people in our modern society regularly engage in physical activity. Within health care and, particularly, within the PHC arena, nurses meet people on a daily basis who need help to engage in a healthier lifestyle. The possibility of issuing written prescriptions for physical activities, often referred to as PARs, has been introduced as a tool to support such lifestyles. However, even though PHC nurses can prescribe physical activities, studies investigating their experience in this type of nursing intervention are rare. METHODS: For this study, 12 semi-structured interviews were conducted with PHC nurses, and the transcribed texts were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. FINDINGS: Two categories--PARs, an important nursing intervention, and PARs, the necessity of organisational support--reflected the nurses' experiences in using PARs.

  • 9. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Vasuthevan, Sharon
    Wyk, Neltjie C. van
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    "We Clean Our Houses, Prepare for Weddings and Go to Funerals": Daily Lives of Elderly Africans in Majaneng, South Africa2007In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study aims to identify and describe how a group of elderly African people in South Africa experience their daily life and related concerns and interests. Data were collected through group interviews involving 16 elderly persons and complementary field observations. The data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. From the analysis following sub-themes emerged. 1. Lack of basic resources; 2. Routines in daily life; 3. Experience of unsafe conditions; 4. "The disease" - HIV/AIDS. The results have been discussed according to the following themes: keeping normality and changing society. The study illuminates the varied experiences in daily life, including lack of basic resources, experience of unsafe conditions, and the HIV/AIDS pandemic and its consequences for the elderly as contributors to the extended family.

  • 10. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Wyk, Neltjie C. van
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    South Africans' experiences of being old and of care and caring in a transitional period2011In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 187-195(9)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This focused ethnographic study aimed to illuminate a group of South Africans’ experiences of being old and of care and caring in a transitional period. With a growing number of older people in Africa, studies on the individual experiences may help to develop care which is more sensitively based on the needs for older people in a changing Southern Africa context. Data were collected through group and individual in-depth interviews and participant observations which involved 16 individuals, aged 52–76. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The study showed two interrelated themes reflections on life and ubuntu – an orientation towards others. Findings were discussed from the viewpoint of the theory of gerotranscendence, showing similarities as well as differences, possibly due to societal and cultural differences. Shortage of formal care for older people living in poor conditions in Southern Africa, gave rise to the discussion for the need of a contextualized development of gerontological care. To enhance knowledge on the theory of gerotranscendence and develop guidelines for nursing in home-based care/community-based care in a South African context may be a first step to support older people in their process towards gerotranscendence.

  • 11. Bohman, Doris
    et al.
    Wyk, Neltjie C. van
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Tradition in transition-intergenerational relations with focus on the aged and their family members in a South African context2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the intergenerational relations influence on the care of the aged in a transitional period expressed by a group of aged South Africans and their family members. Focused ethnographic research was carried out from 2001 to 2006 in a semi-rural area in central South Africa. Twenty-nine participants representing 16 families took part in multiple group interviews. The data was supplemented through individual interviews with 10 of the participants as well as home visits, participation in community activities, notes and video recording. The transcribed interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study shows aspects of tradition in transition as reciprocal care between generations, the significance of traditional values and the impact of modernization on care. The findings reveal the on going transition in Africa influencing the role of the aged as well as the reciprocal care within the extended family. The study also discloses that in reciprocal relationships, family members do not necessarily have a biological bond and that revaluing of traditions can be seen as a response to social and economic change and as a tool to maintain influence. This ethnographic study contributes knowledge in the field of gerontological care, by illuminating the impact of transition on the role of aged as well as the caring of the aged in the extended family an important issue for health professionals caring for a growing number of older persons in Southern Africa and in countries with a large representation of minority groups from developing countries.

  • 12. Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Hentzel, Johanna
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Public health care nurses' views of mothers' mental health in paediatric healthcare services: a qualitative study2015In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 470-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate public health nurses' perceptions and experiences of mental health and of the prevention of mental ill health among women postpartum, within paediatric healthcare services. Background: Although maternal health following childbirth should be a priority within primary care, it is known that women postpartum do not always receive the support they need to adapt to and cope with motherhood. Research implies that postnatal problems lack recognition and are not always acknowledged in routine practice. Few studies have been presented on this topic or from the perspective of nurses. Methods: For this study, eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with public health nurses, and the transcribed texts were analysed through a process inspired by Burnard's description of the four-step qualitative content analysis. Findings: Three categories - external influences on postpartum mental health, screening for and preventing postpartum mental ill health and paediatric healthcare services as a platform for support - were interpreted to reflect the nurses' perceptions and experiences of mental health among women postpartum and of the prevention of mental ill health among women postpartum. Conclusion: We found that public health nurses can have an important role in supporting mothers' mental health postpartum. Although caution is warranted in interpreting our results, the findings concur with those of other studies, highlighting that an equal care emphasis on both the mother and child can be an important aspect of successful support. Implementing person-centred care might be one strategy to create such an emphasis, while also promoting the mental health of new mothers. Public health nurses have a unique opportunity to support mothers' transition into healthy motherhood, especially because they are likely to meet both mothers and children on a regular basis during the first year after birth.

  • 13.
    Gustafsson, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Bohman, Doris M
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Gunilla, Borglin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Challenges of conducting experimental studies within a clinical nursing context2014In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 133-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, several distinguished scholars have advocated for nursing research that may carry strong evidence for practice. Their advocacy have highlighted that nursing science has reached a point where as nurse researchers we need to develop the questions we ask and design studies that have the power to produce solid, translational, evidence-based knowledge. To do so, we need to carry out experimental tests on complex, everyday nursing interventions and activities. We also need to create public space to present accounts of our endeavours pursuing this type of design in clinical practice. This paper will discuss some of the most important insights gained from conducting a quasi-experimental study in which the aim was to investigate the effect of a theory-based intervention, targeting knowledge and attitudes among registered nurses regarding cancer pain management. The importance of careful practical and methodological planning is emphasised and the need for participation-friendly interventions is discussed.

  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Case managers’ experiences of their everyday practice2013In: European Geriatric Medicine, Venice: Elsevier Masson SAS , 2013, Vol. 4, no Supplement 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction.– Today, there is an interest in how Case Management (CM) should be designed to best suit the complex needs of the older people with multi-morbidity. Current research on CM has mainly focused on health care costs and consumption, but the results have been inconsistent and ranging from positive outcomes to no effect. To improve CM, there is need to investigate what mechanisms are important for a successful intervention. To advance this knowledge, there is a necessity for studies investigating the experiences of those practicing CM i.e. Case Managers. There might be unknown factors or interpersonal factors that can contribute to a CM intervention's success or failure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the Case Managers’ experiences of their everyday practice. Methods.– The study design was qualitative and descriptive utilizing an ethnographic approach, consisting of participant observations, a focus group interview and individual interviews with nine Case Managers conducted during 2012/2013. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and then subjected to content analysis. Results.– Three main themes described Case Managers’ experience of their everyday practice: navigating the older person, working to improve the health care system and being the older persons advocate. Conclusions.– Findings from this study sheds light on the complexity of CM for older people with multi-morbidity, from the experiences of Case Managers. These findings could help in the development of CM models designed for older people with complex health needs.

  • 15.
    Gustafsson, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Case managers for older persons with multi-morbidity and their everyday work -- a focused ethnography2013In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Modern-day health systems are complex, making it difficult to assure continuity of care for older persons with multi-morbidity. One way of intervening in a health system that is leading to fragmented care is by utilising Case Management (CM). CM aims to improve co-ordination of healthcare and social services. To better understand and advance the development of CM, there is a need for additional research that provides rich descriptions of CM in practice. This knowledge is important as there could be unknown mechanisms, contextual or interpersonal, that contribute to the success or failure of a CM intervention. Furthermore, the CM intervention in this study is conducted in the context of the Swedish health system, which prior to this intervention was unfamiliar with this kind of coordinative service. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday work undertaken by case managers within a CM intervention, with a focus on their experiences. Methods The study design was qualitative and inductive, utilising a focused ethnographic approach. Data collection consisted of participant observations with field notes as well as a group interview and individual interviews with nine case managers, conducted in 2012/2013. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Results An overarching theme emerged from the data: Challenging current professional identity, with three sub-themes. The sub-themes were 1) Adjusting to familiar work in an unfamiliar role; 2) Striving to improve the health system through a new role; 3) Trust is vital to advocacy. Conclusions Findings from this study shed some light on the complexity of CM for older persons with multi-morbidity, as seen from the perspective of case managers. The findings illustrate how their everyday work as case managers represents a challenge to their current professional identity. These findings could help to understand and promote the development of CM models aimed at a population of older persons with complex health needs.

  • 16.
    Hjelm, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Holmgren, Ann-Charlotte
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Family members of older persons with multi-morbidity and their experiences of case managers in Sweden: an interpretive phenomenological approach2015In: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 15, no Jan-MarArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family members of older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity are likely to benefit from utilising case management services performed by case managers. However, research has not yet explored their experiences of case managers. Objectives: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of the importance of case managers to family members of older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. Design: The study design was based on an interpretive phenomenological approach. Method: Data were collected through individual interviews with 16 family members in Sweden. The interviews were analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach. Results: The findings revealed one overarching theme: “Helps to fulfil my unmet needs”, based on three sub-themes: (1) “Helps me feel secure – Experiencing a trusting relationship”, (2) “Confirms and strengthens me – Challenging my sense of being alone” and (3) “Being my personal guide – Increasing my competence”. Conclusion and discussion: The findings indicate that case managers were able to fulfil unmet needs of family members. The latter recognised the importance of case managers providing them with professional services tailored to their individual needs. The findings can contribute to the improvement of case management models not only for older persons but also for their family members.

  • 17.
    Hjelm, Markus
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Holst, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity – a focused ethnography2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Complex health systems make it difficult for older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity to achieve continuity of care. Case management could be one way to address this difficulty. Currently, there is a need to extend the knowledge regarding case management as experienced by those utilising the services, namely older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. The study aimed to explore older persons’ (75+) with multi-morbidity experiences of case managers.

    Methods

    The study design was qualitative and used a focused ethnographic approach. Data was collected through individual interviews with 13 older persons and by participant observations with accompanying field notes, all conducted in 2012–2013.

    Results

    The data revealed four themes illustrating the older persons’ experiences of case managers:

    1) Someone providing me with a trusting relationship; 2) Someone assisting me; 3) Someone who is on my side; and 4) Someone I do not need at present.

    Conclusions

    This study illustrates the importance of establishing trusting relationships between older persons and their case managers in order to truly provide assistance. The older persons valued the case managers acting as informed but unbiased facilitators. The findings could be of help in the development of case management interventions better designed for older persons with multi-morbidity.

  • 18.
    Hoffman, Jaco
    et al.
    North West University, ZAF.
    Roos, Vera
    North West University, ZAF.
    Stols, Anneke
    North West University, ZAF.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Older people's user patterns of mobile phones in South Africa2018In: Conference Issue. Abstracts of the 11th World Conference / [ed] W, Boot, G. Gutman, W. Kearns, J. Fozard, S. Leong, International Society for Gerontechnology , 2018, Vol. 17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Globally and in South Africa a growth in population ageing will consequently result in increasing care needs for older persons1. Given the deep penetration of mobile technology in developing countries (in Sub-Saharan Africa) it is expected to potentially play a more prominent role in social and health care provision2. The aim of this study is to explore older persons' user patterns and how intrdintergenerational relations manifest through the use of mobile phones in a South African context. Method A convergent parallel mixed methods design was employed3. Participants were representative of a broad range of different socio-economic levels based on the Living Standards Measure (LSM) scale. Quantitative data was collected by using a selfconstructed questionnaire (n=125), which was analysed using descriptive statistics and a chi- square test. Qualitative data were gathered by using semi-structured (n=23) and group interviews (n=10) as well as the Mmogo-methoda4, a visual data-collection method (n=19) and analysed thematically. Results & Discussion Findings indicated that the majority of older persons mainly use two functions of their mobile phones: to make and receive calls and sms' (texting) contact mostly in relation to their children and grandchildren. The limited knowledge and skill and in some instances negative attitude of older persons hamper full utilisation of their phones. Older persons across all LSM groups resort to other people to assist them, based on their assessment of the other person's knowledge, skill and attitude - constituting mobile use by older persons as an essentially intrdintergenerational project. Suitable interventions should include appropriate educational opportunities for all older persons, despite their level of knowledge and skills, but the importance of people who are perceived as competent is highly appraised by the older persons and interventions should also focus on this possibility. © 2018 International Society for Gerontechnology.

  • 19. Larsson-Mauleon, Annika
    et al.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Bohman, Doris
    Eggers, Thomas
    Sunvisson, H.
    Symposium: Qualitative methods2006.Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Symposium: Qualitative methods. International Human Science Research Conference. The Multicultural future of Qualitative Research, John F. Kennedy University – Pleasant Hill California, USA,

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Terese
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris M.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Elmstahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Jogreus, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Prevalence of unknown and untreated arrhythmias in an older outpatient population screened by wireless long-term recording ECG2016In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 11, p. 1083-1090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: With longer life expectancies, the prevalence of arrhythmias is increasing; thus, there is a need for new methods to screen the older outpatient population. This population-based study describes the prevalence of arrhythmias in 200 outpatients aged. 66 years. We also investigated the feasibility of wireless long-term recording (LTR) using the ECG-BodyKom (R). Methods: Two hundred elderly persons aged 66-93 years were recruited from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in 2010-2013, and data were collected via wireless LTR ECG-BodyKom. Results: Screening with the LTR ECG revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) occurred in 10% of the outpatient population aged. 66 years. Paroxysmal AF occurred in 5.5% of the population, with no difference between younger (60-80 years) and older (>80 years) elderly participants. Furthermore, all patients with paroxysmal AF had a CHA(2)DS(2)VASc score of >= 2 and were therefore potential candidates for follow-up and medical examination. LTR ECG-BodyKom can be considered a feasible method to screen for arrhythmias in older outpatient populations. This simple method requires little of the user, and there was high satisfaction with the equipment and a good overall experience wearing it. Conclusion: The increasing occurrence of arrhythmias in the older population, as well as the high number of untreated cases of arrhythmias such as persistent AF and paroxysmal AF, poses a challenge for health care. Therefore, it is essential to develop effective strategies for their prevention and treatment.

  • 21.
    Lindberg, Terese
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lunds Universitet, SWE.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Older individuals’ need for knowledge and follow-up about their chronic atrial fibrillation, lifelong medical treatment and medical controls2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1022-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older individuals with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) often experience physical symptoms and feel psychologically unwell. In addition, these persons are prescribed lifelong medical treatment that requires regular monitoring. Through 11 individual interviews, this interpretive description study aimed to explore and describe lifelong medical treatment and the need for medical controls as experienced from the perspective of older individuals living with chronic AF. The interviews were performed during 2014–2015; furthermore, they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic patterns using thematic analysis inspired by Braun and Clarke. Ethical standards were followed throughout the study. The findings revealed one main theme: ‘ambivalence in the need of knowledge’ showing that lifelong medical treatment and the need for medical controls, in general, meant experiencing feelings of ‘it doesn't matter, but it does matter’ and ‘being in the hands of the healthcare system’. The older persons lacked knowledge about their condition, which generated poor insight into their medical treatment and this in turn affected their daily life. They had thoughts and questions about their medication, but did not have an opportunity to ask the questions because of lack of follow-up from the healthcare system. The findings underscore the negative impact chronic AF has on older people's life and emphasises the need for follow-up and providing information from health care to these individuals. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science

  • 22.
    Lindberg, Terese
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Wimo, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, SWE.
    Elmstahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, SWE.
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Karolinska Inst, SWE.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Prevalence and Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation and Other Arrhythmias in the General Older Population: Findings From the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the prevalence and cumulative incidence of arrhythmias in the general population of adults aged 60 and older over a 6-year period. Study Design and Setting: Data were taken from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC), a national, longitudinal, multidisciplinary study of the general elderly population (defined as 60 years of age or older). A 12-lead resting electrocardiography (ECG) was performed at baseline and 6-year follow-up. Results: The baseline prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.5%, 5.5%]), and other arrhythmias including ventricular premature complexes (VPCs), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and supraventricular extrasystole (SVES) were seen in 8.4% (7.7%, 9.0%) of the population. A first- or second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block was found in 7.1% of the population (95% CI = [6.5%, 7.7%]), and there were no significant differences between men and women in baseline arrhythmia prevalence. The 6-year cumulative incidence of AF was 4.1% (95% CI = [3.5%, 4.9%]), or 6.9/1,000 person-years (py; 95% CI = [5.7, 8.0]). The incidence of AF, other arrhythmias, AV block, and pacemaker-induced rhythm was significantly higher in men in all cohorts except for the oldest. Conclusion: Our data highlight the prevalence and incidence of arrhythmias, which rapidly increase with advancing age in the general population.

  • 23.
    Marcinowicz, Ludmiła
    et al.
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Hjelm, Markus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skarbalienė, Aelita
    Klaipeda University, LTU.
    Shpakou, Andrei
    Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, UKR.
    Kalinowska, P.
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Jamiolkowski, Jacek
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Nursing students’ perception of the professional nurse's role in four European countries2019In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding how nursing students in European countries perceive their future professional role is an important step in creating awareness of the diversity and similarities between countries. Investigating nursing students’ perceptions of their future profession could help in the design of education and the retention of nurses. Aim: To compare nursing students’ perceptions of the professional nurse's role between Belarus, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden. Method: A cross-sectional design was implemented. The study used two scales of the Professional Nursing Image Survey, which has questions about 10 skills and abilities and 14 functions and duties of a nurse. Results: A total of 392 final-year nursing students in four countries participated in the study. Statistically significant differences were found between countries in terms of all 10 skills and abilities and in the distribution of responses concerning functions and duties of a nurse. Conclusions: Nursing students in Belarus, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden perceive differently the role of a nurse in terms of some functions and responsibilities. This may influence the adaptation of nurses who enjoy freedom of movement among the countries. Implications for nursing policy: The knowledge gained in this study could be beneficial in improving nursing education, as it could illuminate the discrepancy between educational goals and students’ perceptions of their future professional role. © 2018 International Council of Nurses

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