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  • 1. Alves, G.R.
    et al.
    Marques, M.A.
    Viegas, C
    Lobo, M.C. Costa
    Barral, R.G.
    Couto, R.J.
    Jaob, F.L.
    Ramos, C.A.
    Vilao, G.M.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Using VISIR in a large undergraduate course: Preliminary assessment results2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of remote labs in undergraduate courses has been reported in literature several times since the mid 90's. Nevertheless, very few articles present results about the learning gains obtained by students using them, especially with a large number of students, thus suggesting a lack of data concerning their pedagogical effectiveness. This paper addresses such a gap by presenting some preliminary results concerning the use of a remote laboratory, known as VISIR, in a large undergraduate course on Applied Physics, with over 500 students enrolled.

  • 2.
    Arguedas-Matarrita, Carlos
    et al.
    Universidad Estatal a Distancia, Escuela de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. CRI.
    Beatriz Concari, Sonia
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    García-Zubía, Javier
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Marchisio, Susana Teresa
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Hernández-Jayo, Unai
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Alves, Gustavo
    IPP, Felgueiras, PRT.
    Uriarte-Canivell, Iñigo
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Villalobos, Marco Conejo
    Universidad Estatal a Distancia, Escuela de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. CRI.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Elizondo, Fernando Ureña
    Universidad Estatal a Distancia, Escuela de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. CRI.
    A teacher training workshop to promote the use of the VISIR remote laboratory for electrical circuits teaching2017In: Proceedings of 2017 4th Experiment at International Conference: Online Experimentation, exp.at 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The learning of Physics involves building up and using lab experiments. In turn, teachers must be trained in experimenting and using several resources that enable them to design valuable teaching strategies and learning activities. Thanks to Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), virtual and remote labs can provide a framework where physical experiments can be developed. Altough remote labs have been in use for over a decade now in several countries and levels of education, its use at secondary schools in Latin America has not been reported yet. The Virtual Instruments System in Reality (VISIR) is one of these remote labs, suitable to practice in the area of electrical circuits. This paper aims at describing how this remote lab was used in a training workshop for secondary school level teachers of Physics in Costa Rica. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 3. A.V., Fidalgo
    et al.
    G.R., Alves
    M.A., Marques
    M.C, Viegas
    M.C, Costa-Lobo
    U., Henandez-Jayo
    J., Garcia-Zúbia
    Ingvar, Gustavsson
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Adapting remote labs to learning scenarios: Case studies using VISIR and remotElectLab2014In: Revista Iberoamericana de Tecnologias del Aprendizaje, ISSN 1932-8540, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote laboratories are an emergent technological and pedagogical tool at all education levels, and their widespread use is an important part of their own improvement and evolution. This paper describes several issues encountered on laboratorial classes, on higher education courses, when using remote laboratories based on PXI systems, either using the VISIR system or an alternate in-house solution. Three main issues are presented and explained, all reported by teachers, that gave support to students' use of remote laboratories. The first issue deals with the need to allow students to select the actual place where an ammeter is to be inserted on electric circuits, even incorrectly, therefore emulating real-world difficulties. The second one deals with problems with timing when several measurements are required at short intervals, as in the discharge cycle of a capacitor. In addition, the last issue deals with the use of a multimeter in dc mode when reading ac values, a use that collides with the lab settings. All scenarios are presented and discussed, including the solution found for each case. The conclusion derived from the described work is that the remote laboratories area is an expanding field, where practical use leads to improvement and evolution of the available solutions, requiring a strict cooperation and information-sharing between all actors, i.e., developers, teachers, and students.

  • 4.
    Branco, Matheus
    et al.
    950 - Centro, Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Coelho, Leticia
    Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Schlichting, Louis
    950 - Centro, Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Marques, Maria Arcelina
    Instituto Politcnico do Porto, PRT.
    Alves, Gustavo
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Differentiating simulations and real (remote) experiments2017In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The more recent emergence of remote laboratories caused some discussions about their real educational value, when compared to traditional hands-on and virtual laboratories. This discussion is relevant because remote labs rely on computer-mediated access to real instruments and apparatus, being sometimes difficult to explain the difference between values obtained from real (remote) measurements and values obtained from computer simulations. This paper aims to evidence aspects that differentiate remote and virtual laboratories, by presenting two very simple experiments dealing with the characteristics of real instruments (limited bandwidth) and real circuits (electromagnetic interference). © 2017 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 5.
    Evangelista, Ignacio
    et al.
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Farina, Juan
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Pozzo, Maria Isabel
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Dobboletta, Elsa
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Alves, Gustavo
    IPP, Felgueiras, PRT.
    García-Zubía, Javier
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Hernández, Unai
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Marchisio, Susana Teresa
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Concari, Sonia
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Science education at high school: A VISIR remote lab implementation2017In: Proceedings of 2017 4th Experiment at International Conference: Online Experimentation, exp.at 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 13-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimentation is crucial in science teaching at any education level. Students' motivation and collaborative work are also essential in order to achieve positive learning outcomes. This article portrays the implementation of remote experimentation using VISIR in a Physics subject at high-school level. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed for this particular case study in order to shed light on the influence of VISIR on students' motivation. Results showed that VISIR remote lab is a powerful tool to arouse interest in electronic circuit topics. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 6. Fidalgo, André
    et al.
    Alves, Gustavo
    Marques, Maria A.
    Viegas, Maria C.
    Costa-Lobo, Maria C.
    Hernández, Unai
    García-Zubia, Javier
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Using remote labs to serve different teacher's needs: A case study with VISIR and RemotElectLab2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote Laboratories are an emergent technological and pedagogical tool at all education levels, and their widespread use is an important part of their own improvement and evolution. This paper describes several issues encountered on laboratorial classes, on higher education courses, when using remote laboratories based on PXI systems, either using the VISIR system or an alternate in-house solution. Three main issues are presented and explained, all reported by teachers that gave support to students use of remote laboratories. The first issue deals with the need to allow students to select the actual place where an ammeter is to be inserted on electric circuits, even incorrectly, therefore emulating real world difficulties. The second one deals with problems with timing when several measurements are required at short intervals, as in the discharge cycle of a capacitor. And the last issue deals with the use of a multimeter in DC mode when reading AC values, a use that collides with the lab settings. All scenarios are presented and discussed including the solution found for each case. The conclusion derived from the described work is that the remote laboratories area is an expanding field, where practical use leads to improvement and evolution of the available solutions, requiring a strict cooperation and information sharing between all actors, i.e. developers, teachers and students.

  • 7.
    Garcia-Loro, Felix
    et al.
    Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Electronics, ESP.
    Macho, Alejandro
    Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Electronics, ESP.
    Cristobal, Elio San
    Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Electronics, ESP.
    Diaz, Gabriel
    Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Electronics, ESP.
    Castro, M.
    Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Electronics, ESP.
    Kulesza, Wlodek
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Fidalgo, André V.
    Polytechnic of Porto, PRT.
    Alves, Gustavo
    Polytechnic of Porto, PRT.
    Marques, Arcelina
    Polytechnic of Porto, PRT.
    Hernandez-Jayo, Unai
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Garcia-Zubia, Javier
    Universidad de Deusto, ESP.
    Kreiter, Christian
    Fachhochshule Technikum Karnten, AUT.
    Oros, Ramona Georgiana
    Fachhochshule Technikum Karnten, AUT.
    Pester, A.
    Fachhochshule Technikum Karnten, AUT.
    Garbi-Zutin, Danilo
    International Association of Online Engineering (IAOE), AUT.
    Auer, Michael E.
    International Association of Online Engineering (IAOE), AUT.
    Garcia-Hernandez, Carla
    EVM., Tenerife, ESP.
    Tavio, Ricardo
    EVM., Tenerife, ESP.
    Valtonen, Kati
    OMNIA, Helsinki, FIN.
    Lehtikangas, Elina
    OMNIA, Helsinki, FIN.
    Experimenting in PILAR federation: A common path for the future2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE Computer Society , 2018, p. 1518-1523Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PILAR (Platform Integration of Laboratories based on the Architecture of visiR) Erasmus Plus project started in September 2016 and will last three years. The core of the PILAR project is the VISIR remote laboratory-Virtual Instruments System In Reality-. The project aims for a federation of five of the existing VISIR nodes, sharing experiments, capacity and resources among partners, and to provide access to VISIR remote lab, through PILAR consortium, to students from other educational institutions. PILAR will be the framework from which management tasks will be performed and laboratories/experiments will be shared. PILAR will also foster the Special Interest Group of VISIR under the Global Online Laboratory Consortium (GOLC) of the International Association of Online Engineering (IAOE). © 2018 IEEE.

  • 8.
    Garcia-Zubia, Javier
    et al.
    Univ Deusto, ESP.
    Cuadros, Jordi
    Univ Ramon Llull, ESP.
    Romero, Susana
    Univ Deusto, ESP.
    Hernandez-Jayo, Unai
    Univ Deusto, ESP.
    Orduna, Pablo
    Univ Deusto, ESP.
    Guenaga, Mariluz
    Univ Deusto, ESP.
    Gonzalez-Sabate, Lucinio
    Univ Ramon Llull, ESP.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing. Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Signal Processing.
    Empirical Analysis of the Use of the VISIR Remote Lab in Teaching Analog Electronics2017In: IEEE Transactions on Education, ISSN 0018-9359, E-ISSN 1557-9638, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 149-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote laboratories give students the opportunity of experimenting in STEM by using the Internet to control and measure an experimental setting. Remote laboratories are increasingly used in the classroom to complement, or substitute for, hands-on laboratories, so it is important to know its learning value. While many authors approach this question through qualitative analyses, this paper reports a replicated quantitative study that evaluates the teaching performance of one of these resources, the virtual instrument systems in reality (VISIR) remote laboratory. VISIR, described here, is the most popular remote laboratory for basic analog electronics. This paper hypothesizes that use of a remote laboratory has a positive effect on students' learning process. This report analyzes the effect of the use of VISIR in five different groups of students from two different academic years (2013-2014 and 2014-2015), with three teachers and at two educational levels. The empirical experience focuses on Ohm's Law. The results obtained are reported using a pretest and post-test design. The tests were carefully designed and analyzed, and their reliability and validity were assessed. The analysis of knowledge test question results shows that the post-test scores are higher that the pretest. The difference is significant according to Wilcoxon test (p < 0.001), and produces a Cohen effect size of 1.0. The VISIR remote laboratory's positive effect on students' learning processes indicates that remote laboratories can produce a positive effect in students' learning if an appropriate activity is used.

  • 9. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A Flexible Remote Electronics Laboratory for Engineering Education2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall goal of engineering education is to prepare students to practice engineering and, in particular, to deal with the forces and materials of nature. Thus, from the earliest days of engineering education, instructional laboratories have been an essential part of undergraduate programs. However, during the last decades the author and others have noted a trend towards increased use of simulations replacing physical experiments in electrical engineering education. One obvious reason is the fact that instructional laboratories are expensive to maintain. Another possible reason is the persistence of the belief that simulations can replace physical experiments. However, physical experiments are indispensable for developing skills to deal with physical processes and instrumentation. The Internet provides new possibilities for universities and other teaching organizations to share laboratories. Blekinge Institute of Technology (hereafter referred to as BTH) in Sweden has opened a traditional electronics laboratory for remote operation 24-7 and fitted the laboratory with a unique virtual interface where the students on the computer screen recognize the desktop instruments and the breadboard they have already used in the local laboratory. The fact that teachers in different countries can use existing teaching material in their own language is also unique for this laboratory. Instrument manuals can be downloaded from the web sites of the manufacturers. The activities started 1999 at BTH and the amount of work spent so far is approximately 12 man-years. The BTH design and has been awarded a Best Paper Award at the ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Annual Conference in Montreal 2002. Most remote electronics laboratories elsewhere offer fixed experiments but in this one, students around the world can simultaneously wire circuits much like they do in the local laboratory. The BTH laboratory is a client/server application and the Internet is used as the communication infrastructure. The equipment provided comprises a dual channel oscilloscope, a digital multi-meter a triple DC power supply, a circuit wiring robot, and component sets selected by the teachers who have written the lab instruction manuals for the courses. The laboratory staff has mounted these component sets in the circuit assembly robot in the equipment server at BTH and photographs of the components in a set will be displayed in a component box on the client PC screens. Thus a certain set of components is provided for each lab session. The current laboratory supports only instrument models used at BTH. Other universities have other models and a virtual equipment shelf containing other instruments from different manufacturers will be added. The performance of the provided hardware matches most instrument models used in undergraduate education. Students use the mouse to wire instruments and components from the component box to form a circuit on the breadboard displayed on each client PC. They thus control the robot by means of the wiring on the virtual breadboard, Figure 1. The robot is not a mechanical device but a switching matrix consisting of relays, sockets for components, and instrument connectors. Virtual instrument front panels are used to control and read the computer-based instruments by means of remote control, Figure 2. Most of the instruments in the equipment server are manufactured by National Instruments. To avoid damage to components and/or instruments, the teachers define maximum source voltages and all permitted current loops. However, harmless mistakes are allowed. A virtual instructor routine checks each desired circuit and acknowledges the circuit when the voltage levels are not too high and it only contains permitted current loops. Thus, if a user damages a component or an instrument the teacher is to blame not the user. A description of the laboratory can be found in: I. Gustavsson, J. Zackrisson, H. Åkesson, L. Håkansson, "A Flexible Remote Electronics Laboratory", Proceedings of the 2005 REV symposium, Brasov, Romania, June 30 - July 1, 2005. Figure 1. An operational amplifier (μA741) circuit wired on the virtual breadboard. Figure 2. The oscilloscope virtual front panel displaying the slew rate of the uA741 operational amplifier in the circuit on the breadboard illustrated in Figure 1. Access to the laboratory is restricted by a reservation system. The main items of this system are students, courses, and lab sessions in order to fit the traditional university system. The teacher of a course makes time reservations for regular supervised lab sessions of the course and specifies also the sets of components to be used in the sessions. Only students enrolled in the course are permitted to perform experiments using the component sets belonging to the lab sessions of that course. However, there are two guest courses open to the public. In each of the guest courses there is a lab session and a set of components. Only a 56 kbit/s modem and a web browser are required to access these experimental resources. The laboratory is always open and can be used by registered students and guest users around the world. The time-sharing scheme used allows simultaneous access with acceptable response time for 8 client PCs. The address of the laboratory web site is http://distanslabserver.its.bth.se/. Universities and other teaching organizations are invited to let their students conduct experiments and to provide regular lab sessions using their own components and learning material in the language of their choice. Expensive laboratory equipment can be provided for students with no time or space limitations. Apart from the fact that each student or team of students using a client computer works in a virtual environment with no face-to-face contact with the instructor or other students in the laboratory, the difference between a lab session in the laboratory presented here and a session in a local laboratory is that it is not possible for users to manipulate the components and the wires with their fingers in a remote laboratory. However, the latter constitutes a new educational tool which is ready for use in undergraduate education and in secondary schools as well as in vocational training and life-long learning. Remote experiments will not replace local lab sessions but supplement them and make experiments more accessible, especially for inexperienced or less confident people requiring more time. It may be possible to compensate for the reduction in the number of traditional lab sessions during the past few decades and even improve electronics courses without incurring any increase in cost. New more effective teaching methods may emerge. Experiments can, for example, easily be integrated into lectures. How about opening a laboratory containing mechanical components? In most cases sound and/or video image transmission will be required. A remote vibration analysis laboratory is being set up at BTH and will provide a platform for an evaluation of the feasibility of remote vibration experiments using the same concept. A dynamic signal analyzer, Agilent 35670A, connected to a server and traditional vibration sensors and actuators for experimental vibration analysis will be used. As a first example this setup will enable estimation of the important quantities in experimental vibration analysis based on measurements on a boring bar. Such bars are responsible for the majority of vibration problems in turning. The intention is to provide the students with vibration experiments related to an authentic important vibration problem in the industry. The research field has wider implications. Engineering education is not as popular today as it should be given the spread of technology in society. However, it is not so exciting to disassemble a modern digital alarm clock as grandmother’s one! Technical devices in our everyday life are no longer transparent. It has been reported that most teachers in, for example, nursery schools influencing our children have no technical courses whatsoever in their own professional training. The ultimate goal for the research at BTH is ubiquitous physical experimental resources accessible 24-7 for everyone to inspire and encourage children, young people and others to study engineering and become good professionals or to be used as means for long life learning of teachers and other professionals.

  • 10. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A General Framework for a Module Based Distributed Online-Lab Network/Grid based on Open Source Technologies2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to combine theoretical knowledge and practice, many Universities and Schools have setup online laboratories, allowing students to deepen their theoretical knowledge and to gain some practical experience by attending online experiments over the Internet. Especially in the field of engineering and sciences, laboratories in Universities as well as in SMEs are an essential part of education and have demonstrated their success. The fundamental idea of this project is to build-up a self-growing Online-Lab-Grid consisting of different online laboratories all around the world which will bring together scientists, learners and pedagogues from all over Europe and overseas. The open remotely controllable laboratories at Blekinge Institute of Technology (hereafter referred to as BTH) in Sweden are examples of a module based laboratory designed to be distributed. They are used in regular courses for both distant learning students and campus students. The electronics laboratory is equipped with a unique virtual interface enabling students to recognize on their own computer screen the desktop instruments and the breadboard they have already used in the local laboratory. This is a way to increase opportunities for students to perform physical experiments and to compensate for the reduced number of such activities in undergraduate education during the last decades without incurring any increase in cost. The laboratories consist of modules communicating with xml based protocols. The goal is an international standard, enabling research teams worldwide to jointly expand and develop this and other powerful approaches by using standardized open source software and shared equipment platforms. The Carinthia Tech Institute is developing a software-based Web portal for online laboratories, which enables an interconnection of different online laboratories on different places all around the world. This Web portal offers the opportunity to share online laboratories within a common framework and thus increasing the network capability over all.

  • 11. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A Remote Access Laboratory for Electrical Circuit Experiments2003In: International journal of engineering education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 409-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many laboratory experiments in electrical engineering courses can be performed remotely using real equipment in a laboratory. Traditional circuit theory experiments have been conducted over the Internet at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Sweden using the same experimental set-up from different locations simultaneously. The circuits are formed using remotely controlled switch matrices. The instruments and switch matrices used are computer-based PXI (PCI Extensions for instrumentation) devices which have virtual front panels that can be displayed on a remote PC. This approach is neither a simulation nor a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) application. The students control the instruments in the same way as they would in a local laboratory. The only difference is that they do not form the circuits and connect the test probes manually. These laboratory experiments have been used successfully in undergraduate engineering education at BTH and at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden using a lab server at BTH. Two transducer laboratory exercises are also available for more experienced students, who mostly welcome the chance of doing the experiments from home at any convenient time. These exercises contain comparatively slow mechanical movements allowing only one user to be logged on and controlling the experiments at once. Video transmission is provided so other users can follow what is happening and also perform parts of the experiments.

  • 12. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A Remote Lab for Electrical Experiments2003In: Lab on the Web -- Running Real Electronics Experiments via the Internet / [ed] SHUR, T. A. FJELDLY and M. S., New York : John Wiley & Sons , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional laboratory experiments in electrical engineering are provided remotely over the Internet using lab equipment at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Sweden for distant learning students as well as for other people around the globe. The circuit theory experiments offered can be conducted from different locations simultaneously. Two transducer exercises are also available. These contain comparatively slow mechanical movements, and only one user at a time can be logged on and control the experiments. Video transmission is also provided to monitor the movements. Both types of laboratory exercises are used in undergraduate education at BTH. The address of the home page of the laboratory is http://www.its.bth.se/distancelab/english/. There you will find software packages to be used to access the lab equipment and also instructions etc.

  • 13. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A Remote Laboratory for Electrical Experiments2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many laboratory experiments in electrical engineering courses can be performed remotely using real equipment. Conventional electrical circuit experiments have been conducted over the Internet at BTH (Blekinge Tekniska Högskola: The Blekinge Institute of Technology) in Sweden from different locations simultaneously using an experimental hardware setup in a closed room at BTH. This is neither a simulation nor a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) application. The students control the instruments in the same way as they would in the local laboratory. The only difference is that they do not form the circuits and connect the test probes manually. Not only the experiment itself is important but also the measurement procedure and the handling of the instruments.

  • 14. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    A traditional electronics laboratory with Internet access2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electronics laboratory with Internet access emulating a traditional university laboratory for undergraduate education has been set up at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Sweden. People located in different places around the globe can perform experiments simultaneously using client PCs connected to the BTH lab server via the Internet. Only a 56 kbit/s modem and MS Internet Explorer are required. The client software can be downloaded from the laboratory web site. Equipment such as power supply, function generator, digital multi-meter, oscilloscope, and breadboard are provided. A breadboard is used by the students to form the circuits and connect the test probes. This paper describes the laboratory and discusses some implementation issues.

  • 15. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    How to open a local electronics laboratory for remote access2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A local electronics laboratory can be opened for remote access using the VISIR Open Lab Platform. This is a way to open the laboratory for students on campus and off cam-pus 24/7 without any risk for themselves or the experimental equipment. The VISIR Open Lab Platform is a server/client application enabling learners to perform physical electrical experiments described in lab instruction manuals over the internet using a web browser. Virtual front panels and a virtual breadboard displayed on the client PCs are used to control the physical equipment connected to the server. The server is a time shared online workbench giving the learners the impression that they are working in a real laboratory. Such a workbench supplements a local laboratory equipped with work-benches comprising oscilloscope, function generator, DMM, triple power supply, and a solderless breadboard. Apart from Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden, where the platform has been created two universities, University of Deusto in Spain and FH Campus Wien in Aus-tria, have already implemented copies of the workbench and use them in their regular education. Other universities are ready to start. Thus, the workbench is being used at universities but it is perfect for schools and for vocational education as well. It is easy for teachers to introduce their own existing lab assignments. A modem connection and a web browser with Flash player are sufficient for the learner. The software required to set up such a workbench was published approximately a year ago under a GNU GPL licence. Apart from a standard PC the hardware required to join the VISIR Group and implement a workbench is a PXI chassis with instruments from National Instruments and a switching matrix. The components to be used by the learners are to be provided by the teachers and installed in the matrix. Universities, schools and other teaching organizations are invited to participate and open their local laboratories for remote access in order to be able to produce engineers with a solid and documented lab experience but without significantly increased cost per student. This tutorial is divided into four parts. They are about: • a general overview of the platform and its performance from the perspectives of the student and the teacher • lab course administration • how to provide components for remote users and how to avoid damage of ex-perimental equipment • A hands-on session, where the participants are invited to perform experiments using their laptops. Only WLAN and Flash Player are required. The presentations, notes pages and material for the hands-on session will be available at http://openlabs.bth.se/electronics/tutorial. Please download it and bring it to the tutorial.

  • 16. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    INNOVATIONS 2004: World Innovations in Engineering Education and Research2004In: 2004-07-21 / [ed] Aung, Win, Arlington: iNEER , 2004, p. 163-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory (lab) work is recognized as an efficient method for students to assimilate knowledge and develop skills for solving real world problems. A traditional undergraduate electronics laboratory at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden, provides eight identical lab stations. Each station is equipped with a breadboard, some desktop instruments and a power supply. The Internet provides new opportunities for remote experimentation. Laboratory exercises in electrical engineering courses such as circuit theory and basic electronics can be performed remotely using real equipment. Experiments on electrical circuits have been conducted over the Internet using experimental hardware located in a small closed room at BTH. This tiny laboratory provides one lab station equipped with computer-based instruments and a remotely controlled switch matrix to replace the traditional breadboard. The matrix makes it possible to make all the necessary connections to form a circuit and to connect test probes. The aim is to emulate a traditional laboratory. This paper describes the remote laboratory implemented and compares it with a traditional one at BTH.

  • 17.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Signal Processing.
    Laboratory Experiments in Distance Learning2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In engineering education, laboratory experiments are indispensable, but they do require instruments and experimental equipment to be performed. Instruments are expensive and mostly located in laboratories. Experiments in circuit theory and other similar courses are easy to control. You use electronic instruments to see what is happening. Instruments are easy to control from a PC and so are switch units used to form test circuits and connect test probes and sources. Anyone can now do experiments over the Internet, from anywhere, using a client PC connected to a lab server at the Blekinge Institute of Technology, BTH, in Sweden. On the client screen you will see virtual front panels of the real instruments located in the lab at BTH. You may use the mouse to set the control knobs. The appearance of the virtual front panel and the real one is almost the same so later it should be easy to use a real instrument. The server supports several clients simultaneously.

  • 18. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    On Remote Electronics Experiments2011In: Using Remote Labs in Education / [ed] Zubia, Javier Garcia; Alves, Gustavo R., Bilbao: Duesto University Press , 2011, p. 157-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical experiments are common at schools and universities worldwide. Today several remote laboratories for such experiments supplement hands-on ones in science and engineering education. Some of the remote laboratories, where online students can perform physical experiments and get the same results as in a hands-on laboratory, are more or less replicas of hands-on ones [1], [2], [3]. Thus, online students compose circuits using real components and make real measurements on the circuits created. In this chapter, a workbench for remote electrical experiments based on the VISIR Open Lab Platform (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) designed at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) is compared with hands-on ones. Since some years, such VISIR workbenches are used in regular university courses and at least one VISIR workbench is being tested in courses at lower levels [4], [5]. Some further development of the online workbench desirable to better adapt it to school level is discussed as well. The chapter may also serve as an introduction to online electrical experiments for teachers.

  • 19. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Remote Laboratory Experiments in Electrical Engineering Education2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A remote or online laboratory is a laboratory where you can access experiments and instruments or other equipment from outside over the Internet. Laboratories for undergraduate education or vocational training in basic electrical engineering are easy to control remotely. You cannot see the electrical current with your eyes or hear it so there is no need for sound or video transmission. Computer-based instruments do not have any control buttons or displays on the front panel. They have virtual front panels on the host computer only and those panels can be moved to a remote computer screen. However, the manual forming of circuits and connecting of test probes cannot be transferred. These actions have to be performed in another way in a remote laboratory. Remotely controllable switch matrices must be used. In the remote laboratory at BTH (Blekinge Institute of Technology) a client/server architecture is used. The student makes all the settings wanted on her client computer and then sends them to a lab server. The server makes measure-ments requested and returns the data obtained. The whole procedure takes only a second or two. A number of clients can access the experiments simultaneously. The laboratory is used in ordinary courses for on-campus students. They ac-cess the laboratory from a computer hall or from elsewhere outside the university. Due to the low number of bytes trans-ferred a 56 kbit modem will do.

  • 20. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Traditional laboratory exercises and remote experiments in electrical engineering education2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory work is recognized as an efficient method for students to assimilate knowledge and to develop skills for solving real world problems. The Internet provides new opportunities for remote experimentation. Laboratory exercises in electrical engineering courses such as circuit theory and basic electronics can be performed remotely using real equipment. What equipment is required for remote experiments? Is it possible to design and implement a traditional laboratory with Internet access only? A traditional undergraduate electronics laboratory at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden, makes eight identical lab stations available. Each station is equipped with a breadboard, some desk top instruments and a power supply. Experiments on electrical circuits have been conducted over the Internet using experimental hardware located in a small closed room at BTH. This tiny laboratory provides one lab station equipped with computer-based instruments and a remotely controlled switch matrix to replace the traditional breadboard. The matrix makes it possible to make all the necessary connections needed to form a circuit and to connect test probes in a fraction of a second. Is it possible to use time sharing to enable students to perform experiments simultaneously at eight different locations? How can I argue that a remote experiment is not a simulation? This paper addresses these and other similar questions and discusses some implementation issues. The address of the laboratory home page is http://www.its.bth.se/distancelab/english/.

  • 21. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    User-defined Electrical Experiments in a Remote Laboratory2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory exercises in electrical engineering courses can be performed remotely using real equipment. A number of user-defined experiments on electrical circuits have been conducted over the Internet at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden; the experiments have been carried out in different locations simultaneously using the same experimental hardware located in a small closed laboratory at BTH. The laboratory provides a remotely controlled switch matrix, two function generators, a digital multi-meter, and an oscilloscope. The matrix replaces the traditional breadboard and students and other users around the globe use it to form circuits from components mounted in component holders in the matrix. It has five nodes; a jumper lead or up to four components can be connected between each pair of nodes. The laboratory supervisor or a teacher can easily swap components. Users control the instruments using virtual front panels in the same way as they had done earlier in the local laboratory; the only difference is that they no longer form the circuits and connect the test probes manually. Circuits are defined using PSpice compatible net lists. The sources and components available in the laboratory are listed in a library. This library can be added to the libraries in, for example, the evaluation version of PSpice. Students can, within certain limits, modify the circuits shown in the laboratory instruction manuals or even design circuits of their own. A virtual laboratory instructor checks the circuits formed automatically before the voltage is applied to avoid possible damage. Is it possible to establish a reasonable balance between the teachers’ needs and the complexity of the hardware? Can the virtual instructor check the circuits formed without making advanced calculations or simulations? This paper addresses these questions and discusses implementation issues.

  • 22. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Claesson, Lena
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Zubia, Javier Garcia
    Jayo, Unai Hernandez
    Håkansson, Lars
    Bartunek, Josef Ström
    Lagö, Thomas L
    Claesson, Ingvar
    The VISIR Open Lab Platform2011In: Internet Accessible Remote Laboratories: Scalable E-Learning Tools for Engineering and Science Disciplines / [ed] Azad, Abul K.M.; Auer, Michael E.; Harward, V. Judson, IGI Global , 2011, p. 294-317Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The VISIR Open Lab Platform designed at the Department of Electrical Engineering (AET), the Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden, is a platform for opening instructional laboratories for remote access 24/7 with preserved context. VISIR is an acronym for Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality. In VISIR laboratories, students perform physical experiments and laboratory work remotely. A unique interface gives them the feeling of “being there.” The platform software is published under a GPL license, and other universities, schools, etc., are invited use it to open their laboratories and to participate in further research and development. Apart from BTH, five universities in Europe have set up VISIR online laboratories for electrical experiments and the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in India will set up one soon. A VISIR community has been established. Common projects are initiated, and the sharing of learning material is being discussed. This chapter is a general introduction to VISIR and its possibilities.

  • 23. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    , Johan Zackrisson
    A tutorial on the VISIR Open Laboratory Platform and an invitation to join the VISIR Community2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A local instructional laboratory for electrical experiments can be opened for remote ac-cess using the VISIR Open Laboratory Platform. A VISIR Open Laboratory is a server/client application enabling students to perform physical electrical experiments within limits set by the teacher over the internet using a web browser 24/7. Virtual front panels and a virtual breadboard displayed on the client PCs are used to control the physical equipment connected to the server. The server is an online workbench giving the students the impression that they are working in a real laboratory. Such a workbench supplements a local laboratory equipped with workbenches comprising oscilloscope, function generator, multi-meter, triple power supply, and a solderless breadboard. Apart from Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden, where the platform has been created two universities, University of Deusto in Spain and FH Campus Wien in Aus-tria, have already implemented replicas of the online workbench at BTH and use them in their regular education. Other universities are ready to start. It is easy for teachers to introduce their own existing laboratory exercises. A modem connection and a web browser with Flash player are sufficient for the student. The software required to set up such a workbench has been published under a GNU GPL licence. Apart from a standard PC the hardware required to join the VISIR Com-munity and implement an online workbench is a PXI chassis containing instruments and a switching matrix for circuit wiring. The components to be used by the students are to be provided by the teachers and are installed in the matrix. Universities, schools and other teaching organizations are invited to participate and open their local laboratories for remote access in order to be able to produce engineers with a solid and documented laboratory experience but without significantly increased cost per student. This tutorial is divided into four parts: • a general overview of the platform and its performance from the perspectives of the student and the teacher and a presentation of how University of Deusto in Spain uses their VISIR workbench • a mouse-cursor-on session, where the participants are invited to perform ex-periments using their laptops. Only WLAN and Flash Player are required. • course administration • how to provide components for remote users and how to avoid damage of ex-perimental equipment

  • 24. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Lagö, Thomas L
    On physical experiments and individual assessment of laboratory work in engineering education2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is obvious that our society needs more engineers. It is also true that mankind must live in symbiosis with nature and focus on sustainability and understanding. Thus, engineers must be able to design products and services which are in line with the principles of nature and the only way to become familiar with these principles is to perform many physical experiments. A way to use instructional laboratories more effectively and offer more hours in the laboratories for students without significant increased cost per student is opening them for remote access. Hands-on experiments are indispensable but remote mouse-cursor-on ones can supplement them. The VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) Open Laboratory Platform offers an open standard for online workbenches enabling students not only to perform physical experiments 24/7 but also to practice laboratory work. Learning objectives of laboratory work, free access to laboratory resources, and individual assessment of such work should be important key elements in an education delivering engineers with a solid documented laboratory experience.

  • 25. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Lagö, Thomas L
    The VISIR Open Lab Platform2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The VISIR Open Lab Platform is a client/server application enabling learners to perform physical electrical experiments over the Internet using a web browser. Virtual front panels and a virtual breadboard displayed on the client PCs are used to control the physical equipment giving the learners the impression that they are working in a real laboratory.

  • 26.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Alves, G.R.
    Fidalgo, A.V.
    Claesson, L.
    Zubia, J.G.
    Jayo, U.H.
    Castro, M.
    Diaz Orueta, G.
    Loro, F.G.
    Lab sessions in VISIR laboratories2016In: Proceedings of 2016 13th International Conference on Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation, REV 2016, IEEE Press, 2016, p. 350-352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental activities with real components are an essential part of all courses including or devoted to electrical and electronic circuits theory and practice. The knowledge triangle composed of hand-written exercises, simulations and traditional lab experiments has been enriched with the possibility for students to conduct real experiments over the Internet, using remote labs. This tutorial is devoted to one such remote lab named Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR). The Global Online Laboratory Consortium (GOLC) elected VISIR as the best remote controlled laboratory in the world, at the first time this distinction was awarded. At the end of this tutorial, attendees are expected to know what is VISIR, what can (not) be done with it, who is currently using it, and how can one integrate it in a given course curriculum.

  • 27.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Garcia-Zubia, J.
    Hernandez-Jayo, U.
    Nedic, Z
    Göl, Ö.
    MacHotka, J.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    On objectives of instructional laboratories, individual assessment, and use of collaborative remote laboratories2009In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, ISSN 1939-1382, E-ISSN 1939-1382, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three key issues should be addressed to enable universities to deliver engineers who have a solid documented laboratory experience enabling them to design goods and services complying with the requirements of a sustainable society. First, introduce learning objectives of engineering instructional laboratories in courses including laboratory components. Second, implement individual student assessment. Third, introduce free access to online experimental resources as a supplement to the equipment in traditional laboratories. Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Sweden and the University of South Australia (UniSA) have created online laboratory workbenches for electrical experiments that mimic traditional ones by combining virtual and physical reality. Online workbenches not only supplement traditional ones, but they can also be used for low-cost individual assessment. BTH has started a project disseminating the BTH workbench concept, The Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR) Open Laboratory Platform, and invites other universities to set up replicas and participate in further development and standardization. Further, online workbenches offer additional learning possibilities. UniSA has started a project where students located in different countries can perform experiments together as a way to enhance the participants' intercultural competence. This paper discusses online laboratory workbenches and their role in an engineering education appropriate for a sustainable society.

  • 28. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Norlin, Börje
    A Flexible Circuit Analysis Course2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) and Mid Sweden University offer a flexible circuit analysis course for Initial Professional Development and Continuing Engineering Education. The course material is used on campus. A combination of synchronous and asynchronous distance learning activities is used. Asynchronous video presentations, on-line classes and on-line laboratory sessions are provided. This paper presents the course, its aims and components and discusses relevant implementation details.

  • 29. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Olsson, Thomas
    Åkesson, Henrik
    Håkansson, Lars
    A Remote Electronics Laboratory for Physical Experiments using Virtual Breadboards2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In traditional university laboratories students conduct experiments under the supervision of an instructor. A remotely-operated laboratory for undergraduate education in electrical engineering which emulates a traditional laboratory has been set up by Blekinge Institute of Technology (hereafter referred to as BTH), Ronneby, Sweden. The laboratory is a client/server application and the Internet is used as the communication infrastructure. Most remote laboratories elsewhere are used for fixed experiments but in the BTH laboratory students around the world can assemble circuits simultaneously from electronic components in much the same way as they do in a traditional laboratory. The teacher or a member of the laboratory staff mounts the components to be used in the lab sessions in a circuit assembly robot in the experiment server in Ronneby. Students use the mouse to connect some of the corresponding virtual components on a virtual breadboard displayed on the client PC. Students thus control the robot by means of the wiring on the virtual breadboard. Virtual instrument front panels are used to control and read the instruments by means of remote control. To avoid potentially serious student mistakes e.g. overloading a component the teacher can preset limits to the source voltages which are accessible to students. The teacher can also restrict student circuits by, for example, dictating minimum impedance in loops created with aid of the components provided. The number of nodes provided on the virtual breadboard is adequate for experiments in undergraduate education. The laboratory is always open and can be used by registered students and guest users alike. The time-sharing scheme used allows simultaneous access for up to 8 client PCs. A 56 kbit/s modem and MS Internet Explorer are all that are required. The client software can be downloaded from the laboratory web site at http://distanslabserver.its.bth.se/. This paper discusses the remotely operated laboratory at BTH; it focuses on the virtual breadboard.

  • 30. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Håkansson, Lars
    Lagö, Thomas L
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Gör ingenjörsutbildningen attraktiv genom att öka det experimentella inslaget2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Många idéer till hur man skall få fler ungdomar att välja ingenjörsyrket har diskuterats och provats men tyvärr utan större framgång. En ny ingrediens kan vara att öka det experimentella inslaget, något som ändå måste göras av andra skäl, varav ett är hållbar utveckling. Det är känt att genom experiment kan man lära känna naturens principer. Ingenjörer är de yrkesutövare som konstruerar många av de nyttigheter som bär upp vår civilisation. Vi använder teorier/modeller som verktyg, men dessa räcker inte alltid, utan man måste få experimentera och bygga prototyper samt verifiera. Den allmänna meningen bland lärare och andra initierade bedömare har hittills varit att laborationer är nödvändiga men lite sägs om vad de förväntas ge. Få lärosäten producerar ingenjörer med dokumenterad erfarenhet av laborativt arbete. Lärandemål för laborationer har saknats men de senaste åren har sådana börjat definieras. Under senare decennier har undervisningsanslagen heller inte räknats upp i takt med studenttillströmningen. Eftersom laborativ undervisning är kostsam per student har lärosätena valt att reducera antalet laborationer, men Internets intåg ger nya möjligheter att öppna laboratorier för fjärrstyrning och låta studenter experimentera själva, utan risk att skada sig själva eller utrustningen. Studenter får således nya möjligheter att organisera sina studier i enlighet med vad Bolognaprocessen kräver och lärosäten kan utnyttja laboratorierna mera effektivt. Vi kan öka det experimentella inslaget i undervisningen. Internationellt samarbete både avseende läromedel och experimentell utrustning ser ut att ge möjlighet att sänka de löpande kostnaderna till den grad att det experimentella inslaget kan ökas väsentligt inom befintliga anslagsramar, även om den initiala kostnaden för den forskning som först krävs då inte är inräknad. Avdelningen för signalbehandling, ASB, vid BTH har öppnat övningslaboratorier för ellära och mekaniska vibrationsexperiment för fjärrstyrning. Båda används i reguljär undervisning sedan några år. Ett unikt användargränssnitt gör det möjligt att från valfriplats styra och manövrera experimentutrustning på samma sätt som i laboratorielokalerna. Studenterna får möjlighet att i förväg bekanta sig med instrumenten och utföra föreskrivna experiment enskilt eller tillsammans med andra. Dessa öppna laboratorier ger möjlighet att inkludera praktiska uppgifter i skriftliga tentamina, förutsatt att examination kan ske i datorsal, varvid erfarenhet av laborativt arbete enkelt kan examineras för varje enskild student. ASB har startat ett projekt VISIR (Virtual Systems in Reality) som handlar om att sprida BTH:s öppna laboratoriekoncept och formulera standarder inom området. Tillhörande programvara har publicerats som öppen källkod. BTH bjuder in andra lärosäten att delta i projektet och i dess vidareutveckling mot internationella standarder. Två internationella universitet har redan öppnat kopior av elläralaboratoriet och deltar aktivt i vidareutvecklingen. ASB har nyligen blivit inbjuden av ett universitet i Australien att delta ett projekt med titeln ”Enriching Student Learning Experience through International Collaboration in Remote Laboratories”. Detta beviljade projekt är ett resultat av nya pedagogiska möjligheter, som diskuteras i detta bidrag. ASB söker samarbete med pedagoger och andra forskare intresserade av experimentella inslag i ingenjörsutbildningen. Lärandemål för laborativt arbete, öppna laboratorier och internationellt samarbete kan bli ingredienser i en moderniserad och attraktiv ingenjörsutbildning.

  • 31. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Bartunek, Josef Ström
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Håkansson, Lars
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Lagö, Thomas L
    Telemanipulator for Remote Wiring of Electrical Circuits2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, students want extended access to learning resources and increased freedom to organize their learning activities. Remote access to laboratories enables students to perform physical experiments on their own 24/7. It is easy to control most electronic instruments remotely but some kind of telemanipulator is often required. The Signal Processing Department (ASB) at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) has created an online lab workbench for electrical experiments, mimicking and supplementing workbenches in local laboratories. Students being at home can, for example, use the online workbench in order to prepare themselves for supervised lab sessions and/or participate in such sessions taking place in a local laboratory. A virtual breadboard is used to control a telemanipulator (switching matrix) performing the circuit wiring. Together with virtual front panels depicting the front panels of the desktop instruments, it gives distant students the impression that they are working in a real laboratory. This paper describes the virtual breadboard and switching matrix combination, which can be used in many switching applications.

  • 32. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Bartunek, Josef Ström
    Åkesson, Henrik
    Håkansson, Lars
    Lagö, Thomas L
    An Instructional Electronics Laboratory Opened for Remote Operation and Control2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden has opened a local instructional laboratory for undergraduate education in electrical and electronic engineering for remote operation and control 24/7 as a complement and a supplement to traditional laboratories. It is equipped with a unique virtual interface enabling students to recognize on their own computer screen the desktop instruments and the breadboard most of them have already used in the local laboratory. The open laboratory is used in regular courses in circuit analysis for distant learning students dispersed all over Sweden and for campus students as well. The research is focused on what is perceived to be the greatest challenge, to give students laboratory experience that is as genuine as possible despite the lack of direct contact with the actual lab hardware. The goal is to produce an open international standard in cooperation with universities and other organizations around the world.

  • 33. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Håkansson, Lars
    Distributed Laboratories Based on Open Source Technologies2007In: 2007-07-23 / [ed] Garcia-Zubia, L. Gomes and J., Bilbao: University of Deusto , 2007, p. 247-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the general principles of remote laboratories. It focuses on the experimental and hardware aspects of the innovation. Access methods, protocols, and new web technologies such as Web 2.0 have been covered elsewhere. A remote laboratory project was started in 1999 at Blekinge Institute of Technology (hereafter referred to as BTH) in Sweden to ascertain if it is feasible to design a remote electronics laboratory which could function as a supplement to local instructional laboratories and provide students with free access to experimental equipment. Today, there are two laboratories online, one for electronics and one for signal processing. These are used as examples in the ensuing discussion. The BTH Open Laboratory concept evolved over a number of years. Its object is to add a remote operation option to traditional instructional laboratories thereby making the latter more accessible. This option is equipped with a unique interface enabling students to recognize on their own computer screen the instruments and other equipment which most of them have used in the local laboratory. The research is focused on what is considered to be the greatest challenge in engineering education today, i.e. to give students a laboratory experience that is as genuine as possible without direct contact with the actual lab hardware while at the same time allowing teachers to use standard equipment and readily available learning material. The winners are not only students and teachers, but also universities, which will be able to share distributed laboratories. Finally, the chapter presents some ideas about standards for primarily distributed electronics laboratories based on IVI (Interchangeable Virtual Instruments).

  • 34. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Håkansson, Lars
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Lagö, Thomas L
    The VISIR project – an Open Source Software Initiative for Distributed Online Laboratories2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Sweden has started a project known as VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) together with National Instruments in USA and Axiom EduTech in Sweden to disseminate an online laboratory concept created at BTH using open source technologies in collaboration with other universities and organizations. The concept is about adding a remote operation option to traditional instructional laboratories to make them more accessible, irrespective of whether the students are on campus or mainly off campus. The BTH option is equipped with a unique interface enabling students to recognize on their own computer screen the instruments and other equipment most of them have previously used in the local laboratory. The first remote control option implemented is for an electronics laboratory and the second one is for a signal processing laboratory with emphasis on mechanical vibration experiments. The electronics lab option features remote circuit wiring using a virtual breadboard and a relay switching matrix combination. The goal is an international standard, enabling teams worldwide to expand and develop jointly this powerful approach into distributed online laboratories by using standardized software such as IVI (Interchangeable Virtual Instruments) and equipment platforms such as PXI (PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation) and LXI (LAN eXtensions for Instrumentation).

  • 35.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Lundberg, Jenny
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    VISIR work in progress2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) Open Lab Platform is an architecture that enable universities, secondary schools, and other organizations to open instructional laboratories for remote access with preserved context. VISIR emanates from a feasibility study made in 1999 at BTH (Blekinge Institute of Technology) in Sweden. Today, VISIR laboratories are online at seven universities globally where thousands of students can work and conduct most experiments that can be performed on a solderless breadboard remotely without any risk of being harmed. IAOE (International Association of Online Engineering has organized SIG VISIR a Special Interest Group for VISIR. Further development of the platform is carried out in this Community. This paper is about work in progress especially at BTH.

  • 36. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Garcia-Zubia, Javier
    Håkansson, Lars
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Lagö, Thomas L
    A Flexible Instructional Electronics Laboratory with Local and Remote Lab Workbenches in a Grid2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Signal Processing Department (ASB) at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) has created two online lab workbenches, one for electrical experiments and one for mechanical vibration experiments, mimicking and supplementing workbenches in traditional labo-ratories. Since some years, the workbenches are used concurrently with on-site ones in regular supervised lab sessions. The students are also free to use them on their own around the clock e.g. for preparation. The electronic workbench can be used simultane-ously by many students. The aim of a project known as VISIR (Virtual Systems in Reality) founded by ASB at the end of 2006, is disseminating the online lab workbenches using open source technologies. The goal is to create a template for a grid laboratory where the nodes are workbenches for electrical ex-periments, located at different universities. This paper focuses on standards, pedagogical aspects, and measurement procedure requirements.

  • 37. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Garcia-Zubia, Javier
    Håkansson, Lars
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Lagö, Thomas L
    A Flexible Instructional Electronics Laboratory with Local and Remote Lab Workbenches in a Grid2008In: International Journal of Online Engineering, ISSN 1868-1646, E-ISSN 1861-2121, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Signal Processing Department (ASB) at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) has created two online lab workbenches; one for electrical experiments and one for mechanical vibration experiments, mimicking and supplementing workbenches in traditional laboratories. For several years now, the workbenches have been used concurrently with on-site ones in regular, supervised lab sessions. The students are encouraged to use them on a 24/7 basis for example, in preparation for supervised sessions. The electronic workbench can be used simultaneously by many students. The aim of a project known as VISIR (Virtual Systems in Reality) founded by ASB at the end of 2006, is to disseminate the online lab workbenches using open source technologies. The goal is to create a template for a grid laboratory where the nodes are workbenches for electrical experiments, located at different universities. This paper focuses on standards, pedagogical aspects, and measurement procedure requirements.

  • 38. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Olsson, Thomas
    Traditional Lab Sessions in a Remote Laboratory for Circuit Analysis2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional lab sessions are performed in many local university laboratories. Emulating a local laboratory, a remote laboratory for courses in circuit analysis and electronics has been set up at Blekinge Institute of Technology in Ronneby, Sweden. Students in different places around the globe can participate in lab sessions in which up to eight client PCs can be connected simultaneously to an experiment server via the Internet; students can also perform experiments individually and around the clock whenever the server is not fully occupied. Universities or other teaching organizations which make use of the laboratory for teaching purposes can use learning material in the language of their choice. The laboratory is always open and can be used by guest users outside regular lab sessions. The address of the web site is: http://distanslabserver.its.bth.se/.

  • 39. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Åkesson, Henrik
    Håkansson, Lars
    A Flexible Remote Electronics Laboratory2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet provides new possibilities for universities and other teaching organizations to share laboratories equipped with expensive instruments. A remotely operated electronics laboratory has been set up by Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden. The laboratory is a client/server application and the Internet is used as the communication infrastructure. In the new version presented in this paper security problems are solved and an authentic appearance of instruments and components are provided. Most remote electronics laboratories elsewhere offer fixed experiments but in this one, students can simultaneously assemble circuits and conduct experiments much like they do in a traditional university laboratory. The laboratory is always open and can be used by registered students and guest users around the world.

  • 40. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Åkesson, Henrik
    Håkansson, Lars
    Experimentera hemma med utrustningen i universitetens övningslaboratorier2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, BTH, har öppnat ett övningslaboratorium för ellära och elektronik för fjärrstyrning och håller på att öppna ett fjärrstyrbart signalbehandlingslaboratorium för vibrationsanalys. Ett unikt användargränssnitt gör det möjligt att från valfri plats styra och manövrera experimentutrustningen på samma sätt som i laboratorielokalerna. Allt som behövs är Internetansluten PC med standardprogramvara. Denna forskning är inriktad mot vad som upplevs som den största utmaningen dvs. att ge studenterna en så genuin upplevelse som möjligt oaktat bristen på direkt kontakt med den fysikiska experimentutrustningen. BTH bjuder in andra lärosäten både nationellt och internationellt att delta i pedagogisk utvärdering av detta komplement till att experimentera i laboratoriesal och att delta i vidareutvecklingen mot en internationell standard.

  • 41. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Åkesson, Henrik
    Håkansson, Lars
    Claesson, Ingvar
    Lagö, Thomas L
    Remote Operation and Control of Traditional Laboratory Equipment2006In: International Journal of Online Engineering, ISSN 1868-1646, E-ISSN 1861-2121, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical experiments are indispensable for developing skills to deal with physical processes and instrumentation. The Internet provides new possibilities for universities and other teaching organizations to share laboratories and increase the number of lab sessions without incurring any increase in cost. Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden has opened a traditional electronics laboratory for remote operation and control 24/7; it is the first of its kind. The laboratory is equipped with a unique virtual interface enabling students to recognize on their own computer screen the desktop instruments and the breadboard they have already used in the local laboratory. The research is focused on what is perceived to be the greatest challenge, i.e. to give the student laboratory experience that is as genuine as possible despite the lack of direct contact with the actual lab hardware at the same time as it allows the teacher to use existing equipment and teaching material. The goal is to produce an open international standard.

  • 42. Gustavsson, Ingvar
    et al.
    Åkesson, Henrik
    A Remote Laboratory providing Teacher-defined Sessions2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An experiment server emulating a traditional university laboratory for courses in Circuit Analysis and Electronics has been set up at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) in Ronneby, Sweden. Students in different places around the globe can participate in lab sessions allowing up to eight client PCs to be connected to the server via the Internet simultaneously or they can perform experiments alone without supervision around the clock when the laboratory is not fully occupied. Regular sessions are supervised by one instructor using MS Netmeeting or other means of communication. The laboratory pro-vides common instruments and the user interface is in English but universities or other learning organizations engaging the laboratory for their courses can use lab instruction manuals and other learning material in a language of their choice. In a traditional labora-tory the students use a breadboard and components handed over by the instructor to form the circuits assigned and connect the test probes. In the remote laboratory a virtual breadboard and photographs of the components provided in each session are displayed on the client PC screen at startup. The students use the mouse to locate each virtual component on the breadboard and do the wiring to assemble the circuits. The teacher or someone in the laboratory staff mounts the corresponding real components in sockets in a switching matrix in Ronneby controlled by the virtual breadboard routine before the session. The instruments provided are computer-based and have virtual front panels. The time sharing scheme used to allow simultaneous access to one server imposes re-strictions on the time period allowed for each experiment but in courses in electronics the time constants involved can without any inconvenience be selected within a proper range. The number of nodes on the virtual breadboard is also limited due to the hard-ware complexity of the switching matrix but is adequate for experiments in undergradu-ate education. Apart from the fact that each student or student team is working in a vir-tual environment without face to face contact with the instructor or other students in the laboratory the only difference compared to a traditional lab session is that it is not pos-sible for a student to manipulate the components and the wires with their fingers. The laboratory is always open and can be used by everybody outside regular lab sessions. Only a 56 kbit/s modem and MS Internet Explorer are required. The client software can be downloaded from the laboratory web site. The address of the homepage of the ex-periment server is: http://distanslabserver.its.bth.se/. In this paper laboratory sessions in the remote laboratory will be compared with sessions in a traditional laboratory.

  • 43.
    Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Muthusamy, Dinesh
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Ahmad, Wasim
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Remotely controlled laboratory setup for Active Noise Control and acoustic experiments2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a remotely controlled educational experiments setup for Active Noise Control (ANC) and acoustic experiments. The experiments setup is based on the Virtual Instruments Systems in Reality (VISIR) open source platform, National Instruments LabVIEW software and a Digital Signal Processor TMS320C6713 from Texas Instruments. The software development and equipment are controlled remotely form a client PC using a standard web browser. The proposed laboratory setup focuses on ANC experiments applied to noise in a ventilation duct. The laboratory setup will enable students to test and investigate properties and behaviour of adaptive algorithms in reality as compared to more confined simulations usually carried out in Matlab etc. The general steps in ANC, such as the feasibility of active control, designing, testing and debugging ANC algorithms, configuration and implementation of an active control system, are all covered. In addition students will be able to study the effect of analog to digital converters (ADC), anti-aliasing filters, digital to analog converters (DAC) and reconstruction filters using digital signal processing in reality, etc. The laboratory setup is suitable for a wide range of courses such as sound related experiments in upper secondary school physics, digital signal processing, adaptive signal processing, and acoustics at university level.

  • 44.
    khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Muthusamy, Dineshkumar
    Ahmad, Waqas
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Remotely Controlled Laboratory Setup for Active Noise Control and Acoustic Experiments2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a remotely controlled educational experiments setup for Active Noise Control (ANC) and acoustic experiments. The experiments setup is based on the Virtual Instruments Systems in Reality (VISIR) open source platform, National Instruments LabVIEW software and a Digital Signal Processor TMS320C6713 from Texas Instruments. The software development and equipment are controlled remotely form a client PC using a standard web browser. The proposed laboratory setup focuses on ANC experiments applied to noise in a ventilation duct. The laboratory setup will enable students to test and investigate properties and behaviour of adaptive algorithms in reality as compared to more confined simulations usually carried out in Matlab etc. The general steps in ANC, such as the feasibility of active control, designing, testing and debugging ANC algorithms, configuration and implementation of an active control system, are all covered. In addition students will be able to study the effect of analog to digital converters (ADC), anti-aliasing filters, digital to analog converters (DAC) and reconstruction filters using digital signal processing in reality, etc. The laboratory setup is suitable for a wide range of courses such as sound related experiments in upper secondary school physics, digital signal processing, adaptive signal processing, and acoustics at university level.

  • 45.
    khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Muthusamy, Dineshkumar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Ahmad, Waqas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Johansson, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Remotely Controlled Active Noise Control Laboratories2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remotely controlled laboratories in educational institutions are gaining popularity at an exponential rate due to the multidimensional benefits they provide. The Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR) project by Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) Sweden has successfully implemented remotely controlled laboratories, with remotely controlled real instruments and experimental setups. Currently these laboratories provide students the opportunity to conduct experiments in the field of electronics, antenna theory and mechanical vibration measurements. In this paper a prototype system of a remotely controlled laboratory for active noise control (ANC) is introduced. The proposed lab will focus on addressing the problem of a ventilation duct noise. The laboratory is informative and to a great extent introduces a student to the general steps in ANC when it is suggested as a plausible solution for a noise problem. The student can perform an investigation concerning feasibility of active control, design, configuration and implementation of an active control system. The laboratory is based on a modern and relevant DSP platform with the corresponding software development environment controlled remotely. In addition, it may be utilized remotely both for lab assignments in acoustics courses and digital signal processing courses.

  • 46.
    Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Muthusamy, Dineshkumar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Ahmad, Waqas
    Sällberg, Benny
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Performing active noise control and acoustic experiments remotely2012In: International Journal of Online Engineering, ISSN 1868-1646, E-ISSN 1861-2121, Vol. 8, no special issue 2, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel and advanced remotely controlled laboratory for conducting Active Noise Control (ANC), acoustic and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) experiments. The laboratory facility, recently developed by Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) Sweden, supports remote learning through internet covering beginners level such as simple experimental measurements to advanced users and even researchers such as algorithm development and their performance evaluation on DSP. The required software development for ANC algorithms and equipment control are carried out anywhere in the world remotely from an internet-connected client PC using a standard web browser. The paper describes in detail how ANC, acoustic and DSP experiments can be performed remotely The necessary steps involved in an ANC experiment such as validity of ANC, forward path estimation and active control applied to a broad band random noise [0-200Hz] in a ventilation duct will be described in detail. The limitations and challenges such as the forward path and nonlinearities pertinent to the remote laboratory setup will be described for the guidance of the user. Based on the acoustic properties of the ventilation duct some of the possible acoustic experiments such as mode shapes analysis and standing waves analysis etc. will also be discussed in the paper.

  • 47.
    Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Zmuda, M.
    Konopka, P.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Håkansson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Enhancement of remotely controlled laboratory for Active Noise Control and acoustic experiments2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest important developments in the remotely controlled Active Noise Control (ANC) and Acoustics laboratory at Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden, are introduced. The remotely controlled laboratory is based on the Virtual Instruments Systems in Reality (VISIR) concept, and concerns multi-channel measurement and control of the sound field in a heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) duct. Originally the ventilation duct was equipped with a fixed number of microphones at fixed spatial locations in the duct. A microphone positioning system has been designed and implemented. It enables control of the spatial positions of a number of microphones inside the HVAC duct using a suitable web interface for controlling stepper motors via a National Instruments (NI) PXI system. With the new developments, the spatial number of selectable positions for the microphones have been extended substantially. The new microphone positioning control system is presented and to enhance the user interaction with the laboratory equipment, an audio and visual system is also proposed.

  • 48. Lima, N.
    et al.
    Alves, G.
    Viegas, C.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Combined efforts to develop students experimental competences2015In: exp.at 2015 - 3rd Experiment International Conference: Online Experimentation, IEEE Press, 2015, p. 243-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students experimental competences are of most importance in engineering courses. However in post-Bologna courses, the number of contact hours and the actual extent of hands-on lab work were substantially reduced. Online resources usage (simulators and remote labs) has been growing up in the last decades, as more complex and versatile tools are being developed. Unfortunately, several of these usages reported in literature do not show the didactical backing that support these implementations. This work is a step forward, explaining how a teacher implemented a combination of online resources in order to develop experimental competences. The results show significant correlations between students’ usage of these resources and their calculus competences and final achievements.

  • 49.
    Lima, Natercia
    et al.
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Viegas, Maria Clara
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Zannin, Marcelo
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Marques, Arcelina
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Alves, Gustavo
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Felgueiras, Carlos
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Costa, Ricardo
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Fidalgo, André
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Marchisio, Susana
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Lerro, Federico
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG .
    Merendino, Claudio
    Universidad Nacional de Rosario, ARG.
    Da Silva, Juarez
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Pozzo, Maria Isabel
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Dobboletta, Elsa
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Nilsson, Kristian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Garcia-Peñalvo, Francisco
    Universidad de Salamanca, ESP.
    Do students really understand the difference between simulation and remote labs?2017In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory experiments play a crucial role in engineering education as they strongly contribute to the development of important skills for the professional practice. This paper addresses a students' understanding gap between simulations and remote labs. These two resources (and namely the remote laboratory VISIR - Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality) have been commonly used on several didactical implementations, along with other didactical resources in different Engineering degrees at the Federal University of Santa Catarina and Polytechnic of Porto School of Engineering. This work, developed in the scope of the VISIR+ Project, intends to evaluate students' perceptions considering simulation and remote lab results. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to better understand how deeply students realize the differences between these resources and their type of data. Preliminary results indicate that a considerable number of student's don't have a clear idea of these differences, even though sometimes they know their definition. Furthermore, this gap does not seem to differ much with the context (country, course, academic year, course content), students' final grades, teacher approach or implemented tasks. © 2017 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 50.
    Lima, Natercia
    et al.
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Zannin, Marcelo
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Viegas, Clara
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Marques, Arcelina
    IPP, Felgueiras, PRT.
    Alves, Gustavo
    IPP, Felgueiras, PRT.
    Felgueiras, Carlos
    Research Centre in Industrial Technology and Engineering (CIETI), PRT.
    Costa, Ricardo
    Instituto Politcnico do Porto, School of Engineering (ISEP), PRT.
    Fidalgo, André
    IPP, Felgueiras, PRT.
    Da Silva, Juarez
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, BRA.
    Pozzo, Maria Isabel
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Dobboletta, Elsa
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, ARG.
    Gustavsson, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Signal Processing.
    Garcia-Peñalvo, Francisco
    Universidad de Salamanca, ESP.
    The VISIR+ project-helping contextualize math in an engineering course2017In: Proceedings of 2017 4th Experiment at International Conference: Online Experimentation, exp.at 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 7-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The long-term goal of engineering education is to prepare students to work as engineers. Being a practical profession, laboratories play a crucial role in illustrating concepts and principles as well as improving technical skills. In the last decades the use of online resources (simulators and remote labs) has been growing, either as a complementary and/or as an alternative way of developing experimental competences. In the scope of the VISIR+ Project, this work presents the first results of a didactical implementation using simultaneously the remote laboratory VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality), simulation and calculus in a Math Course at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC). The preliminary results indicate that the use of several resources increases students' performance, boosting their learning and competence development. © 2017 IEEE.

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