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  • 1. Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Knowledge sharing across boundaries - Web 2.0 and product-service system development2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest among product development organizations to capitalize on engineering knowledge as their core competitive advantage for innovation. Capturing, storing, retrieval, sharing and reusing of engineering knowledge from a wide range of enterprise memory systems have become crucial activities of knowledge management practice in competitive organizations. In light of a changing and dynamic enterprise definition, including a move towards Product-Service System (PSS) development, this paper discusses some of the limitations of current enterprise systems in reusing engineering knowledge across functional and corporate boundaries. Further, the paper illustrates how Web 2.0-based collaborative technologies can leverage cross-functional knowledge for new PSS development projects through an open, bottom-up, and collective sense-making approach to knowledge management.

  • 2. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology,.
    Expanding the social dimension - Towards a knowledge base for product-service innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extension of businesses to incorporate the provision of function as a service in supplement to standalone products is an ongoing movement in manufacturing industry. In short, this means that the development intent should be guided by the need of ‘performance in use’ that the customer wants, e.g. thrust rather than an engine. By this, the established knowledge base challenges the development team. This paper embarks from the assumption that there are three main challenges, i.e. (1) innovation activities, (2) customer data acquisition and (3) the transformation of data into design information. The purpose is to discuss knowledge sharing activities to contribute to product-service innovation. In this study it has been found that contemporary data acquisition activities filter out important dimensions of knowledge. Thus, does not provide a sound base for service provisions.

  • 3. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    In search of what is missing - needfinding the SIRIUS way2007In: Proceedings of the 4th IASTED International Conference on Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Engineering, KSCE 2006, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands: ACTA Press , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Listen closely to your customers, and you are more likely to design products that actually meet or even exceed their needs.”: Such statements have come to dominate company innovation strategies in the last decade, but in reality involving customers in product development is not as straightforward as it sounds. Customers, it is becoming clear, cannot always express their needs adequately. Especially, in the case of innovative products where the starting position by definition includes no existing solution, applying a user-orientated approach is paramount. We argue that techniques for ‘needfinding’ must be the point of departure. This has importance both in terms of methodological issues – how to find customer needs? – and for organizational work – who should be engaged in finding customer needs? In our view, engineers must be involved in identifying and understanding those needs. We have learnt through a series of studies, that structured needfinding by engineers during the earliest phases of product development could better support the process of identifying needs and thereby guide design projects. In this way, two basic problems are overcome. Firstly, identifying needs which are otherwise difficult to articulate becomes possible. Secondly, translation difficulties between customers and engineers are eradicated

  • 4. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Madelene
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Need driven product development in team-based projects2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, practical activities of Needfinding - an intertwined approach to identifying needs and to visualizing idea concepts in early design - are described and discussed. This is done primarily to gain an increased understanding of the various representations of user needs that are fed into the fuzzy front-end activities of team-based product innovation projects. The empirical basis comes from a study of an eight-month collaborative product development project, performed under realistic conditions by MSc students in close collaboration with their client. Focusing closely on customers and their needs is encouraged within the conceptual framework of Integrated Product Development and is increasingly highlighted as a key enabler in the design of truly innovative products. Despite the fact that identified customer needs are considered as the initial and primary input into such an innovation process, it can be argued that the design teams do not commonly have a sufficient understanding of customer needs and they do not normally interact with customers in their environment. Besides focusing on measurable aspects of user behaviour and requirements, a traditional approach to identifying and managing customer needs usually includes several interpretive stages before being handed over to the design team. In the context of innovative products, the identification and definition of customers and their needs is a non-trivial and difficult exercise. It involves, we suggest, not only Needfinding but also the definition of ‘those who might need the product’, users and customers to co-evolve iteratively in the early phases of design.

  • 5.
    Frank, Martin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Volvo Construction Equipment AB.
    Ruvald, Ryan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Johansson, Christian M.
    NODA Intelligent Systems AB, SWE.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Towards autonomous construction equipment: supporting on-site collaboration between automatons and humans2019In: International Journal of Product Development, ISSN 1477-9056, E-ISSN 1741-8178, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 292-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support the application of automated machines andcollaborative robots in unstructured environments like in the mining,agriculture and construction sector the needs of the human co-workershould be investigated to ensure a safe and productive collaboration.The empirical study presented includes the prototyping of a solution forhuman-machine communication, which has been supported by a designthinking approach. An understanding of the human needs had beencreated through jobsite observations and semi-structured interviewswith human workforces working in close proximity to heavy mobileequipment. The results shows that trust and communication have a bigimpact on the jobsite collaboration.

  • 6. Hicks, Ben
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå Univerisity of Technology.
    Culley, Steve
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå Univerisity of Technology.
    A methodology for evaluating technology readiness during product development2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jagtap, Santosh
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Warell, Anders
    Lund University, SWE.
    Design For Resource-Limited Societies: Informational Behaviour Of Designers2017In: DS87-1 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 21ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 17), VOL 1: RESOURCE SENSITIVE DESIGN, DESIGN RESEARCH APPLICATIONS AND CASE STUDIES / [ed] aier, A; Skec, S; Kim, H; Kokkolaras, M; Oehmen, J; Fadel, G; Salustri, F; VanDerLoos, M, 2017, p. 21-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a sharp contrast between High Resource Settings (HRSs), commonly seen in developedcountries and Low Resource Settings (LRSs), typically found in the marginalised sections of societiesaround the world. Product design for LRSs is crucial to satisfy unmet or under-served needs of thepeople living in LRSs. Supporting designers to develop successful products for LRSs demandsdeveloping an in-depth understanding of their design process, including their informational behaviour.In this research, using think aloud protocol analysis, we compared the designers’ informationalbehaviour in designing products for LRSs and HRSs, where HRSs is considered a baseline. The findingsindicate that designing products for LRSs is more information intensive, and that it influences theinformational activities of designers, thus indicating potential impact of a resource-setting on the waydesigners deal with information.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Virtual Meeting Interoperability: Discussing the need of support for heterogeneous meeting environments2006In: Proceedings of the Fourth IASTED International Conference on Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Engineering / [ed] M. Boumedine, C. Touzet, 2006, Vol. 4, p. 92-97, article id 532-076Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more projects in today’s industry being global it is important to support the people collaborating in these projects. Travel is expensive and time consuming and is not viable in the long run. Although some travel is necessary it is important for people to meet virtually instead. In many cases it is difficult for companies to collaborate because they do not use the same tools for these virtual meetings. Due to restrictions with IT security it is also difficult and expensive to implement every new tool their partner companies use. One solution could be a portal that facilitates connecting users with different virtual meeting tools. Using Web Services to bridge the different protocols it would be possible to connect two software packages that are using different standards for virtual meetings. With a tool as this it would be possible for chosen companies to collaborate closely online although they have incompatible software packages. Companies can select their solutions on the basis of their needs and do not have to implement a new solution or modify their existing setup to accommodate new partner needs. Finally, people would only need to learn the one tool which is available in their own company.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Knowledge enabled engineering - knowledge lifecycle approach2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    VIVACE is an EC-funded integrated project that addresses aeronautics´ vision for the year 2020. More specifically VIVACE intends to achieve cost reduction and time reduction in new aircraft development. VIVACE consists of three sub-projects where the two first extracts problems from aircraft and engine industries respectively. The third sub-project collects these problems and develops advanced capabilities (methods, tools, guidelines, etc.). The ’Knowledge Enabled Engineering’ (KEE) work package in sub-project three focuses issues on concerns associated with knowledge within an extended enterprise. This includes both Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) issues, but also more general questions about engineering knowledge. The work starts in analysing requirements from use cases via finding existing solutions to conducting tests in the form of pilots. Finally the knowledge acquired is disseminated to both the aeronautics community and also to a wider audience in Europe and the rest of the world.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå Technical University.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå Technical University.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå Technical University.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Gated maturity assessment - Supporting Gate Review Decisions with Knowledge Maturity Assessment2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In aeronautics industry today, companies collaborate closely in virtual enterprises to develop products and solutions that are more integrated and more complex, and that aims to target larger responsibilities regarding the product life-cycle. On top of this, lead-time and development costs needs to be reduced.<br/>The 7 Day Proposal (7DP) is the conceptual name of a framework wherein a customized proposal is produced by a virtual enterprise consortium within seven days from a received request for proposal. This is substantially shorter than what is current practice today and implies that new methods, tools and ways of working are needed. Today, in offer processes, time is lost because of insufficient, or immature, available information and knowledge at gate reviews when decisions are due, causing time consuming iterations. <br/>The Gated Maturity Assessment (GMA) concept is intended to help reduce these costly iterations by targeting the ambiguity at these gate reviews in order to reduce the uncertainty in decision base. <br/>Other frameworks using maturity include Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM). TRL is an artefact-focused framework developed by NASA to assess space technology maturity. CMM is a process-focused framework for assessing organisations' software development process capability (maturity). <br/>The GMA is a concept for assessing the maturity of the knowledge that goes into a gate review (i.e. a decision document). The GMA is intended to support decision makers by assuring confidence in these decision points and thereby reducing the number of iterations, hereby reducing lead-time and increases the quality of the process.<br/>This paper reports on the development of the GMA concept from the 7DP use case, and also the development of a support tool intended for use in the 7DP process. <br/>Essentially, the 7DP process is a stage-gate process like many corporate product development processes with a number of decision gates. Therefore there is a future wish to move towards an engineering design context with this concept. <br/>The work is part of the 70 million € European project VIVACE where GMA is part of a Knowledge Enabled Engineering solution to the 7DP use case.

  • 11. Karlsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Isaksson, Ola
    Information driven collaborative engineering - enabing functional product innovation2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Information Driven Collaborative Engineering (IDCE) as an enabler of Functional Product Innovation (FPI). It discusses challenges that arise in functional product development and how distributed collaborative work will be affected. Finally the paper proposes bringing the domains of Distributed Collaborative Engineering (DCE) and Knowledge Enabled Engineering (KEE) together to form IDCE, in order to meet these challenges.

  • 12. Kastensson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Embracing risk to pursue product innovation in automotive industry2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A company’s ability to successfully introduce radically new products and services is a key success factor for sustaining competitive advantage. This is particularly true for the automotive industry, where smaller manufacturers with niche products struggle to compete with the large-scale efforts of their bigger competitors, and are thus in desperate need to innovate their way out of the current crisis. A key challenge for companies seeking innovation is how to better understand the role of risk in innovative practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate how managers within an automotive company perceive the concept of innovation and the relation between innovation and risk. The study is based on interviews with fifteen managers representing a cross-section of disciplines. The analysis of the informants’ answers resulted in two overarching themes, “novelty” and “value”, which were further broken down into seven sub-themes to highlight different facets of innovation that were raised by managers from these disciplines. While there were many similarities in the perceptions, the most striking differences related to; 1) innovation as being about the “combination of things to something new”, and 2) innovation as being about increasing “customer value”. Several informants noted that risk taking is a success factor to achieve innovation, but they also acknowledged that there are several inhibiting factors that are in contradiction with this approach, such as limited time and money. Further the paper has highlighted the crucial challenge of how to effectively balance risk and opportunity to invest in long-term opportunities, without risking short-term growth.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå Technical University.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå Technical University.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Bertoni, Marco
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Engineering 2.0 - Exploring lightweight technologies for the virtual enterprise2010In: From CSCW to Web 2.0: European Developments in Collaborative Design, Springer , 2010, p. 173-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a traditional business partnership, the partner companies are under contractual obligation to share data, information, and knowledge through one or several information systems that the leading firm decides. In such a case, the issue of sharing "whatever needs to be shared" is settled in contracts before any action is taken, however, also giving the implications that sharing expertise becomes a heavy and time-consuming activity. In turn, it can be argued that the heavy administration affects the lead time of product development negatively since the necessary input flows are delayed. In addition, the adaptation to certain predefined collaborative information systems is both expensive and resource-consuming (e.g., educating staff to use them). Also, the system might not be adaptable to the existing internal technology structure, causing a "translation" procedure, again taking up resources. Another structure for collaboration is a network or alliance of independent partner companies. One motivation for a network structure is that the partners can join or leave it more easily. A reason for joining and staying is an implicit sense of knowledge sharing (Tomkins 2001) and access to a "win-win" environment. Furthermore, the partners can be linked by information technology, i.e., forming a virtual ­structure rather than a physical one. The technologies provide the channels with additional knowledge. In a best-case scenario, a company would get access to a wide range of useful competences, and in a worst-case scenario the company would be drained of its core competences. Accordingly, at least two considerations for joining a partner network can be considered. First, the resources needed to couple the technologies have to be reasonable, due to the underpinning logic of going in and out of more than one network. Second, the company has to identify its knowledge base and evaluate the prospective gains and losses of sharing its expertise.

  • 14.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå Technical University.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå Technical University.
    Randall, Dave
    Engineering 2.0 - Exploring Lightweight Technologies for the Virtual Enterprise2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a Virtual Enterprise setting, it becomes increasingly important to make sure that knowledge and expertise created in one discipline, domain or company is correctly understood and quickly utilized by other actors throughout the value chain. This paper discusses why lightweight technology seems like a particularly promising concept in this context, and why Virtual Enterprises could benefit from learning more about tag clouds, mashups, wikis, and other ‘lightweight' technologies, as complements to the large-scale, arguably ‘heavyweight', product life-cycle management (PLM) systems of current practice. The paper draws on data from a number of product development projects - ranging from the development of manufacturing tools and industrial drive systems, to aircraft engines and armored terrain vehicles. The paper identifies both the kinds of problem typically experienced in the Virtual Enterprise, in relation to knowledge sharing, and explores ways in which lightweight technology might be adapted to solve them.

  • 15.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bylund, Nicklas
    Isaksson, Ola
    Rethinking virtual teams for streamlined development2007In: Higher creativity for virtual teams - Developing Platforms for Co-Creation, Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference , 2007, p. 138-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from experiences in automotive and aerospace development, the authors argue that it is time to radically progress our current understanding of how creativity could be introduced in organizations where factors like legal demands and contractual agreements severely restrict ‘outside-the-box' thinking, and where well-known creativity enablers such as trust, shared goals, and shared culture are becoming increasingly difficult to accomplish. <br/>

  • 16.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Leifer, Larry
    Stanford University.
    Van der Loos, Machiel
    Stanford University.
    Feland, John
    Design for Wellbeing2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing need for engineering designers to engage in creative activities that result in innovative products and technologies for the benefit of society. However, from an engineering perspective, issues of ‘life quality’ are currently heavily under-prioritized, particularly with regard to people with disabilities. This paper argues that both needs and solutions are now part of the designer’s responsibility, and that it is crucial to make a qualitative assessment of both the potential market impact and the ‘quality of life’ improvements afforded by innovations. Design for Wellbeing offers a perspective on life quality that goes beyond the traditional scope of assistive technology in that it aims to help people make a transformation from an actual state of being to a desired state of being – regardless of ability level.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Intranet - Luleå University of Technology2001Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Division of Computer Aided Design has been announced as one of ten winners in the Intranet Design Annual, published by web guru Jakob Nielsen at Nielsen/Norman Group. In competition with over 50 nominated organizations, the division's Intranet, developed by Andreas Larsson, Tobias Larsson and Peter Törlind, reached the top ten. Nielsen has been called the "guru of webpage usability" by the New York Times, and he currently holds 60 U.S. Patents, most of them concerning web usability. The report states: “It is also notable that Luleå University of Technology made it to the top 10, despite being designed by a bunch of graduate students. Though small and lacking a lot of resources, this design team focused relentlessly on user needs and on simplifying their design through many fast iterations. Some of the Luleå features underwent up to 50 iterations before they reached their current usability level. ‘I thought my initial design for the calendar application was really easy to use - in fact, I was quite proud of it,’ says one of the developers. But, the design didn’t hold up when professors and other staff members used it, so it was changed. User needs triumphed over the designer’s initial pride. That’s the hallmark of a truly great designer. On a small budget, the way to achieve high-quality design is through fast, cheap iterations and a willingness to do what users need.”

  • 18.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    The Mobile intranet - Managing People and Information in a Distributed Organization2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of the increasing globalisation of organizations, information systems must deal with issues of mobility. Longer distances between the members can lead to a knowledge gap, which means that two groups of people working in the same organization work according to completely different bases of information. Thus, there is a need for the members of an organization to communicate efficiently across geographical and departmental boundaries. The paper discusses motives, methods and experiences from the participatory design of a versatile Intranet application currently in use at the Division of Computer Aided Design, Luleå University of Technology in Sweden.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Mabogunje, Ade
    Leifer, Larry
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Distributed team innovation - a framework for distributed product development2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the need for increased effectivity in global product development, the Polhem Laboratory at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden, and the Center for Design Research at Stanford University, USA, have created the concept of Distributed Team Innovation (DTI). The overall aim of the DTI framework is to decrease the negative impact of geographic distance on product development efforts and to further enhance current advantages of worldwide, multidisciplinary collaboration. The DTI framework uses a three-layered approach to the advancement of global collaboration; with product development, education, and research in dynamic and synergetic interaction. From our preliminary findings, we believe that the approach we have taken in the DTI initiative will make significant contributions to meet current challenges of distributed product development.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Design for wellbeing2008In: The Engineering Handbook of Smart Technology for Aging, Disability and Independence, Hoboken, N.J: Wiley , 2008, p. 819-832Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Web-based multibody dynamics using distributed simulation modules2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From being a specialized tool, used in only a few of the design stages, modeling and simulation has become a strategically and competitive tool the global manufacturing firm can’t do without in order to perform world class product development. Simulations have grown from being small isolated models treated at one geographic place to be multidisciplinary and incorporating whole product structures. This means that information, i.e. simulation models, might be located at departments across the entire organization, hence in the global organization across the world and the efforts to perform simulations will be complicated. A method, or tool, that use the Internet for sharing and incorporating modular Simulation models, within the framework of multibody dynamics, is proposed and developed in this work.

  • 22.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    A modular approach to web based multibody dynamic simulation2001In: / [ed] T. Kjellberg, Stockholm: Kungl. Tekniska Högskolan , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer-based tools for modelling and simulation have changed the best practise of product development. Simulation of mechanical dynamic systems have a large potential in product development but are only partly used today due to, for example, modelling complexity. A method, or tool, that supports distribution of multibody dynamic analysis models, in a modular way, is proposed and developed. Ethnographic methods have been used as a means for gaining an understanding of the engineering analysis work practice. The tool incorporates the engineering simulation packages ADAMS and MATLAB in a web based environment, and allows distributed multibody dynamic simulation in product development.

  • 23.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Distributed multibody dynamic analysis within product development2001In: Proceedings of the ASME 2001 Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference DETC'01, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, 2001, p. 501-507Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method that supports distribution of multibody dynamic analysis is proposed and developed. Ethnographic methods are used as a means for gaining a deeper understanding of the engineering analysis work practice, and the findings form the base for a cooperative design of the system. The concept of design rationale is applied in order to deal with current problems of engineering analysis, such as irrelevant input and output, as well as satisfying the need for useful, real-time feedback. The web based simulation environment, applied to vehicle system dynamics, contains the simulation packages ADAMS and MATLAB and incorporates database technology. The possibility to distribute simulation models and results, from simulation experts to design experts and engineers, as well as subcontractors, is created. The proposed method requires changes in the existing multibody dynamic simulation methodology regarding aspects of incorporation in product development theories

  • 24.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Kassfeldt, Elisabet
    Innovations for Life - Design for Wellbeing2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design for Wellbeing (DfW) will enable persons with disabilities to influence their everyday living conditions through active participation in the design of the assistive devices they use in their daily lives. One objective is to enhance the wellbeing of persons with disabilities by using their descriptions of needs in relation to assistive devices as a starting point for product development. We aim to give users an active role in developing their own assistive devices by allowing people from various disciplines to work with them in a product development team, to improve the wellbeing of persons with disabilities, and to develop product development methodology with respect to a more empowered user role in product innovation processes. This paper reports on the fundamental concept of DfW, but also on two nine-month student projects, CRE[ATIVO]2 and INTELiCare, that have been carried out as joint efforts between Luleå University of Technology, the Royal Institute of Technology and Stanford University.

  • 25. Leifer, Larry
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Van der Loos, Machiel
    Feland, John
    Design for wellbeing - innovations for people2005In: Human Centered Design, Maruzen for 10th anniversary of the Kanto Branch, Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers , 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing need for engineering designers to engage in creative activities that result in innovative products and technologies for the benefit of society. However, from an engineering perspective, issues of ‘life quality’ are currently heavily under-prioritized, particularly with regard to people with disabilities. This paper argues that both needs and solutions are now part of the designer’s responsibility, and that it is crucial to make a qualitative assessment of both the potential market impact and the ‘quality of life’ improvements afforded by innovations. Design for Wellbeing offers a perspective on life quality that goes beyond the traditional scope of assistive technology in that it aims to help people make a transformation from an actual state of being to a desired state of being – regardless of ability level.

  • 26.
    Lorenzini, Giana Carli
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, SWE.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lunds universitet, SWE.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    User involvement in pharmaceutical packaging design -A case study2017In: DS87-8 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 21ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 17), VOL 8: HUMAN BEHAVIOUR IN DESIGN / [ed] Kokkolaras M.,Fadel G.,Maier A.M.,Oehmen J.,Skec S.,Kim H.,Van der Loos M.,Salustri F., The Design Society, 2017, Vol. 8, no DS87-8, p. 41-50, article id DS87-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different levels of user involvement in product design range from understanding user needs to codesigning with users. Previous research shows older patients face difficulties to handle the medication packaging. Yet the participation of older patients in pharmaceutical packaging design is underexplored. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of older patients in the design and development of pharmaceutical packaging. Two empirical examples of one drug manufacturer and one pharmaceutical packaging supplier build one case study. The findings reveal new pharmaceutical packaging development starts with market research about patients' populations. The packaging development is then led internally or with external partners. Later, patients test the packages concepts developed. These findings go in line with previous research about the involvement of users in industries with a high technology orientation. This study is aligned with the about limited resources in healthcare and contributes with a conceptual framework of user involvement, a useful tool for managers and developers to benchmark their design process.

  • 27. Wallin, Johanna
    et al.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Measuring innovation capability in technology-focused development2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development in the aerospace industry is associated with relatively long lead times and product lifecycles, which means that it takes years and even decades to find out if a novel product or technology concept fully realizes its potential and becomes an innovation on the market. How can a company in such an industry context know, preferably already in the conceptual stages, that they are on the path to innovation? How do they know how innovative they are? How can they increase their innovation capability? A project together with Volvo Aero, an aero engine manufacturer, was initiated to explore potential answers to these questions. The paper reports on an ongoing study of the company’s current state-of-practice with regard to measuring innovation capability, starting from a range of innovation indicators provided within a previous research project, which Volvo Aero contributed to. Based on interviews with project managers of advanced engineering projects within the company, six areas were found to be of importance in order to more effectively measure the innovation capability at Volvo Aero: Project selection, Customer involvement, Interaction between functions, Team climate, Innovation methodology and Innovation rewards. Within these areas a selection of preliminary metrics was established, which will be presented in this article along with a discussion on the advantages and drawbacks of combining activity and effect measures to better relate particular activities to particular outcomes.

  • 28.
    Wallin, Johanna
    et al.
    Volvo Aero Corporation.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Volvo Aero Corporation.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Measuring innovation capability - Assessing collaborative performance in product-service system innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a qualitative study, carried out at a Swedish aero engine manufacturer. The study was initiated to explore key indicators related to innovation capability in a Product-Service System (PSS) context. Developing PSS changes the dynamics of collaboration, since the offering of such systems usually involves a network of partners sharing the responsibility for a delivered function over a full lifecycle. In particular, this paper focuses on describing aspects related to external and internal collaboration, and it further discusses how to measure the company’s collaborative performance, taking into account both activity and effect measures.

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