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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Standing alone when life takes an unexpected turn: Being a midlife next of kin of a relative who has suffered a myocardial infarction2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 864-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Suffering a myocardial infarction (MI) is a life-threatening event that impacts not only on the individual concerned but also on the next of kin. However, there seems to be a paucity of naturalistic inquiries that focus specifically on midlife next of kin and their experience of being close to a relative who has suffered an MI. This study aims to elucidate the experience of being a midlife next of kin of a relative who has suffered a myocardial infarction. Method: Nine women and four men in midlife participated in the focused interviews, which were conducted and analysed during 2010/2011 using Lindseths and Norbergs' description of the phenomenological hermeneutical method. Findings: Four themes - Solely responsible, Lurking unease, Left out of the picture and Life on hold - formed the basis of the core theme Standing alone when life takes an unexpected turn. The core theme was interpreted as a central phenomenon encompassing the experience of being solely responsible for the well-being of their relative and the family, thus putting their own life on hold. The core theme also reflected the next of kin's experience of being left out of the picture when it came to the relative's care before and after the MI. Conclusion: The next of kin's negative feelings of standing alone were further intensified by their experience of being left out of the picture by the healthcare professionals concerning their relative's care. As a cardiac nurse, it would seem essential to have knowledge about the experiences of next of kin in connection with a relative's MI event. Such knowledge can facilitate the planning and organisation of nursing care and at the same time address the next of kin's role in the recovery and rehabilitation process.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    The experience of younger adults following myocardial infarction2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323 , Vol. 23, no 6, p. 762-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the experience of younger people (< 55 years) during their first year following a myocardial infarction. We analyzed 17 interviews using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The core theme and central phenomenon was the everyday fight to redress the balance in life, which encompassed an existential, physical, and emotional battle to regain a foothold in daily life. The aftermath of a life-threatening event involved a process of transition while at the same time creating a new meaning in life. Lack of energy and its impact on the complex interplay of midlife combined with unreasonable demands from employers and health care professionals seemed to color the experience of the informants. The knowledge gained in this study can constitute a valuable contribution to overall quality assurance in nursing care and the development of nursing interventions for the cardiac rehabilitation of younger patients.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Willman, Ania
    Younger people’s experiences of life after having survived an acute myocardial infarction: An interview study2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Dellkvist, Helen
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Johansson, Ulrika Bernow
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Karlskrona Municipal, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care: An interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care. Design An explorative descriptive qualitative design was used. Methods The data were collected using semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of eight relatives and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Results Results show that creating and sharing the life story of a close family member could help relatives handle grief and stress. It was perceived as an important, yet difficult, task to ensure that the close family member got good quality care. The creation of a meaningful life story takes time and requires cooperation with family members and other significant people.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health. Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Health Science.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Younger persons' and their next of kin's experiences of cardiac care during the first year following a myocardial infarction2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no S1, p. S37-S38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sjöstrand-Strand, Annica
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Registered nurses views of caring in coronary care: a deductive and inductive content analysis2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23-24, p. 3481-3493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To extend nurses’ descriptions of how they understood caring, as reflected in the findings of an earlier study (i.e. the hierarchical outcome space) and to gain additional understandings and perspectives of nurses’ views of caring in relation to a coronary care patient case.

    Background

    Scientific literature from the 1970s–1990s contains descriptions of caring in nursing. In contrast, the contemporary literature on this topic – particularly in the context of coronary care – is very sparse, and the few studies that do contain descriptions rarely do so from the perspective of nurses.

    Design

    Qualitative descriptive study.

    Methods

    Twenty-one nurses were interviewed using the stimulated recall interview technique. The data were analysed using deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results of the iterative and integrated content analysis showed that the data mainly reproduced the content of the hierarchical outcome space describing how nurses could understand caring; however, in the outcome space, the relationship broke up (i.e. flipped). The nurses’ views of caring could now also be understood as: person-centredness ‘lurking’ in the shadows; limited ‘potential’ for safeguarding patients’ best interests; counselling as virtually the ‘only’ nursing intervention; and caring preceded by the ‘almighty’ context. Their views offered alternative and, at times, contrasting perspectives of caring, thereby adding to our understanding of it.

    Conclusion

    Caring was described as operating somewhere between the nurses caring values and the contextual conditions in which caring occurred. This challenged their ability to sustain caring in accordance with their values and the patients’ preferences.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    To ensure that the essentials of caring are met at all times, nurses need to plan and deliver caring in a systematic way. The use of systematic structures in caring, as the nursing process, can help nurses to work in a person-centred way, while sustaining their professional values.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sjöstrom-Strand, Annica
    Lunds universitet, SWE.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, SWE.
    Registered nurses’ descriptions of caring: a phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id Article number 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ conceptions of caring. Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth’s description of phenomenography. Results: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses’ perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient’s best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. Conclusion: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses’ collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care.

  • 8. Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bala, Sidona-Valentina
    Dahlman, Gull-Britt
    Ekwall, Anna K.
    Glasdam, Stinne
    Hommel, Ami
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Persson, Eva I.
    Rantala, Andreas
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Wihlborg, Jonas
    Samuelson, Karin
    Essentials of Teamcare in Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidisciplinary or Interdisciplinary Interventions in Somatic Care: A Systematic Review2015In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 1089-1101Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Teamcare should, like all patient care, also contribute to evidence-based practice (EBP). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on teamcare have been performed but no study has addressed its essentials. How far this EBP has progressed in different health aspects is generally established in systematic reviews of RCTs. Aim: The aim is to determine the essentials of teamcare including the nurse profession in RCTs of multi- or interdisciplinary interventions in somatic care focusing on the stated context, goals, strategies, content as well as effectiveness of quality of care. Methods: A systematic review was performed according to Cochrane review assumptions to identify, appraise and synthesize all empirical evidence meeting pre-specified eligibility criteria. The PRISMA statement guided the data selection process of 27 articles from PubMed and CINAHL. Results: Eighty-five percent of RCTs in somatic care showed a positive effectiveness of teamcare interventions, of which interdisciplinary ones showed a greater effectiveness compared with the multidisciplinary approach (100% vs 76%). Also theory-based RCTs presented higher positive effectiveness (85%) compared with non-theory-based RCTs (79%). The RCTs with positive effectiveness showed greater levels for professional-centered ambition in terms of goals and for team-directed initiatives in terms of strategy, and a significantly higher level for patient-team interaction plans in terms of content was shown. Conclusions: Teamcare RCTs are still grounded in the multidisciplinary approach having a professional-centered ambition while interdisciplinary approaches especially those that are theory-based appear to be essential with regard to positive effectiveness and preferable when person-centered careis applied.

  • 9. Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Jönsson, A.C.
    Andersson, Ewa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Bala, S.-V.
    Dahlman, G.-B.
    Forsberg, A.
    Glasdam, S.
    Krstensson, A.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sivberg, B.
    Essentials of Nursing Care in Randomized Controlled Trials of Nurse-Led Interventions in Somatic Care: A Systematic Review2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 181-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing practice has to contribute to evidence pointing out why there is a need for more nurse-designed randomized control trials (RCTs) focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP). How far this EBP has progressed in different health aspects is usually established by systematic reviews of RCTs. Nurse-led RCTs exist but no study has addressed the essentials of nursing care. Aim: The aim was therefore to determine the essentials of nurses’ interventions by means of nurse-led RCTs in somatic care focusing on the stated context, goals, content, strategies as well as the nurse’s role related to effectiveness. Methods: A systematic review was realized according to Cochrane review assumptions to identify, appraise and synthesize all empirical evidence meeting pre-specified eligibility criteria. The PRISMA statement guided the data extraction process (n = 55) from PubMed and CINAHL. Results: Of the RCTs in somatic care, 71% showed a positive effectiveness of nurse-led interventions, of which the nurse had a significant role with regard to being the main responsible in 67% of the studies. Also, 47% of the RCTs presented a theoretical standpoint related to the nurse-led interventions and most prominent were international evidence-based guidelines. Goals were found to have either a patient-centered or a professional-centered ambition. Strategies were based on patient-directed initiatives, nurse-patient-directed initiatives or nurse-directed initiatives, while contents were built upon either a patient-nurse interaction or a nursing management plan. Conclusions: This review underlines the necessity of a holistic view of a person, as nurse-led RCTs comprising a patient-centered ambition, patient-directed initiative and patient-nurse interaction plan showed beneficial nursing care effectiveness, particularly if theory-based. In a nurse-led RCT, a basic theoretical perspective is advantageous as well as to elucidate the role of the nurse in relation to the estimated effects.

  • 10.
    Marcinowicz, Ludmiła
    et al.
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Bohman, Doris
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Hjelm, Markus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skarbalienė, Aelita
    Klaipeda University, LTU.
    Shpakou, Andrei
    Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, UKR.
    Kalinowska, P.
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Jamiolkowski, Jacek
    Medical University of Bialystok, POL.
    Nursing students’ perception of the professional nurse's role in four European countries2019In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding how nursing students in European countries perceive their future professional role is an important step in creating awareness of the diversity and similarities between countries. Investigating nursing students’ perceptions of their future profession could help in the design of education and the retention of nurses. Aim: To compare nursing students’ perceptions of the professional nurse's role between Belarus, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden. Method: A cross-sectional design was implemented. The study used two scales of the Professional Nursing Image Survey, which has questions about 10 skills and abilities and 14 functions and duties of a nurse. Results: A total of 392 final-year nursing students in four countries participated in the study. Statistically significant differences were found between countries in terms of all 10 skills and abilities and in the distribution of responses concerning functions and duties of a nurse. Conclusions: Nursing students in Belarus, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden perceive differently the role of a nurse in terms of some functions and responsibilities. This may influence the adaptation of nurses who enjoy freedom of movement among the countries. Implications for nursing policy: The knowledge gained in this study could be beneficial in improving nursing education, as it could illuminate the discrepancy between educational goals and students’ perceptions of their future professional role. © 2018 International Council of Nurses

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