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  • 1. Eisele, Per
    Effects of individual planning prior to teamwork on generation of ideas and goals.2011In: Baltic Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1407-768X, Vol. 12, no 1-2, p. 46-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of Experiment 1 was to compare the effects of structured vs non-structured interaction and individual planning prior to interaction vs no planning on group performance, i.e. number of ideas generated. Participants (N = 99) were randomly assigned to 3-person groups. Analysis indicated that both strategies increased effectiveness of groups working on a task requiring creativity. Experiment 2 was a field experiment with 57 participants who worked in 3-person groups on an idea and goal-generating task. In Experiment 3 (N = 216), a more complex design was used to test the validity of initial findings in the first two experiments. Analysis showed that individual planning prior to interaction increase number of ideas

  • 2.
    Eisele, Per
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    The predictive validity of the team diagnostic survey: Testing a model with performance and satisfaction as output variables2015In: Team Performance Management, ISSN 1352-7592, E-ISSN 1758-6860, Vol. 21, no 5-6, p. 293-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aims of the present study were to test the predictive validity of the Swedish version of the Team Diagnostic Survey (TDS). Design/methodology/approach – A model with both performance and satisfaction was tested with structural equation model (SEM) analyses. Participants completing the survey were employees (N, 214) across three large workplaces. Analyses were done at the group level and data from 33 teams were included in the final data material. Findings – Results from validation data indicate that the TDS has satisfactory high Cronbach’s alpha values on most factors. Results from the SEM analyses show a moderate model fit for the main model. Team-level factors predict both performance and satisfaction, while organization and coaching factors do not. Research limitations/implications – The present study was limited to a cross-sectional design, but earlier studies have shown that the accuracy of the TDS remains consistent over time. The main purpose of this study was to test the predictive validity of the instrument. Theoretical implications of the study are that a survey can be used to get a valid overall picture of the real-life work team’s effectiveness. Practical implications – Practical implications of the study are that communication between researcher and/or consultant and organizational stakeholders is made easier, as the most important factors that affect team effectiveness are identified. Originality/value – The work on the development on TDS has shown that it is possible to use a complex instrument to diagnose work groups, and this line of research is leading the way for better instruments. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Eisele, Per
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Validation of the Team Diagnostic Survey and a Field Experiment to Examine the Effects of an Intervention to Increase Team Effectiveness2013In: Group facilitation: A research and practice journal, ISSN 1534-5653, Vol. 12, p. 53-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study presented in this article were to validate the Swedish version of the Team Diagnostic Survey (TDS), and to examine effects of a feedback intervention to increase team effectiveness. The TDS is based on Hackman 's (2002) theory of group effectiveness which described three main criteria of performance and 14 factors that should affect team effectiveness. Participants in the survey were employees (N=533) across several different workplaces. Analyses were done at the group level, and data from 97 teams was included in the final data material. The sample (n=237) for the randomized field experiment consisted of 31 real life work teams from the larger survey sample (n=533/97). Results from validation data indicate that the TDS has satisfactory high Cronbach's Alpha values on most factors. Cronbachs's Alpha is a statistical measure of internal consistency; that is, how closely related a set of items are as a group. Results from the field experiment indicated that there was an overall increase in self-reported team effecti veness from first to second measurement. On several factors of team effectiveness a number were significantly higher for those receiving the TDS-based feedback. The outcomes suggest that group work practice might benefit from using research-oriented surveys such as the Team Diagnostic Survey as an effective feedback tool.

  • 4. Eisele, Per
    et al.
    D’Amato, Alessia
    Psychological climate and its relation to work performance and well-being: the role of general self-efficacy and organizational citizenship behavior2011In: Baltic Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1407-768X, Vol. 12, no 1,2, p. 4-21Article in journal (Refereed)
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