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  • 1. Ghannad, Navid
    et al.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Change of entrepreneurial agenda in a core competence context: exploring the transformation from technology focus to market focus2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 148-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newest small firms – the start-ups in general and the international new ventures (INV) in particular – face major difficulties from the beginning. Not only do they need to bring competitively unique products to a new, highly competitive market, but they also must be successful in convincing customers of their products' benefits. This ultimate small firm test is in fact very similar to the criteria that define the core competence concept. Still, core competence matters have historically been delimited to large, preferably diversified companies. In this paper, we apply core competence theory and entrepreneurship theories on a small firm's empirical context. We concentrate on technology focused INVs and on the change, or transformation, these start-ups must complete in order to adopt a more market-oriented focus. Without the transformation, we argue, the small firm will not be able to expand. The purpose of the paper is to explore parts of the processes changed during the transformation and to enhance our understanding of core competence applicability on small companies. We formulate propositions, empirically guided and theoretically anchored, that describe four different components that facilitate the small firm technology-to-market transformation.

  • 2.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Adding dynamics to core competence concept applications2013In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 453-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to enhance practical applications, by refining the original core competence concept to better fit dynamic environments. Design/methodology/approach – This paper combines theoretical research streams treating core competence and dynamic capability. Findings – The original core competence concept cannot help managers with today's dynamic business environments. This paper theoretically reviews conceptions of core competence to enhance dynamism and better align theory and practice. The author concludes that a core competence could become more dynamic in three ways, by: balancing itself with the external environment and including external activities and processes; reducing path-dependency influences; and carefully “orchestrating” resources, by guidance rather than control, to release the inherent potential of project teams. Research limitations/implications – The author rejuvenates a popular concept by including contemporary, more dynamic considerations; however, his propositions need to be tested empirically. Practical implications – Three criteria are reformulated to match contemporary dynamism; these are also rephrased to better meet practical applications and take account of the internal sharing and transfer of competencies. This supplements the practitioner's toolbox for managing core competence in a company. For ideal core competence dynamism, managers should selectively incorporate external information and adapt external activities and processes, all to match the existing internal resource base. Originality/value – This paper incorporates contemporary dynamics in an important strategy concept.

  • 3.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Aspects of Management Roles and Dynamic Capability2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the dynamic capability theory perspective, we complement recent research by examining three organisational management roles (top, local, and ad hoc) and the dynamic capability framework in a healthcare empirical context. In particular, we apply a bottom–up perspective when viewing management in local units, which adds to existing research into dynamic capability, which normally takes a top managerial perspective. We bring new knowledge of the sensing, seizing, and transforming capabilities and of how, in an unbalanced configuration, they could hinder optimal performance in terms of organisational efficiency during organisational change. The purpose of the paper is to categorise dynamic capability in technology innovation implementations from the perspectives of different management roles.

  • 4.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Going practical on the core competence concept: On Links, Levels, Time and Context2013In: Knowledge and Process Management, ISSN 1092-4604, E-ISSN 1099-1441, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We update the original core competence notions of identification and development to fit high efficient innovation processes in dynamic environments, with aim to progress the concept's applicability for scholars and practitioners. To the core competence concept we add four dimensions previously missing: time (shared history and shared future aims), managerial hierarchy levels (corporate and SBU), innovation development modes and outcome types (radical/incremental and exploitation/exploration), and finally innovation team characteristics and support structure (homogenous/heterogeneous and formal/informal structure). We propose that existing core competencies are ideally explored by homogenous teams managed at the SBU-level, in structured context, which infers competitive imitation protection. The process starts with identification then progressed by a change in structure: going from formal to informal, which will increase core competence and company performance.

  • 5. Ljungquist, Urban
    Propositions for the expanded core competence model2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper advances our conceptions of core competence, going beyond mere identification. Drawing on existing theories, the paper proposes how the influences on a core competence can be managed by acknowledging the need for influence, and the applicability of associated concepts to satisfy that need. We also add a time continuum, wherein a company's shared history and shared future specific goals are highlighted, which could strengthen the influence on a core competence. An expanded core competence model is proposed. The model suggests a more detailed, more comprehensive approach, applicable to core competence management issues by scholars and practitioners alike.

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  • 6.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Unbalanced Dynamic Capabilities as Obstacles of Organisational Efficiency: Implementation Issues in Innovative Technology Adoption2014In: Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice, ISSN 1447-9338, E-ISSN 2204-0226, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 2682-2706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the dynamic capability framework in a healthcare context. It offers empirical experience of the sensing, seizing, and transforming capabilities acting in unbalanced configuration, potentially hindering organisational efficiency. Recent research is complemented by connecting three management roles to the dynamic capability framework. Lack of top management vision and co-ordination could lead to excessive autonomy of subunits, hindering knowledge and information transfer within the organisation. The findings also identify an organisational paradox that puts undue pressure on units to be dually flexible and consistent, thus pushing separation of content from process.

  • 7.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Growth in international new ventures: facilitating and redundant components beyond start-up2015In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 103-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to identify facilitating and redundant components of core competence development during the growth of international new ventures (INVs). Through a longitudinal empirical study comparing three cases based on a large number of interviews, we describe how individual competences essential for the start-up firm (entrepreneurial, market and network) over three phases (small, youth and mature) eventually become redundant or transform into institutionalised routines. An INV built on technology competence needs to combine with market competences, preferably in parallel, for ideal market development. To expand further, the entrepreneurial competence ultimately should be reduced or omitted. To boost expansion, explicate visions and policies should be added to maintain the entrepreneurial spirit and legacy, and to guide employees.

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