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  • 1. Barbosa, Manuel
    et al.
    Moss, Andrew
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Page, Dan
    Rodrigues, Nuno
    Silva, Paulo
    Type checking cryptography implementations2012In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer , 2012, Vol. 7141, p. 316-334Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cryptographic software development is a challenging field: high performance must be achieved, while ensuring correctness and compliance with low-level security policies. CAO is a domain specific language designed to assist development of cryptographic software. An important feature of this language is the design of a novel type system introducing native types such as predefined sized vectors, matrices and bit strings, residue classes modulo an integer, finite fields and finite field extensions, allowing for extensive static validation of source code. We present the formalisation, validation and implementation of this type system.

  • 2.
    Betz, Stefanie
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Fricker, Samuel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Moss, Andrew
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Svahnberg, Mikael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Wohlin, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Börstler, Jürgen
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    An Evolutionary Perspective on Socio-Technical Congruence:The Rubber Band Effect2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conway’s law assumes a strong association between the system’s architecture and the organization’s communication structure that designs it. In the light of contemporary software development, when many companies rely on geographically distributed teams, which often turn out to be temporarily composed and thus having an often changing communication structure, the importance of Conway’s law and its inspired work grows. In this paper, we examine empirical research related to Conway’s law and its application for cross-site coordination. Based on the results obtained we conjecture that changes in the communication structure alone sooner or later trigger changes in the design structure of the software products to return the sociotechnical system into the state of congruence. This is further used to formulate a concept of a rubber band effect and propose a replication study that goes beyond the original idea of Conway’s law by investigating the evolution of socio-technical congruence over time.

  • 3. Granger, Robert
    et al.
    Moss, Andrew
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Generalised mersenne numbers revisited2013In: Mathematics of Computation, ISSN 0025-5718, E-ISSN 1088-6842, Vol. 82, no 284, p. 2389-2420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generalised Mersenne Numbers (GMNs) were defined by Solinas in 1999 and feature in the NIST (FIPS 186-2) and SECG standards for use in elliptic curve cryptography. Their form is such that modular reduction is extremely efficient, thus making them an attractive choice for modular multiplication implementation. However, the issue of residue multiplication efficiency seems to have been overlooked. Asymptotically, using a cyclic rather than a linear convolution, residue multiplication modulo a Mersenne number is twice as fast as integer multiplication; this property does not hold for prime GMNs, unless they are of Mersenne's form. In this work we exploit an alternative generalisation of Mersenne numbers for which an analogue of the above property - and hence the same efficiency ratio - holds, even at bitlengths for which schoolbook multiplication is optimal, while also maintaining very efficient reduction. Moreover, our proposed primes are abundant at any bitlength, whereas GMNs are extremely rare. Our multiplication and reduction algorithms can also be easily parallelised, making our arithmetic particularly suitable for hardware implementation. Furthermore, the field representation we propose also naturally protects against side-channel attacks, including timing attacks, simple power analysis and differential power analysis, which is essential in many cryptographic scenarios, in constrast to GMNs.

  • 4.
    Moss, Andrew
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Oswald, Elisabeth
    Page, dan
    Tunstall, Michael
    Compiler Assisted Masking2012In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer , 2012, Vol. 7428, p. 58-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differential Power Analysis (DPA) attacks find a statistical correlation between the power consumption of a cryptographic device and intermediate values within the computation. Randomization via (Boolean) masking of intermediate values breaks this statistical dependence and thus prevents such attacks (at least up to a certain order). Especially for software implementations, (first-order) masking schemes are popular in academia and industry, albeit typically not as the sole countermeasure. The current practice then is to manually 'insert' Boolean masks: essentially software developers need to manipulate low-level assembly language to implement masking. In this paper we make a first step to automate this process, at least for first-order Boolean masking, allowing the development of compilers capable of protecting programs against DPA.

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