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  • 1.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Towards a mapping of software technical debt onto testware2017In: Proceedings - 43rd Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, SEAA 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 404-411, article id 8051379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical Debt (TD) is a metaphor used to explain the negative impacts that sub-optimal design decisions have in the long-term perspective of a software project. Although TD is acknowledged by both researchers and practitioners to have strong negative impact on Software development, its study on Testware has so far been very limited. A gap in knowledge that is important to address due to the growing popularity of Testware (scripted automated testing) in software development practice.In this paper we present a mapping analysis that connects 21 well-known, Software, object-oriented TD items to Testware, establishing them as Testware Technical Debt (TTD) items. The analysis indicates that most Software TD items are applicable or observable as TTD items, often in similar form and with roughly the same impact as for Software artifacts (e.g. reducing quality of the produced artifacts, lowering the effectiveness and efficiency of the development process whilst increasing costs). In the analysis, we also identify three types of connections between software TD and TTD items with varying levels of impact and criticality. Additionally, the study finds support for previous research results in which specific TTD items unique to Testware were identified. Finally, the paper outlines several areas of future research into TTD. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 2.
    Aouachria, Moufida
    et al.
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Leshob, Abderrahmane
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Ghomari, Abdessamed Réda
    Ecole nationale superieure d'Informatique, DZA.
    Hadaya, Pierre
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Business Process Integration: How to Achieve Interoperability through Process Patterns2017In: Proceedings - 14th IEEE International Conference on E-Business Engineering, ICEBE 2017 - Including 13th Workshop on Service-Oriented Applications, Integration and Collaboration, SOAIC 207, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 109-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business process integration (BPI) is a crucial technique for supporting inter-organizational business interoperability. BPI allows automation of business processes and the integration of systems across numerous organizations. The integration of organizations' process models is one of the most addressed and used approach to achieve BPI. However, this model integration is complex and requires that designers have extensive experience in particular when organizations' business processes are incompatible. This paper considers the issue of modeling cross-organization processes out of a collection of organizations' private process models. To this end, we propose six adaptation patterns to resolve incompatibilities when combining organizations' processes. Each pattern is formalized with workflow net. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 3.
    Blal, Redouane
    et al.
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Leshob, Abderrahmane
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Mili, Hafedh
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    Boubaker, Anis
    Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CAN.
    From inter-organizational business process models to service-oriented architecture models2018In: Service Oriented Computing and Applications, ISSN 1863-2386, E-ISSN 1863-2394, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 227-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s business processes become increasingly complex and often cross the boundaries of the organizations. On the one hand, to support their business processes, modern organizations use enterprise information systems that need to be aware of the organizations’ processes and contexts. Such systems are called Process-Aware Information System (PAIS). On the other hand, the service-oriented architecture (SOA) is a fast emerging architectural style that has been widely adopted by modern organizations to design and implement PAIS that support their business processes. This paper aims to bridge the gap between inter-organizational business processes and SOA-based PAISs that support them. It proposes a novel model-driven design method that generates SOA models expressed in SoaML taking the specification of collaborative business processes expressed in BPMN as input. We present the principles underlying the approach, the state of an ongoing implementation, and the results of two studies conducted to empirically validate the method in the context of ERP key processes. © 2018, Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature.

  • 4.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Ouriques, Raquel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Approaching the Relative Estimation Concept with Planning Poker2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, p. 21-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation is a powerful instrument in the education process that can help students experience a reality context and understand complex concepts required to accomplish practitioners' tasks. The present study aims to investigate the software engineering students' perception about the usefulness of the Planning Poker technique in relation to their understanding of the relative estimation concept. We conducted a simulation exercise where students first estimated tasks applying the concepts of relative estimation based on the concepts explained in the lecture, and then to estimate tasks applying the Agile Planning Poker technique. To investigate the students' perception, we used a survey at the end of each exercise. The preliminary results did not show statistical significance on the students' confidence to estimate relatively the user stories. However, from the students' comments and feedback, there are indications that students are more confident in using Agile Planning Poker when they are asked to estimate user stories. The study will be replicated in the near future to a different group of students with a different background, to have a better understanding and also identify possible flaws of the exercise. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 5.
    de Carvalho, Renata M.
    et al.
    Univ Quebec, LATECE Lab, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Mili, Hafedh
    Univ Quebec, LATECE Lab, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Boubaker, Anis
    Univ Quebec, LATECE Lab, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Ringuette, Simon
    Trisotech Inc, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    On the analysis of CMMN expressiveness: revisiting workflow patterns2016In: 2016 IEEE 20TH INTERNATIONAL ENTERPRISE DISTRIBUTED OBJECT COMPUTING WORKSHOP (EDOCW), 2016, p. 54-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional business process modeling languages use an imperative style to specify all possible execution flows, leaving little flexibility to process operators. Such languages are appropriate for low-complexity, high-volume, mostly automated processes. However, they are inadequate for case management, which involves low-volume, high-complexity, knowledge-intensive work processes of today's knowledge workers. OMG's Case Management Model and Notation (CMMN), which uses a declarative style to specify constraints placed at a process execution, aims at addressing this need. To the extent that typical case management situations do include at least some measure of imperative control, it is legitimate to ask whether an analyst working exclusively in CMMN can comfortably model the range of behaviors s/he is likely to encounter. This paper aims at answering this question by trying to express the extensive collection of Workflow Patterns in CMMN. Unsurprisingly, our study shows that the workflow patterns fall into three categories: 1) the ones that are handled by CMMN basic constructs, 2) those that rely on CMMN's engine capabilities and 3) the ones that cannot be handled by current CMMN specification. A CMMN tool builder can propose patterns of the second category as companion modeling idioms, which can be translated behind the scenes into standard CMMN. The third category is problematic, however, since its support in CMMN tools will break model interoperability.

  • 6.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Boubaker, Anis
    Univ Quebec, CAN.
    Mili, Hafedh
    Univ Quebec, CAN.
    A Business Process Re-Engineering Approach to Transform BPMN Models to Software Artifacts2017In: E-TECHNOLOGIES: EMBRACING THE INTERNET OF THINGS, MCETECH 2017 / [ed] Aimeur, E Ruhi, U Weiss, M, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2017, p. 170-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) is becoming a de-facto standard for the specification of organizational business processes. In most cases, business processes are modeled in order to build software that may support or automate specific parts of those processes. In this work, we aim at refining BPMN models in order to automatically derive software analysis and design artifacts (e.g., UML Class Diagrams or Use Cases) from a given BPMN. These artifacts will be later on used to develop the software components (not necessarily services) automating or supporting business process activities. Our envisioned approach is based on a three-steps model transformation chain: (1) we refine the BPMN as-is model; (2) we apply process re-engineering and automation patterns to generate the BPMN to-be model; and (3) we use the resulting to-be BPMN model to derive analysis and design software artifacts. In this paper, we focus on the first two steps of the approach.

  • 7. Ickin, Selim
    et al.
    Petersen, Kai
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Why do users install and delete apps?: A survey study2017In: Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, Springer Verlag , 2017, Vol. 304, p. 186-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Practitioners on the area of mobile application development usually rely on set of app-related success factors, the majority of which are directly related to their economical/business profit (e.g., number of downloads, or the in-app purchases revenue). However, gathering also the user-related success factors, that explain the reasons why users choose, download, and install apps as well as the user-related failure factors that explain the reasons why users delete apps, might help practitioners understand how to improve the market impact of their apps. The objectives were to: identify (i) the reasons why users choose and installing mobile apps from app stores; (ii) the reasons why users uninstall the apps. A questionnaire-based survey involving 121 users from 26 different countries was conducted. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.

  • 8.
    Leshob, Abderrahmane
    et al.
    University of Quebec at Montreal, CAN.
    Mili, Hafedh
    University of Quebec at Montreal, CAN.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Boubaker, Anis
    University of Quebec at Montreal, CAN.
    A value-oriented approach to business process specialization: Principles, proof-of-concept, and validation2017In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 127, p. 120-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations build information systems to support their business processes. Precise modeling of an organization's processes is a prerequisite for building information systems that support those processes. Our goal is to help business analysts produce detailed models of the business processes that best reflect the needs of their organizations. To this end, we propose to a) leverage the best practices in terms of a kernel of generic business processes, and b) provide analysts with tools to customize those processes by generating new process variants. We use business patterns from the Resource Event Agent ontology to identify variation points, and to codify the transformations inherent in the generation of the process variants. We developed a prototype process specialization tool using the Eclipse modeling ecosystem. We tested our approach on a set of processes from the Enterprise Resource Planning literature, and a set of variation points to assess the extent to which: 1) the identified variation points made sense, and 2) whether the generated variants made sense, from a business point of view. The results showed that 94.12% of the variation points made sense, and that 80.6% of the generated process variants corresponded to what the business process management specialists expected.

  • 9.
    Molléri, Jefferson Seide
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Henningsson, Kennet
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    A legacy game for project management in software engineering courses2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, p. 72-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Software project management courses are becoming popular for teaching software engineering process models and methods. However, in order to be effective, this approach should be properly aligned to the learning outcomes. Common misalignments are caused by using a correct degree of realism or an appropriate instruction level. Objective: To foster students to acquire knowledge (theoretical and practical) that enables them solving similar challenges to the ones they will face in real-world software projects. Methods: We prototype and validate a legacy game that simulates the software development process. Students are required to plan and manage a software project according to its specification provided by the teachers. Teachers act as both customers and moderators, presenting the challenges and guiding the students' teamwork. Results: Both students' and teachers' perception suggest that the proposed game has potential to motivate the knowledge acquisition through problem-solving. The feedback also suggests that some measures must be taken to ensure the pedagogical alignment and a fair game. Conclusion: The lessons learned provide suggestions for adopting this or similar games in the context of project courses. As further work, we plan to describe and extend the game rules based on the results of this application. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 10.
    Sundelin, Anders
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Test-Driving FinTech Product Development: An Experience Report2018In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) / [ed] Ciolkowski M.,Hebig R.,Kuhrmann M.,Pfahl D.,Tell P.,Amasaki S.,Kupper S.,Schneider K.,Klunder J., Springer, 2018, Vol. 112171, p. 219-226Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present experiences from eight years of developing a financial transaction engine, using what can be described as an integration-test-centric software development process.We discuss the product and the relation between three different categories of its software and how the relative weight of these artifacts has varied over the years.In addition to the presentation, some challenges and future research directions are discussed.

  • 11.
    Zúñiga-Prieto, Miguel
    et al.
    Universitat Politècnica de València, ESP.
    González-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Insfran, Emilio
    Universitat Politècnica de València, ESP.
    Abrahão, Silvia
    Universitat Politècnica de València, ESP.
    Dynamic reconfiguration of cloud application architectures2018In: Software, practice & experience, ISSN 0038-0644, E-ISSN 1097-024X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 327-344, article id Special Issue: SIArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service-based cloud applications are software systems that continuously evolve to satisfy new user requirements and technological changes. This kind of applications also require elasticity, scalability, and high availability, which means that deployment of new functionalities or architectural adaptations to fulfill service level agreements (SLAs) should be performed while the application is in execution. Dynamic architectural reconfiguration is essential to minimize system disruptions while new or modified services are being integrated into existing cloud applications. Thus, cloud applications should be developed following principles that support dynamic reconfiguration of services, and also tools to automate these reconfigurations at runtime are needed. This paper presents an extension of a model-driven method for dynamic and incremental architecture reconfiguration of cloud services that allows developers to specify new services as software increments, and the tool to generate the implementation code for the services integration logic and the deployment and architectural reconfiguration scripts specific to the cloud environment in which the service will be deployed (e.g., Microsoft Azure). We also report the results of a quasi-experiment that empirically validate our method. It was conducted to evaluate their perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived intention to use. The results show that the participants perceive the method to be useful, and they also expressed their intention to use the method in the future. Although further experiments must be carried out to corroborate these results, the method has proven to be a promising architectural reconfiguration process for cloud applications in the context of agile and incremental development processes.

  • 12.
    Šāblis, Aivars
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Zabardast, Ehsan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Šmite, Darja
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Building lego towers: An exercise for teaching the challenges of global work2019In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 19, no 2, article id a15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global software engineering has changed the way software is developed today. To address the new challenges, many universities have launched specially tailored courses to train young professionals to work in globally distributed projects. However, a mere acknowledgment of the geographic, temporal, and cultural differences does not necessarily lead to a deep understanding of the underlying practical implications. Therefore, many universities developed alternative teaching and learning activities, such as multi-university collaborative projects and small-scale simulations or games. In this article, we present a small-scale exercise that uses LEGO bricks to teach skills necessary for global work. We describe the many different interventions that could be implemented in the execution of the exercise. We had seven runs of the exercises and report our findings from executing seven runs of the exercise with the total of 104 students from five different courses in two different universities. Our results suggest that the exercise can be a valuable tool to help students dealing with troublesome knowledge associated with global software engineering and a useful complement to the courses dedicated to this subject. © 2019 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s)

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