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  • 1.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Feldt, Robert
    Chalmers, SWE.
    On the long-term use of visual gui testing in industrial practice: a case study2017In: Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, ISSN 1382-3256, E-ISSN 1573-7616, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 2937-2971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual GUI Testing (VGT) is a tool-driven technique for automated GUI-based testing that uses image recognition to interact with and assert the correctness of the behavior of a system through its GUI as it is shown to the user. The technique’s applicability, e.g. defect-finding ability, and feasibility, e.g. time to positive return on investment, have been shown through empirical studies in industrial practice. However, there is a lack of studies that evaluate the usefulness and challenges associated with VGT when used long-term (years) in industrial practice. This paper evaluates how VGT was adopted, applied and why it was abandoned at the music streaming application development company, Spotify, after several years of use. A qualitative study with two workshops and five well chosen employees is performed at the company, supported by a survey, which is analyzed with a grounded theory approach to answer the study’s three research questions. The interviews provide insights into the challenges, problems and limitations, but also benefits, that Spotify experienced during the adoption and use of VGT. However, due to the technique’s drawbacks, VGT has been abandoned for a new technique/framework, simply called the Test interface. The Test interface is considered more robust and flexible for Spotify’s needs but has several drawbacks, including that it does not test the actual GUI as shown to the user like VGT does. From the study’s results it is concluded that VGT can be used long-term in industrial practice but it requires organizational change as well as engineering best practices to be beneficial. Through synthesis of the study’s results, and results from previous work, a set of guidelines are presented that aim to aid practitioners to adopt and use VGT in industrial practice. However, due to the abandonment of the technique, future research is required to analyze in what types of projects the technique is, and is not, long-term viable. To this end, we also present Spotify’s Test interface solution for automated GUI-based testing and conclude that it has its own benefits and drawbacks.

  • 2.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gonzalez-Huerta, Javier
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Towards a mapping of software technical debt onto testware2017In: Proceedings - 43rd Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, SEAA 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 404-411, article id 8051379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical Debt (TD) is a metaphor used to explain the negative impacts that sub-optimal design decisions have in the long-term perspective of a software project. Although TD is acknowledged by both researchers and practitioners to have strong negative impact on Software development, its study on Testware has so far been very limited. A gap in knowledge that is important to address due to the growing popularity of Testware (scripted automated testing) in software development practice.In this paper we present a mapping analysis that connects 21 well-known, Software, object-oriented TD items to Testware, establishing them as Testware Technical Debt (TTD) items. The analysis indicates that most Software TD items are applicable or observable as TTD items, often in similar form and with roughly the same impact as for Software artifacts (e.g. reducing quality of the produced artifacts, lowering the effectiveness and efficiency of the development process whilst increasing costs). In the analysis, we also identify three types of connections between software TD and TTD items with varying levels of impact and criticality. Additionally, the study finds support for previous research results in which specific TTD items unique to Testware were identified. Finally, the paper outlines several areas of future research into TTD. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 3.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Petersen, Kai
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Mattsson, Michael
    Characteristics that affect Preference of Decision Models for Asset Selection: An Industrial Questionnaire Survey2019In: Software quality journal, ISSN 0963-9314, E-ISSN 1573-1367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern software development relies on a combination of development and re-use of technical asset, e.g. software components, libraries and APIs.In the past, re-use was mostly conducted with internal assets but today external; open source, customer off-the-shelf (COTS) and assets developed through outsourcing are also common.This access to more asset alternatives presents new challenges regarding what assets to optimally chose and how to make this decision.To support decision-makers, decision-theory has been used to develop decision models for asset selection.However, very little industrial data has been presented in literature about the usefulness, or even perceived usefulness, of these models.Additionally, only limited information has been presented about what model characteristics that determine practitioner preference towards one model over another.

    Objective: The objective of this work is to evaluate what characteristics of decision models for asset selection that determine industrial practitioner preference of a model when given the choice of a decision-model of high precision or a model with high speed.

    Method: An industrial questionnaire survey is performed where a total of 33 practitioners, of varying roles, from 18 companies are tasked to compare two decision models for asset selection.Textual analysis and formal and descriptive statistics are then applied on the survey responses to answer the study's research questions.

    Results: The study shows that the practitioners had clear preference towards the decision model that emphasised speed over the one that emphasised decision precision.This conclusion was determined to be because one of the models was perceived faster, had lower complexity, had, was more flexible in use for different decisions, was more agile how it could be used in operation, its emphasis on people, its emphasis on ``good enough'' precision and ability to fail fast if a decision was a failure.Hence, seven characteristics that the practitioners considered important for their acceptance of the model.

    Conclusion: Industrial practitioner preference, which relates to acceptance, of decision models for asset selection is dependent on multiple characteristics that must be considered when developing a model for different types of decisions such as operational day-to-day decisions as well as more critical tactical or strategic decisions.The main contribution of this work are seven identified characteristics that can serve as industrial requirements for future research on decision models for asset selection.

  • 4.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Petersen, Kai
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Mattsson, Michael
    Characteristics that affect Preference of Decision Models for Asset Selection: An Industrial Questionnaire Survey - Appendix A: Questionnaire Introduction. Decision-making in Practice / Appendix B: Survey results2019Data set
  • 5.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Gustafsson, Johan
    SAAB AB, SWE.
    Ivarsson, Henrik
    SAAB AB, SWE.
    Feldt, Robert
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Replicating Rare Software Failures with Exploratory Visual GUI Testing2017In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 53-59, article id 8048660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saab AB developed software that had a defect that manifested itself only after months of continuous system use. After years of customer failure reports, the defect still persisted, until Saab developed failure replication based on visual GUI testing. © 1984-2012 IEEE.

  • 6.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Karlsson, Arvid
    Cilbuper IT, Gothenburg, SWE.
    Radway, Alexander
    Techship Krokslatts Fabriker, SWE.
    Continuous Integration and Visual GUI Testing: Benefits and Drawbacks in Industrial Practice2018In: Proceedings - 2018 IEEE 11th International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation, ICST 2018, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2018, p. 172-181Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous integration (CI) is growing in industrial popularity, spurred on by market trends towards faster delivery and higher quality software. A key facilitator of CI is automated testing that should be executed, automatically, on several levels of system abstraction. However, many systems lack the interfaces required for automated testing. Others lack test automation coverage of the system under test's (SUT) graphical user interface (GUI) as it is shown to the user. One technique that shows promise to solve these challenges is Visual GUI Testing (VGT), which uses image recognition to stimulate and assert the SUT's behavior. Research has presented the technique's applicability and feasibility in industry but only limited support, from an academic setting, that the technique is applicable in a CI environment. In this paper we presents a study from an industrial design research study with the objective to help bridge the gap in knowledge regarding VGT's applicability in a CI environment in industry. Results, acquired from interviews, observations and quantitative analysis of 17.567 test executions, collected over 16 weeks, show that VGT provides similar benefits to other automated test techniques for CI. However, several significant drawbacks, such as high costs, are also identified. The study concludes that, although VGT is applicable in an industrial CI environment, its severe challenges require more research and development before the technique becomes efficient in practice. © 2018 IEEE.

  • 7.
    Alégroth, Emil
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Matsuki, Shinsuke
    Veriserve Corporation, JPN.
    Vos, Tanja
    Open University of the Netherlands, NLD.
    Akemine, Kinji
    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, JPN.
    Overview of the ICST International Software Testing Contest2017In: Proceedings - 10th IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation, ICST 2017, IEEE Computer Society, 2017, p. 550-551Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the software testing contest, practitioners and researcher's are invited to test their test approaches against similar approaches to evaluate pros and cons and which is perceivably the best. The 2017 iteration of the contest focused on Graphical User Interface-driven testing, which was evaluated on the testing tool TESTONA. The winner of the competition was announced at the closing ceremony of the international conference on software testing (ICST), 2017. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 8.
    Ardito, Luca
    et al.
    Politecnico di Torino, ITA.
    Coppola, Riccardo
    Politecnico di Torino, ITA.
    Torchiano, Marco
    Politecnico di Torino, ITA.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Towards automated translation between generations of GUI-based tests for mobile devices2018In: Companion Proceedings for the ISSTA/ECOOP 2018 Workshops, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2018, p. 46-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Market demands for faster delivery and higher software quality are progressively becoming more stringent. A key hindrance for software companies to meet such demands is how to test the software due to to the intrinsic costs of development, maintenance and evolution of testware. Especially since testware should be defined, and aligned, with all layers of system under test (SUT), including all graphical user interface (GUI) abstraction levels. These levels can be tested with different generations of GUI-based test approaches, where 2nd generation, or Layout-based, tests leverage GUI properties and 3rd generation, or Visual, tests make use of image recognition. The two approaches provide different benefits and drawbacks and are seldom used together because of the aforementioned costs, despite growing academic evidence of the complementary benefits. In this work we propose the proof of concept of a novel two-step translation approach for Android GUI testing that we aim to implement, where a translator first creates a technology independent script with actions and elements of the GUI, and then translates it to a script with the syntax chosen by the user. The approach enables users to translate Layout-based to Visual scripts and vice versa, to gain the benefits (e.g. robustness, speed and ability to emulate the user) of both generations, whilst minimizing the drawbacks (e.g. development and maintenance costs). We outline our approach from a technical perspective, discuss some of the key challenges with the realization of our approach, evaluate the feasibility and the advantages provided by our approach on an open-source Android application, and discuss the potential industrial impact of this work. © 2018 ACM.

  • 9.
    Borg, Markus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, SWE.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Papatheocharous, Efi
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, SWE.
    Shah, Syed Muhammad Ali
    iZettle, SWE.
    Axelsson, Jakob
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, SWE.
    Selecting component sourcing options: A survey of software engineering's broader make-or-buy decisions2019In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 112, p. 18-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Component-based software engineering (CBSE) is a common approach to develop and evolve contemporary software systems. When evolving a system based on components, make-or-buy decisions are frequent, i.e., whether to develop components internally or to acquire them from external sources. In CBSE, several different sourcing options are available: (1) developing software in-house, (2) outsourcing development, (3) buying commercial-off-the-shelf software, and (4) integrating open source software components. Objective: Unfortunately, there is little available research on how organizations select component sourcing options (CSO) in industry practice. In this work, we seek to contribute empirical evidence to CSO selection. Method: We conduct a cross-domain survey on CSO selection in industry, implemented as an online questionnaire. Results: Based on 188 responses, we find that most organizations consider multiple CSOs during software evolution, and that the CSO decisions in industry are dominated by expert judgment. When choosing between candidate components, functional suitability acts as an initial filter, then reliability is the most important quality. Conclusion: We stress that future solution-oriented work on decision support has to account for the dominance of expert judgment in industry. Moreover, we identify considerable variation in CSO decision processes in industry. Finally, we encourage software development organizations to reflect on their decision processes when choosing whether to make or buy components, and we recommend using our survey for a first benchmarking. © 2019

  • 10.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Papatheocharous, Efi
    RISE SICS AB, SWE.
    Borg, Markus
    RISE SICS AB, SWE.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wnuk, Krzysztof
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Component selection in Software Engineering: Which attributes are the most important in the decision process?2018In: EUROMICRO Conference Proceedings, IEEE conference proceedings, 2018, p. 198-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract— Component-based software engineering is a common approach to develop and evolve contemporary software systems where different component sourcing options are available: 1)Software developed internally (in-house), 2)Software developed outsourced, 3)Commercial of the shelf software, and 4) Open Source Software. However, there is little available research on what attributes of a component are the most important ones when selecting new components. The object of the present study is to investigate what matters the most to industry practitioners during component selection. We conducted a cross-domain anonymous survey with industry practitioners involved in component selection. First, the practitioners selected the most important attributes from a list. Next, they prioritized their selection using the Hundred-Dollar ($100) test. We analyzed the results using Compositional Data Analysis. The descriptive results showed that Cost was clearly considered the most important attribute during the component selection. Other important attributes for the practitioners were: Support of the component, Longevity prediction, and Level of off-the-shelf fit to product. Next an exploratory analysis was conducted based on the practitioners’ inherent characteristics. Nonparametric tests and biplots were used. It seems that smaller organizations and more immature products focus on different attributes than bigger organizations and mature products which focus more on Cost

  • 11.
    Nass, Michel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Feldt, Robert
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Augmented testing: Industry feedback to shape a new testing technology2019In: Proceedings - 2019 IEEE 12th International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation Workshops, ICSTW 2019, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019, p. 176-183Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual testing is the most commonly used approach in the industry today for acceptance-and system-testing of software applications. Test automation has been suggested to address drawbacks with manual testing but both test automation and manual testing have several challenges that limit their return of investment for system-and acceptance-test automation. Hence, there is still an industrial need for another approach to testing that can mitigate the challenges associated with system-and acceptance-testing and make it more efficient and cost effective for the industry. In this paper we present a novel technique we refer to as Augmented Testing (AT). AT is defined as testing through a visual layer between the tester and the System Under Test (SUT) that superimposes information on top of the GUI. We created a prototype for AT and performed an industrial workshop study with 10 software developers to get their perceived benefits and drawbacks of AT. The benefits and drawbacks will be useful for further development of the technique and prototype for AT. The workshop study identified more benefits than drawbacks with AT. Two of the identified benefits were: 'Know what to test and what has been tested' and 'Less manual work'. Due to these results, we believe that AT is a promising technique that deserves more research since it may provide industry with new benefits that current techniques lack. © 2019 IEEE.

  • 12.
    Yu, Liang
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Chatzipetrou, Panagiota
    Örebro universitet, SWE.
    Gorschek, Tony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Utilising CI environment for efficient and effective testing of NFRs2020In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 117, article id 106199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Continuous integration (CI) is a practice that aims to continuously verify quality aspects of a software intensive system both for functional and non-functional requirements (NFRs). Functional requirements are the inputs of development and can be tested in isolation, utilising either manual or automated tests. In contrast, some NFRs are difficult to test without functionality, for NFRs are often aspects of functionality and express quality aspects. Lacking this testability attribute makes NFR testing complicated and, therefore, underrepresented in industrial practice. However, the emergence of CI has radically affected software development and created new avenues for software quality evaluation and quality information acquisition. Research has, consequently, been devoted to the utilisation of this additional information for more efficient and effective NFR verification. Objective: We aim to identify the state-of-the-art of utilising the CI environment for NFR testing, hereinafter referred to as CI-NFR testing. Method: Through rigorous selection, from an initial set of 747 papers, we identified 47 papers that describe how NFRs are tested in a CI environment. Evidence-based analysis, through coding, is performed on the identified papers in this SLR. Results: Firstly, ten CI approaches are described by the papers selected, each describing different tools and nine different NFRs where reported to be tested. Secondly, although possible, CI-NFR testing is associated with eight challenges that adversely affect its adoption. Thirdly, the identified CI-NFR testing processes are tool-driven, but there is a lack of NFR testing tools that can be used in the CI environment. Finally, we proposed a CI framework for NFRs testing. Conclusion: A synthesised CI framework is proposed for testing various NFRs, and associated CI tools are also mapped. This contribution is valuable as results of the study also show that CI-NFR testing can help improve the quality of NFR testing in practices. © 2019

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