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  • 1.
    Ketzer, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), DEU.
    Schlyter, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Weinberger, Nora
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), DEU.
    Rösch, Christine
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), DEU.
    Driving and restraining forces for the implementation of the Agrophotovoltaics system technology: A system dynamics analysis2020In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 270, article id 110864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The innovative Agrophotovoltaics (APV) system technology combines agricultural biomass and solar power production on the same site and aims at reducing the conflict between food and power production. Unrelated to this benefit, this technology may impact the landscape negatively and could thus be subject to public opposition and/or restraining frameworks. The presented study offers a System Dynamics (SD) approach, through Causal Loop Diagrams (CLDs) models, based on the results of citizen workshops, literature research, and expert discussions on the technology. A comprehensive analysis of the driving and restraining forces for the implementation of APV-technology and expected or potential impacts reveals influential factors. Hence, this SD approach identifies bottlenecks and conflicting objectives in the technology implementation that need to be further addressed. A key finding is that successful APV-projects would require stakeholder involvement to achieve greater local acceptance. When it comes to production on agricultural land, APV-systems may drive the land use efficiency to up to 186 percent when the PV-panels serve for protection against heat stress. On the other hand, altered precipitation patterns and impacts on agricultural cultivation and, especially, the landscape caused by the technical system, may restrain the application of APV. Finally, system design factors and operator modes are amongst the criteria that may influence the local acceptance in society, farmers’ motivation for APV and economic factors for the market launch of APV. © 2020 The Authors

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    Driving and restraining forces for the implementation of the Agrophotovoltaics system technology
  • 2.
    Nedelciu, Claudiu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, SWE.
    Ragnarsdottir, Kristín
    University of Iceland, ISL.
    Schlyter, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Stjernquist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, SWE.
    Global phosphorus supply chain dynamics: Assessing regional impact to 20502020In: Global Food Security, ISSN 2211-9124, Vol. 26, article id 100426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) availability is essential for global food security. A system dynamics model running from 1961 to 2050 was built for this study, linking global P supply to social, economic and environmental dynamics at regional level. Simulation results show that phosphate rock (PR) production needs to double by 2050 compared to present levels, in order to match regional P requirements. South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa are regions highly dependent on phosphate imports, yet it is here that most of the population growth and future P requirement will occur. Climate impact, eutrophication and phosphogypsum production are some of the main negative environmental dynamics that are becoming increasingly challenging in the coming decades. © 2020 The Authors

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    Global phosphorus supply chain dynamics
  • 3.
    Schlyter, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Stjernquist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University.
    Managing Forestry in a Sustainable Manner: The Importance of System Analysis2022In: Transformation Literacy: Pathways to Regenerative Civilizations / [ed] Petra Künkel, Kristin Vala Ragnarsdottir, Springer, 2022, p. 145-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines from systems and livelihood perspectives, with Nemoral and Boreal forest zones of the Global North and Sweden as examples, how forestry may meet current and future sustainability challenges both as a traditional resource base and with respect to other ecosystem services. Previous and current forest policy/governance is briefly described against the background that Swedish forestry is based both on huge holdings by few industrial owners as well as on a multitude of small individual, often family owned, forest estates. Successful delivery against environmental objectives will require careful balancing of interests and the active participation of local forest owners. Cumulative effects of old and new societal demands on forestry and their impact on local livelihoods poses in this respect a systemic risk as economic and social sustainability often gets limited consideration. There is a need for a more synoptic and systemic analysis of how forestry is affected by multiple, partly contradictory, demands from an increasing array of stakeholders, in order to enable a move towards a biobased economy. Stakeholder-based group modelling is a potentially powerful analytic and conflict reducing approach that could help improve forestry’s contribution to the acute need to handle the climate change and current sustainability challenges.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Österlin, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, SWE.
    Schlyter, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Stjernquist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, SWE.
    Different worldviews as impediments to integrated nature and cultural heritage conservation management: experiences from protected areas in Northern Sweden2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 3533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the management of protected nature areas, arguments are being raised for increasingly integrated approaches. Despite an explicit ambition from the responsible managing governmental agencies, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and Swedish National Heritage Board, attempts to initiate and increase the degree of integrated nature and cultural heritage conservation management in the Swedish mountains are failing. The delivery of environmental policy through the Swedish National Environmental Objective called Magnificent Mountains is dependent on increased collaboration between the state and local stakeholders. This study, using a group model building approach, maps out the system's dynamic interactions between nature perceptions, values and the objectives of managing agencies and local stakeholders. It is identified that the dominance of a wilderness discourse influences both the objectives and management of the protected areas. This wilderness discourse functions as a barrier against including cultural heritage conservation aspects and local stakeholders in management, as wilderness-influenced objectives are defining protected areas as environments "untouched" by humans. A wilderness objective reduces the need for local knowledge and participation in environmental management. In reality, protected areas depend, to varying degrees, on the continuation of traditional land-use practices. © 2020 by the authors.

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    Different worldviews as impediments to integrated nature and cultural heritage conservation management: experiences from protected areas in Northern Sweden
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