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  • 1.
    Berglund Snodgrass, Lina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Nord, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    The Continuation of Dwelling: Safety as a Situated Effect of Multi-Actor Interactions Within Extra-Care Housing in Sweden2019In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 171-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the space–time situatedness of residing within extra-care housing (ECH) in Sweden. EHC constitutes an example of ordinary housing but is often categorized, along with senior housing, as “in-between housing.” What differentiates the extra-care housing from the ordinary is an age limit for moving in, the provision of communal facilities, and the presence of staff at certain times each week. Two housings with different environmental and architectural conditions have been analyzed through spatial analyses, observations, and interviews with residents (n = 18). The article concludes that the two different assemblings enabled two very different possibilities for accessing “safe aging.” One offered opportunities for the continuation of identities which contributed to feelings of safety, and one demanded the reconstitution of identities for developing meaning in the new housing.

  • 2.
    Mahrs Träff, AnnSofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, SWE.
    Cedersund, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, SWE.
    Nord, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Perceptions of physical activity among elderly residents and professionals in assisted living facilities2017In: European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1813-7253, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity is often described as being important for people of all ages, but what different people mean when they talk about physical activity is unclear. Method: A phenomenographic method was used to analyze how 13 older people and 17 professionals answer the question, “If I say physical activity, what does the concept mean to you?” as part of semi-structured interviews conducted in four assisted living facilities in two different municipalities. Results: We identified a number of different perceptions of physical activity, with the older people and professionals having different responses. Elderly and professionals alike, define physical activity as a requirement for life and as an opportunity to maintain the body although they define the concepts in different ways. Elderly define the concept as a way to create meaning and the professionals have the attitude that the concept means everyday activities. Conclusion: The concept of physical activity may be defined in many different ways. This study has shown that elderly and professionals do not define physical activity in the same way. Therefore, professionals need to be aware of these differences when talking with elderly about individual needs in everyday life.

  • 3.
    Nord, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Resident-centred care and architecture of two different types of caring residences: a comparative study2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1472499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between architectural space and resident-centred care is poorly understood, even though architectural space is indicated as an important factor in the quality of care. This paper aims to address this gap in existing research by putting resident-centred care in the theoretical context of relationality and emergence in which space is a co-producing component. This qualitative case study includes two housing alternatives, which are compared: one assisted living and one extra-care housing residence, which differ in their legal status and architecturally. Similar fieldwork was carried out in the two residences. Individual interviews with staff and residents, as well as observations—direct and shadowing—were the main data collection methods. The concept of assemblage was used for the analysis of how resident-centred care and architectural space co-evolved. The findings show that resident-centred care appears in similar but also diverse and sometimes contradictory ways in different spaces in the two housing alternatives, suggesting that resident-centred care is situated, volatile and emergent. Although architecture has strong agency, space and care need to be considered together—a caring architecture—in order to understand the nuances and rich conceptual palette of resident-centred care. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 4.
    Nord, Catharina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Högström, EbbaBlekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Caring Architecture: Institutions and Relational Practices2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Architecture is hard stuff. It is formed by walls, roofs, floors, all components of hard materials, stone, glass and wood. It distributes people in space and directs their doings and movements. Institutions are even harder stuff. Order is pushed a step further by the coerciveness of discursive architectural models and caring practices, restricting options to certain ways of thinking and acting. This book sets out to illuminate how people and spaces negotiate, and often challenge, regularities and patterns embedded in the meeting between architecture and institutions. It contains a number of essays by authors from disciplines such as human geography, architecture, planning, design, social work and education. The essays discuss different examples from institutions in which care is carried out; assisted living facilities, residential care for children, psychiatric care facilities and hospitals. By adopting a non-representational perspective, emergent practices render visible capacities of being flexible and mouldable, in which institutional architecture is defied, contested and transformed. New situations appear which transgress physical space in partnership with those who populate it, whether humans or non-humans. This book reveals the relational and transformative conditions of care architecture and the way in which institutions transform (or not) into Caring Architecture.

  • 5.
    Severinsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Reimers, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Ambiguous spaces for troubled youth: Home, therapeutic institution or school?2014In: Pedagogy, Culture & Society, ISSN 1468-1366, E-ISSN 1747-5104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, students that schools are unable to handle are removed from their local environments and sometimes from their parental homes and moved to rural residential care homes. Although ‘home’ and ‘school’ are clearly considered places where problems exist, it is not these places that are scrutinised and subjected to change, but the students. How do the change of place and the performance of the alternative ‘home’ and alternative ‘school’ contribute to the students’ adjustment? In this article we explore the significance of place in these measures and ask questions about how possibilities for agency and subjectivities are produced.  The article is based on an ethnographic study of two residential care homes for troubled youth, aged 12 to 15. The results show how complex assemblages produce opportunities and limitations for care and education and how location and buildings partake in the constitution of possible subjectivities and agency. The analysis inspired by Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can capture mobility and flow, an important aspect when studying complexity. This kind of analysis enables a study of the complex arrangements for disadvantaged youth that takes into consideration not just social interactions but also materiality.

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