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  • 1. Capozza, Korey
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Black, Jeff
    Bello, Nelly
    Lence, Clare
    Oostema, Steve
    North, Christie
    Going Mobile With Diabetes Support: A Randomized Study of a Text Message–Based Personalized Behavioral Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes Self-Care2015Inngår i: Diabetes Spectrum, ISSN 1040-9165, E-ISSN 1944-7353, Vol. 28, nr 2, s. 83-91Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Patients with type 2 diabetes often fail to achieve self-management goals. This study tested the impact on glycemic control of a two-way text messaging program that provided behavioral coaching, education, and testing reminders to enrolled individuals with type 2 diabetes in the context of a clinic-based quality improvement initiative. The secondary aim examined patient interaction and satisfaction with the program.

    Methods. Ninety-three adult patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (A1C >8%) were recruited from 18 primary care clinics in three counties for a 6-month study. Patients were randomized by a computer to one of two arms. Patients in both groups continued with their usual care; patients assigned to the intervention arm also received from one to seven diabetes-related text messages per day depending on the choices they made at enrollment. At 90 and 180 days, A1C data were obtained from the electronic health record and analyzed to determine changes from baseline for both groups. An exit survey was used to assess satisfaction. Enrollment behavior and interaction data were pulled from a Web-based administrative portal maintained by the technology vendor.

    Results. Patients used the program in a variety of ways. Twenty-nine percent of program users demonstrated frequent engagement (texting responses at least three times per week) for a period of ≥90 days. Survey results indicate very high satisfaction with the program. Both groups’ average A1C decreased from baseline, possibly reflecting a broader quality improvement effort underway in participating clinics. At 90 and 180 days, there was no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of change in A1C (P >0.05).

    Conclusions. This study demonstrated a practical approach to implementing and monitoring a mobile health intervention for self-management support across a wide range of independent clinic practices.

  • 2.
    Eriksen, Sara
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Hofflander, Malin
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskaper, Institutionen för hälsa.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskaper, Institutionen för hälsa. Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Dept Design Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Health in Hand: Putting mHealth Design in Context2014Inngår i: 2014 IEEE 2ND INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON USABILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY FOCUSED REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING (USARE), 2014, s. 36-39Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless technologies, cloud computing and connectivity have enabled mobile services that extend the coverage of health services, resulting in a branch of eHealth now commonly referred to as mHealth. However, at least in Sweden, where the healthcare sector is heavily institutionalized and regulated, mHealth has so far mainly evolved in the form of applications for support of healthy life-style and self-management of chronic diseases, implemented outside of the firewalls of traditional healthcare delivery environments. In this paper we present an on-going Indo-Swedish research and development project in which we are putting mHealth design into context both from a patient's perspective and from the perspective of a healthcare team working within a professional healthcare organization. Our research approach is inspired by the Scandinavian tradition of Participatory Design of ICT and informed by studies of how to measure usability, user experience and impact of mHealth interventions. The involved research teams are multi-disciplinary, including researchers from engineering, computing and health sciences. The project includes, on the Swedish side, a partner from the public healthcare sector, three SME:s and an industrial partner who is currently providing Electronic Patient Record and other healthcare information system solutions and who is interested in developing mobile solutions for healthcare professionals. We are currently in the process of collaborative articulation and specification of problems, goals and requirements within the framework of the first Swedish case study of the project, focused on mobile support for patients with diabetes type 2 and their healthcare teams.

  • 3.
    Eriksén, Sara
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Lundberg, Jenny
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för tillämpad signalbehandling.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskaper, Institutionen för hälsa.
    Hofflander, Malin
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskaper, Institutionen för hälsa.
    Borg, Christel
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskaper, Institutionen för hälsa.
    Transforming Healthcare Delivery: ICT Design for Self-Care of Type 2 Diabetes2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we present an on-going case study where the aim is to design and implement mobile technologies for self-care for patients with type 2 diabetes. The main issue we are addressing in this paper is how to bridge clinical and non-clinical settings when designing self-care technologies. Usability, User Experience and Participatory Design are central aspects of our research approach. For designing with and for patients in home settings and everyday life situations, this approach has so far not been problematic. However, when it comes to designing with and for user groups located within a large healthcare organization, in a highly institutionalized clinical setting, the situation is different. We have recently introduced the Health Usability Maturity Model (UMM) to our project partners as a potential tool for bringing usability and participa-tory design issues to the fore as strategic assets for transforming healthcare delivery with ICT.

  • 4.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Weir, Charlene
    A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support2016Inngår i: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, ISSN 1538-2931, E-ISSN 1538-9774, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 77-84Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. 

  • 5.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Quantifying usability: an evaluation of a diabetes mHealth system on effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction metrics with associated user characteristics2016Inngår i: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 5-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Mobile health (mHealth) systems are becoming more common for chronic disease management, but usability studies are still needed on patients' perspectives and mHealth interaction performance. This deficiency is addressed by our quantitative usability study of a mHealth diabetes system evaluating patients' task performance, satisfaction, and the relationship of these measures to user characteristics. Materials and Methods We used metrics in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 standard. After standardized training, 10 patients performed representative tasks and were assessed on individual task success, errors, efficiency (time on task), satisfaction (System Usability Scale [SUS]) and user characteristics. Results Tasks of exporting and correcting values proved the most difficult, had the most errors, the lowest task success rates, and consumed the longest times on task. The average SUS satisfaction score was 80.5, indicating good but not excellent system usability. Data trends showed males were more successful in task completion, and younger participants had higher performance scores. Educational level did not influence performance, but a more recent diabetes diagnosis did. Patients with more experience in information technology (IT) also had higher performance rates. Discussion Difficult task performance indicated areas for redesign. Our methods can assist others in identifying areas in need of improvement. Data about user background and IT skills also showed how user characteristics influence performance and can provide future considerations for targeted mHealth designs. Conclusion Using the ISO 9241-11 usability standard, the SUS instrument for satisfaction and measuring user characteristics provided objective measures of patients' experienced usability. These could serve as an exemplar for standardized, quantitative methods for usability studies on mHealth systems.

  • 6.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Toward Patient-centered, Standardized, and Reproducible Approaches of Evaluating the Usability of mHealth Chronic Disease Self-management Systems for Diabetes2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting 422 million patients worldwide according to World Health Organization data with 30.3 million in the United States and 64 million in Europe. The prevalence speaks to the need for improved ways to support patients in disease self-management. mHealth solutions are increasingly used for this; however, usability is a current challenge affecting patients’ mHealth use. Recent literature emphasizes an increased focus on patient-centeredness in diabetes care, user-centeredness in chronic disease mHealth system design and standardized, systematic approaches for usability evaluation. The aim of this thesis and its individual studies was to incorporate these foci into the evaluation of two mobile health self-management systems for diabetes.

    Study I used ISO standard 9241-11 to examine the relationship between selected group characteristics of diabetes patients on specific interaction outcomes to quantitatively identify needed system modifications. Study II utilized a multi-method design to assess diabetes patients’ mHealth usage and combined two novel analytic methods to structure and analyze results. Study III used a modified, user-oriented heuristic evaluation (HE) method, validated tasks and in-depth severity factor ratings to identify critical problems from patients’ point of view. By developing and employing a modified, user-centered cognitive walkthrough method (UC-CW), study IV assessed its effectiveness and efficiency in finding relevant usability problems for users as well as patients’ acceptance. The modified CW was validated against the golden-standard user test with Think Aloud.

    Study I emphasized the importance of considering user characteristics in mHealth performance as these influenced interaction outcomes. All patients had difficulties with multiple-step tasks. Patients more recently diagnosed were able to perform tasks more successfully, with fewer errors and at faster times and had higher satisfaction scores; similar outcomes to the more experienced users. Educational level did not, however, seem to influence performance. In study II, the usability test with Think-Aloud (TA), in-depth interviews and questionnaires contributed to 19 consolidated issues, and triangulated on 5 critical usability problems for users. The combined analysis methods resulted in structured, categorized descriptions to aid in problem-solving. In Study III, the disease-related, critical information deficiencies found by expert evaluators using the modified, structured method also converged on and highlighted potentially adverse user concerns. Study IV demonstrated that the UC-CW found more critical user problems compared to the user test with TA despite both methods producing similar major average severity ratings and violations of heuristic categories. The modified method was more efficient per detected problem and experienced as less cognitively demanding and with a higher ease of use.

    These studies offer different approaches that include patient-centered, efficient and user-acceptable methods and method modifications to detect critical usability issues for users. Importantly, improved mHealth designs for users could mean improvement in interactions, interaction performance, increased adoption, and long-term perhaps even increased adherence to interventions for chronic conditions.

  • 7.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Using activity theory as a framework for the usability evaluation process and task determination in mhealth self-management systems for diabetes2018Inngår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press , 2018, Vol. 249, s. 158-163Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    mHealth systems can be used for patients in their diabetes selfmanagement, but usability evaluations are often needed to determine how to make them more useful for the diabetes patient user in the monitoring and managing of their disease. Activity Theory (AT) was developed within Russian psychology to define the work and activity process in an activity system. AT was here considered to also be a particularly suitable framework for inspiration in usability evaluation both for the whole evaluation process and also for the usability task determination in this process for diabetes patient users. In the following paper, examples are provided from four usability studies using both user-based and expert usability methods in evaluation showing how AT was applied to guide the thoughts in evaluating the usability of two mHealth self-management systems for diabetes. Experiences and insights are provided from this process. © 2018 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Kushniruk, A.
    School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, VIC, Canada.
    Mediating the cognitive walkthrough with patient groups to achieve personalized health in chronic disease self-management system evaluation2016Inngår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 224, s. 146-151Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive walkthrough (CW) is a task-based, expert inspection usability evaluation method involving benefits such as cost effectiveness and efficiency. A drawback of the method is that it doesn’t involve the user perspective from real users but instead is based on experts’ predictions about the usability of the system and how users interact. In this paper, we propose a way of involving the user in an expert evaluation method by modifying the CW with patient groups as mediators. This along with other modifications include a dual domain session facilitator, specific patient groups and three different phases: 1) a preparation phase where suitable tasks are developed by a panel of experts and patients, validated through the content validity index 2) a patient user evaluation phase including an individual and collaborative process part 3) an analysis and coding phase where all data is digitalized and synthesized making use of Qualitative Data Analysis Software (QDAS) to determine usability deficiencies. We predict that this way of evaluating will utilize the benefits of the expert methods, also providing a way of including the patient user of these self-management systems. Results from this prospective study should provide evidence of the usefulness of this method modification. © 2016 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Nancy, Staggers
    An evaluation of patients' experienced usability of a diabetes mHealth system using a multi-method approach2016Inngår i: Journal of Biomedical Informatics, ISSN 1532-0464, E-ISSN 1532-0480, Vol. 59, s. 115-129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 10.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Staggers, N.
    Heuristic evaluation of a mhealth diabetes self-management system using disease specific patient profiles2016Inngår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 225, s. 530-534Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient-centeredness is an important concept in diabetes treatment. We modified Nielsen’s expert heuristic evaluation method addressing common gaps: a patient perspective and variability in findings. Two expert, dual-domain evaluators referred to validated patient profiles (mild, moderate, severe diabetes) when conducting uniform evaluation processes on a diabetes mHealth system. Evaluators found 103 usability problems and 224 heuristic violations. For 69 % of the problems, the profiles had an effect on severity ratings. "Consistency and Standards" (n=57) and "Match between the System and Real World" (n=55) violations dominated at 50%. The overall system severity rating was major. Severity was highest for a severe diabetic profile due to likely visual issues (crowded elements), cognitive concerns (remembering many steps) and for insufficient medication information. Interrater reliability was respectable at Kappa =0.67. Our novel evaluation method represents one way of improving on a usability expert technique making it more patient-centered with less individual evaluator variability. © 2016 IMIA and IOS Press.

  • 11.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Staggers, Nancy
    University of Utah, USA.
    Patients' Perceptions and Experiences of a mHealth Diabetes Self-management System2017Inngår i: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, ISSN 1538-2931, E-ISSN 1538-9774, Vol. 35, nr 3, s. 122-130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic diseases, including diabetes, constitute a substantial disease burden around the world. Mobile self-management systems now play a significant and increasingly important role in patients' disease management. Yet, patients' perceptions of these systems after longer-term use are largely unexplored. A random sample of 10 diabetes patients was assessed immediately after they exited a larger, 6-month randomized controlled trial on the use of a mHealth system called Care4Life. This descriptive, exploratory study assessed patients' perceptions and experiences of mHealth using a questionnaire and semistructured interview whose development was guided by the Technology Acceptance Model. Results indicated that patients saw clear benefits in using the technology and had favorable behavioral disease outcomes after using Care4Life. Suggestions for improving the system were highly individual despite the apparent homogeneity of the patient group. The study begins to fill the gap about the longer-term use of mHealth systems in chronic disease management and reflects the significance of individual needs for mHealth systems.

  • 12.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Staggers, Nancy
    University of Utah, Department of Biomedical Informatics, USA.
    Årsand, Eirik
    The Norwegian Centre for E-health Research, University Hospital of North Norway, NOR.
    Kushniruk, Andre
    University of Victoria, School of Health Information Science, CAN.
    Using a User-centered Cognitive Walkthrough to Evaluate a mHealth Diabetes Self-management System Including a Case Study and External Validity TestManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-management of chronic diseases with mHealth systems is becoming common. With the move toward patient-centered care, it is vital to incorporate patients in the development and evaluation of these systems. Current methods for usability evaluation such as formal usability testing can be very costly and time-consuming. Other methods may be more efficient but lack a user focus (e.g., Heuristic Evaluation (HE) and Cognitive Walkthrough (CW)). We propose a modified method to address identified deficiencies in the original CW technique and then assess its effectiveness efficiency and user acceptance. In this case study we use the modified, user-centered CW (UC-CW) method with diabetes patient users of a mHealth self-management system and validate it against the “golden-standard” user test with Think Aloud (TA) on the number, types and severity of usability problems, as well as the consumed time, and user experience of the cognitive load.

    Materials and methods: A total of 12 diabetes patients were included: 6 in the UC-CW group evaluation session, and 6 in the individual user tests with TA. The setting for the assessments was the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.  The modified UC-CW method consisted of: making the user the main evaluation contributor in finding the usability problems, a dual domain facilitator with the role of guiding the evaluation session and in rating found usability problems, a task development process resulting in validated tasks, a focus on higher level tasks in evaluation and in streamlining the evaluation in terms of time and resources. Users interacted with the mHealth application for both the modified method and user test with TA. Participants also filled in a pre-test questionnaire of demographic questions and one on their experience, knowledge and perception about information technology. Post-evaluation assessments included the NASA RTLX instrument and a set of brief interview questions about the different methods.

    Results: Participants in both methods were a similar mix of males and females with similar types of diabetes. They were equally knowledgeable and experienced in using mobile phones. A total of 26 usability problems were found with the UC-CW and 20 problems with the TA. Participants in both methods gave the application similar severity ratings for all views (UC-CW= 2.7 and TA= 2.6) and a similarly high number of  problems in similar views (Main view [UC-CW=11, TA=10], Carbohydrate Entry view [UC-CW=4, TA= 3] and List view [UC-CW=3, TA=3] and with  similar heuristic violations (Match Between the System and Real World [UC-CW=19, TA=16], Consistency and Standards [UC-CW= 17, TA=15], and Recognition Rather than Recall [UC-CW=13, TA=10]). Both methods converged on 8 usability problems. When comparing the severity of the problems, the UC-CW detected 5 critical issues (severity level 4) while the TA detected two. The distinct issues in the UC-CW compared to the TA were personalized features required for patients’ individual disease needs. In terms of efficiency, the whole evaluation procedure took less time to perform for the TA than the UC-CW. However, when the number of usability problems is considered, the UC-CW was faster. The UC-CW was also faster for the evaluation process. The NASA RTLX scores indicated that participants experienced the UC-CW as half as demanding in terms of cognitive load. Common themes were that the UC-CW was perceived as easy to perform and enjoyable while the TA was considered somewhat awkward and more cognitively demanding.

    Conclusions: The modified method proved useful for finding severe and recurring usability issues for users and highlighted the need for personalized user features. The UC-CW also proved efficient with a high user acceptance. These results indicate that the UC-CW can be a useful method to evaluate a mHealth self-management system for diabetes. The external validation that compared the method outcomes provided beginning evidence of the UC-CW’s utility as an effective, as well as efficient and acceptable method.

  • 13.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Staggers, Nancy
    Summit Health Informatics, USA.
    Årsand, Eirik
    University Hospital of North Norway, NOR.
    Kushniruk, André
    University of Victoria, CAN.
    Employing a user-centered cognitive walkthrough to evaluate a mHealth diabetes self-management application: A case study and beginning method validation2019Inngår i: Journal of Biomedical Informatics, ISSN 1532-0464, E-ISSN 1532-0480, Vol. 91, artikkel-id 103110Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Self-management of chronic diseases using mobile health (mHealth) systems and applications is becoming common. Current evaluation methods such as formal usability testing can be very costly and time-consuming; others may be more efficient but lack a user focus. We propose an enhanced cognitive walkthrough (CW) method, the user-centered CW (UC-CW), to address identified deficiencies in the original technique and perform a beginning validation with think aloud protocol (TA) to assess its effectiveness, efficiency and user acceptance in a case study with diabetes patient users on a mHealth self-management application. Materials and methods: A total of 12 diabetes patients at University of Utah Health, USA, were divided into UC-CW and think aloud (TA) groups. The UC-CW method included: making the user the main evaluator for detecting usability problems, having a dual domain facilitator, and using three other improved processes: validated task development, higher level tasks and a streamlined evaluation process. Users interacted with the same mHealth application for both methods. Post-evaluation assessments included the NASA RTLX instrument and a set of brief interview questions. Results: Participants had similar demographic characteristics. A total of 26 usability problems were identified with the UC-CW and 20 with TA. Both methods produced similar ratings: severity across all views (UC-CW = 2.7 and TA = 2.6), numbers of problems in the same views (Main View [UC-CW = 11, TA = 10], Carbohydrate Entry View [UC-CW = 4, TA = 3] and List View [UC-CW = 3, TA = 3]) with similar heuristic violations (Match Between the System and Real World [UC-CW = 19, TA = 16], Consistency and Standards [UC-CW = 17, TA = 15], and Recognition Rather than Recall [UC-CW = 13, TA = 10]). Both methods converged on eight usability problems, but the UC-CW group detected five critical issues while the TA group identified two. The UC-CW group identified needed personalized features for patients’ disease needs not identified with TA. UC-CW was more efficient on average time per identified usability problem and on the total evaluation process with patients. NASA RTLX scores indicated that participants experienced the UC-CW half as cognitively demanding. Common themes from interviews indicated the UC-CW as enjoyable and easy to perform while TA was considered somewhat awkward and more cognitively challenging. Conclusions: UC-CW was effective for finding severe, recurring usability problems and it highlighted the need for personalized user features. The method was also efficient and had high user acceptance. These results indicate UC-CW's utility and user acceptance in evaluating a mHealth self-management application. It provides an additional usability evaluation technique for researchers. © 2019

  • 14.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Weir, Charlene
    Staggers, Nancy
    Revisiting Heuristic Evaluation Methods to Improve the Reliability of Findings2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The heuristic evaluation (HE) method is one of the most common in the suite of tools for usability evaluations because it is a fast, inexpensive and resource-efficient process in relation to the many usability issues it generates. The method emphasizes completely independent initial expert evaluations. Inter-rater reliability and agreement coefficients are not calculated. The variability across evaluators, even dual domain experts, can be significant as is seen in the case study here. The implications of this wide variability mean that results are unique to each HE, results are not readily reproducible and HE research on usability is not yet creating a uniform body of knowledge. We offer recommendations to improve the science by incorporating selected techniques from qualitative research: calculating inter-rater reliability and agreement scores, creating a codebook to define concepts/categories and offering crucial information about raters' backgrounds, agreement techniques and the evaluation setting.

  • 15. Peltonen, L.-M.
    et al.
    Alhuwail, D.
    Ali, S.
    Badger, M.K.
    Eler, G.J.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Islam, T.
    Jeon, E.
    Jung, H.
    Kuo, C.-H.
    Lewis, A.
    Pruinelli, L.
    Ronquillo, C.
    Sarmiento, R.F.
    Sommer, J.
    Tayaben, J.L.
    Topaz, M.
    Current trends in nursing informatics: Results of an international survey2016Inngår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Sermeus W.,Weber P.,Procter P.M., IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 225, s. 938-939Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing informatics (NI) can help provide effective and safe healthcare. This study aimed to describe current research trends in NI. In the summer 2015, the IMIA-NI Students Working Group created and distributed an online international survey of the current NI trends. A total of 402 responses were submitted from 44 countries. We identified a top five NI research areas: standardized terminologies, mobile health, clinical decision support, patient safety and big data research. NI research funding was considered to be difficult to acquire by the respondents. Overall, current NI research on education, clinical practice, administration and theory is still scarce, with theory being the least common. Further research is needed to explain the impact of these trends and the needs from clinical practice. © 2016 IMIA and IOS Press.

  • 16. Peltonen, L.-M.
    et al.
    Topaz, M.
    Ronquillo, C.
    Pruinelli, L.
    Sarmiento, R.F.
    Badger, M.K.
    Ali, S.
    Lewis, A.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Jeon, E.
    Tayaben, J.L.
    Kuo, C.-H.
    Islam, T.
    Sommer, J.
    Jung, H.
    Eler, G.J.
    Alhuwail, D.
    Nursing informatics research priorities for the future: Recommendations from an international survey2016Inngår i: NURSING INFORMATICS 2016: EHEALTH FOR ALL: EVERY LEVEL COLLABORATION - FROM PROJECT TO REALIZATION, IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 225, s. 222-226Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We present one part of the results of an international survey exploring current and future nursing informatics (NI) research trends. The study was conducted by the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA-NISIG) Student Working Group. Based on findings from this cross-sectional study, we identified future NI research priorities. We used snowball sampling technique to reach respondents from academia and practice. Data were collected between August and September 2015. Altogether, 373 responses from 44 countries were analyzed. The identified top ten NI trends were big data science, standardized terminologies (clinical evaluation/implementation), education and competencies, clinical decision support, mobile health, usability, patient safety, data exchange and interoperability, patient engagement, and clinical quality measures. Acknowledging these research priorities can enhance successful future development of NI to better support clinicians and promote health internationally. © 2016 IMIA and IOS Press.

  • 17. Roberts, Kirk
    et al.
    Boland, Mary Regina
    Pruinelli, Lisiane
    Dcruz, Jina
    Berry, Andrew
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Hazen, Rebecca
    Sarmiento, Raymond F
    Backonja, Uba
    Yu, Kun-Hsing
    Jiang, Yun
    Brennan, Patricia Flatley
    Biomedical informatics advancing the national health agenda: the AMIA 2015 year-in-review in clinical and consumer informatics.2017Inngår i: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. E1, s. E185-E190Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of biomedical informatics experienced a productive 2015 in terms of research. In order to highlight the accomplishments of that research, elicit trends, and identify shortcomings at a macro level, a 19-person team conducted an extensive review of the literature in clinical and consumer informatics. The result of this process included a year-in-review presentation at the American Medical Informatics Association Annual Symposium and a written report (see supplemental data). Key findings are detailed in the report and summarized here. This article organizes the clinical and consumer health informatics research from 2015 under 3 themes: the electronic health record (EHR), the learning health system (LHS), and consumer engagement. Key findings include the following: (1) There are significant advances in establishing policies for EHR feature implementation, but increased interoperability is necessary for these to gain traction. (2) Decision support systems improve practice behaviors, but evidence of their impact on clinical outcomes is still lacking. (3) Progress in natural language processing (NLP) suggests that we are approaching but have not yet achieved truly interactive NLP systems. (4) Prediction models are becoming more robust but remain hampered by the lack of interoperable clinical data records. (5) Consumers can and will use mobile applications for improved engagement, yet EHR integration remains elusive.

  • 18. Topaz, M.
    et al.
    Ronquillo, C.
    Peltonen, L.-M.
    Pruinelli, L.
    Sarmiento, R.F.
    Badger, M.K.
    Ali, S.
    Lewis, A.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för datavetenskaper, Institutionen för kreativa teknologier.
    Jeon, E.
    Tayaben, J.L.
    Kuo, C.-H.
    Islam, T.
    Sommer, J.
    Jung, H.
    Eler, G.J.
    Alhuwail, D.
    Advancing nursing informatics in the next decade: Recommendations from an international survey2016Inngår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 225, s. 123-127Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders=272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade. © 2016 IMIA and IOS Press.

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