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  • 101.
    Nikulina, Varvara
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Lindal, Johan
    Mistra Urban Futures, SWE.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Simon, David
    Mistra Urban Futures, SWE.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lost in translation: a framework for analysing complexity of co-production settings in relation to epistemic communities, language and culture.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning in modern urban environments requires skills to address complexity in order to move towards sustainability. Co-production of knowledge in transdisciplinary groups was found to be a useful tool in such contexts. Using the concepts of multilingualism, epistemic communities and culture, the article proposed a conceptual framework for analysing complexity of co-production settings, as an indispensable means of managing complex challenges. The framework was evaluated based on inclusiveness, cross-sectoral understanding, applicability in different contexts and time perspectives. Moreover, it was compared to other studies. Based on the framework, several suggestions to maintain were put forth for a process leader (facilitator) when preparing for a co-production process: linguistic equality between participants, disciplinary integrity, a working culture of mutual respect, simultaneous mitigation and informed facilitation. Finally, the article suggested possible future research questions, related to development of the framework: identification of levels of complexity and mapping specific tools to address complexity at each level; integration of other factors of diversity, such as gender, age, as well as political and institutional contexts.

  • 102.
    Nikulina, Varvara
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Simon, David
    Mistra Urban Futures, SWE.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Context-adapted urban planning for rapid transitioning of personal mobility towards sustainability: a systematic literature review2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 1007Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability related challenges in mobility planning have been recognised at the international level and the urgency for change has been widely discussed among scholars. However, there seems to be no general agreement on the best ways of pursuing such change. To seek answers to the question of how to pursue change, this study analysed the development of the broad research fields of mobility, urban planning and transitions, and the overlap of these bodies of literature. Both academic and non-academic literatures were covered. By means of a systematic literature review, as well as bibliometric studies, several prominent research themes that address change from planning and transition perspectives were identified. Moreover, these themes describe different viewpoints and challenges in mobility planning. These include planning and policy for sustainable mobility and accessibility, backcasting and scenario planning, indicators in planning, modes of transport, decision-making, studies of global North and global South, as well as overarching themes of equity, equality and justice, roles of institutions, and co-production of knowledge. Strategies for staying up to date with these fields were also identified. In the literature covered, the temporal dimension in mobility planning was described in four different ways, but little was found about how accelerated transitions towards sustainable mobility can be achieved. Further knowledge gaps were identified in relation to behavioural change, policy development, institutionalisation of planning capacity and social sustainability in mobility planning. This created an outline for possible future studies.

  • 103.
    Nordström, Lina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Runesson, Lars
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Warnecke, Helena
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Light a Spark! Addressing Barriers and Enablers to Increase Demand of Electric Vehicles in Southeast Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Personal Transportation System safeguards peoples’ cultural understanding of freedom: to move individually without being dependent on others. However, the increasing number of private vehicles driven on fossil fuels contributes to unsustainability and one of the most urgent issues, climate change. The authors explored electric vehicles as an alternative to fossil fuel driven vehicles as a way of moving strategically towards sustainability in the Personal Transportation System. In order to increase demand of electric vehicles, barriers need to be overcome. The authors identified perceived barriers and enablers through literature review, interviews with automobile dealers and other stakeholders of the EV sector in Southeast Sweden, as well as through an electronic survey of individuals living in this region. The outcome of the thesis is a pilot strategy using behavior change tools from Community-Based Social Marketing in order to address the perceived barriers and enablers on the demand side of the electric vehicle market. With highly positive attitudes towards electric vehicles in Southeast Sweden, the strategy may be successful in the region; however, it needs to be combined with further measures on the supply side of the market which cannot be addressed with behavior change tools.

  • 104.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    An Approach to Business Modeling for Sustainable Personal Road Transport2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1950 and 2013 the total amount of Swedish travelling has increased from about 20 billion to about 140 billion passenger kilometers. This included an increase in travelling with private cars from about 3 billion to about 105 billion passenger kilometers, and in bus travelling from about 2.5 billion to about 5 billion passenger kilometers. The European commission has indicated that public transportation (if powered by clean fuels) is a suitable way to reduce environmental and health problems.

     

    This thesis focuses on sustainable personal road transport, and aims to develop and test a new approach to examining the economic and socio-ecological sustainability effects of various road vehicles for private travelling and related business models. A special focus is set on comparing various bus systems for public transport and ways (business models) for private people to access cars. The main comparison parameters are the total cost of ownership and carbon dioxide emissions of different energy carriers for buses and cars. The Design Research Methodology is used to guide the research approach. The approach also builds on the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, which includes, for example, principles that define any sustainable future and a strategic planning process. The approach first employs Strategic Life Cycle Assessment to give a quick overview of sustainability challenges in each bus life cycle stage from raw materials to end of life. Several analysis tools such as Life Cycle Costing, Life Cycle Analysis, Product Service System, and Business Model Canvas mapping are then iteratively used to ”dig deeper” into identified prioritized challenges. Literature reviews, interviews, and simulations are used as supporting methods.

     

    The results from a first theoretical test of the new approach suggest that a shift from diesel buses to electric buses (powered by renewable energy) could significantly lower carbon dioxide emissions, while also significantly lowering the total cost of ownership. The theoretical calculations were followed up by testing of electric buses in real operation in eight Swedish municipalities. The tests verified the theoretical results, and showed that electric buses are better than diesel buses both from a sustainability point of view and a cost point of view, and also that electric bus operation is a practically viable alternative for public transport. The new approach was tested also by comparing a variety of business models for private car travelling. The results indicate, among other things, that only people who travel more than 13.500 kilometers per year would benefit from owning a car.

     

    In all, the thesis suggests a simultaneous shift from diesel buses to electric buses in public transport and, for the majority of the car drivers that drive less than 13.500 kilometers per year, switching from car ownership to car use services would be favourable for an affordable transition of the transport sector towards sustainability. 

  • 105.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    A sensitivity analysis of total cost of ownership for electric public bus transport systems in Swedish medium sized cities2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reach Swedish national climate change reduction targets, organizations collaborate for a sustainable development to improve energy efficiency, reducing pollution and noise in public bus transport. This follow-up study continues to strengthen the previous study by deepen the economic comparisons of two electric buses with different driving range and different type of chargers. The study aims to emphasize on sensitivity analysis for the total cost of ownership (TCO) to reduce uncertainty by identifying which factors of interest that most likely cause the estimated cost values for the electric bus. The result shows that the percentage change of line distance (km/year), operational years, and investment cost would be the most influential and significant factors on TCO.

  • 106.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Competitiveness and Sustainability Effects of Cars and their Business Models in Swedish Small Town Regions2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 333-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to develop and test a new approach for comparing sustainability effects (mainly approximated through CO2 emissions) and the total cost of ownership of various business models (Regular Purchasing, Car Pooling, Car Leasing, and Taxiing) applied to private cars with different energy carriers (Biogas, Ethanol, Gasoline, Plug-in Hybrid, and Electric). The results indicate that, out of all of the vehicles, electric vehicles are the most competitive—from both an ecological and economic perspective. Moreover, of all of the business models, Car Pooling is the most competitive when driving short to medium distances, reducing CO2 emissions by 20-40% compared with Regular Purchasing. Meanwhile, Car Leasing emits the same amount of CO2 emissions as Regular Purchasing if both are driven the same number of kilometers per year. The results also indicate that, from a cost effectiveness perspective, people who travel less than 2000 km per year should primarily consider using Taxis or similar services, while Car Pooling is most cost effective for those who travel from 2000 to 8500 km. For those who travel between 8500 and 13500 km per year, Car Leasing is the most cost effective, and Regular Purchasing is the best option above 13500 km per year. If most car owners were to accept and adapt to this identified need for a market move towards Car Pooling with Electric Vehicles, necessary transportation could be ensured while significantly reducing the number of cars on the road, whether from Regular Purchasing or Car Leasing, as well as those that run on fossil fuel. This, in turn, would result in less fossil fuel use, fewer emissions, and decreased negative effects on human health.

  • 107.
    Ny, Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Schulte, Jesko
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Vägval 2030: Färdplan för snabbomställning till hållbara persontransporter - kortversionen2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Transportsektorns beroende av fossila bränslen är en av de största utmaningarna ien omställning till ett klimatneutralt och hållbart samhälle.

    Denna färdplansrapport syftar till att undersöka hur elfordonssystem kan bidra tillen snabbomställning till hållbara persontransporter i Småland och Blekinge, samttill att presentera en metodik för vägledning av liknande snabbomställningsarbetei andra regioner och samhällssektorer.

    Detta arbete har övergripande vägletts av en vetenskapligt framtagen och beprövadmetodik för strategisk hållbar utveckling (eng. Framework for Strategic SustainableDevelopment – FSSD). Specifikt ges svar på fyra forskningsfrågor som struktureras irelation till de fyra delsystemen ’Politik och styrmedel’, ’Användare och marknad’,’Fordon och infrastruktur’ samt ’Energi och material’:

    1. Hur skulle en hållbar vision för persontransporter i Småland och Blekinge kunnase ut?

    2. Hur skulle ett etappmål för år 2030 kunna se ut?

    3. Hur ser nuläget ut i förhållande till 2030-målet och visionen?

    4. Hur skulle gapet mellan nuläget, 2030-målet och visionen kunna överbryggas?

    Rapportens resultat visar att dagens fokus på fossilfrihet och klimatåtgärder måstebreddas till hela hållbarhetsfrågan så att även andra hållbarhetsproblemadresseras och så att inte lösningar på vissa hållbarhetsproblem skapar nya.

    Rapporten tydliggör också att det är nödvändigt, praktiskt möjligt och ekonomisktfördelaktigt för Sydostregionen att göra en snabbare hållbarhetsomställning avpersontransporterna än vad som har föreslagits i tidigare studier och utredningar.Det görs även troligt att detsamma gäller för hela transportsystemet och för helaSverige och världen.

    Även geopolitiska fördelar är troliga. En global övergång till transport- ochenergisystem som baseras på energi från fritt tillgängliga flödesresurser som soloch vind istället för fossila bränslen skulle därför sannolikt minska konfliktriskernai världen. Begränsade tillgångar av litium och platina som batteri- ochbränslecellselbilar är beroende av, och andra metaller som behövs till solceller ochvindkraftverk, kan dock ge motsvarande konfliktproblematik. Denna rapportsrekommendationer om minskat transportbehov och bilberoende och dess fokus påresurseffektivitet motverkar detta genom att slå mot bakomliggande resursdrivandemekanismer. Skulle denna färdplan omsättas i praktisk politik så borde alltså denkommande omställningen som ändå är på gång bli betydligt mer ’framtidssäker’.

  • 108.
    Ny, Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Schulte, Jesko
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    On Track for 2030: Roadmap for a fast transition to sustainable personal transport: English short version with foreword by Peter Newman2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transport sector's dependence on fossil fuels is one of the biggest challenges in a shift towards a climate-neutral and sustainable society.

    This roadmap report aims to investigate how electric vehicle systems can contribute to a faster transition to sustainable passenger transport in Southeast Sweden, as well as to present a methodology for guidance of similar work for faster transitions in other regions and sectors.

    This work has been guided by a scientifically designed and proven Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD). Specifically, answers are given to four research questions structured in relation to the four subsystems 'Politics and instruments', 'Users and markets', 'Vehicles and infrastructure' and 'Energy and materials':

    1. What could a sustainable vision for passenger transport in Southeast Sweden look like?
    2. What could be a milestone goal for 2030?
    3. What is the current reality in relation to the 2030 goal and the vision?
    4. How could the gap between the present, 2030 and the vision be bridged?

    The report's results show that today's focus on fossil independence and measures against climate change must be broadened to cover the whole sustainability challengeso that other sustainability issues are addressed and so that solutions to some of the sustainability issues do not create new ones.

    The report also clarifies that it is necessary, practically possible and economically advantageous for Southeast Sweden to make a faster sustainability transition of passenger transportthan what has been proposed in previous studies and investigations. It is also likely that the same applies to the entire transport system and for the whole of Sweden and the world.

    Even geopolitical benefits are likely. A global transition to transport and energy systems based on energy from widely available flow resources like sun and wind instead of the limited fossil fuels would likely reduce the conflicts risks in the world.Restricted cobalt, lithium and platinum resources that battery and fuel cell cars depend on, and other metals needed for solar cells and wind turbines can, however, give rise to similar conflict risks. This roadmap report's recommendations on reduced transport needs and car dependency and its focus on resource efficiency counteract these conflict risks by striking against underlying resource-driving mechanisms. Should this roadmap be translated into practical policies, the forthcoming transition would therefore likely be made considerably more 'future-proof'.

  • 109.
    Ny, Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sven, Borén
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lisiana, Nurhadi
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Schulte, Jesko
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Vägval 2030: färdplan för snabbomställning till hållbara persontransporter2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Transportsektorns beroende av fossila bränslen är en av de största utmaningarna ien omställning till ett klimatneutralt och hållbart samhälle.

    Denna färdplansrapport syftar till att undersöka hur elfordonssystem kan bidra tillen snabbomställning till hållbara persontransporter i Småland och Blekinge, samttill att presentera en metodik för vägledning av liknande snabbomställningsarbetei andra regioner och samhällssektorer.

    Detta arbete har övergripande vägletts av en vetenskapligt framtagen och beprövadmetodik för strategisk hållbar utveckling (eng. Framework for Strategic SustainableDevelopment – FSSD). Specifikt ges svar på fyra forskningsfrågor som struktureras irelation till de fyra delsystemen ’Politik och styrmedel’, ’Användare och marknad’,’Fordon och infrastruktur’ samt ’Energi och material’:

    1. Hur skulle en hållbar vision för persontransporter i Småland och Blekinge kunnase ut?

    2. Hur skulle ett etappmål för år 2030 kunna se ut?

    3. Hur ser nuläget ut i förhållande till 2030-målet och visionen?

    4. Hur skulle gapet mellan nuläget, 2030-målet och visionen kunna överbryggas?

    Rapportens resultat visar att dagens fokus på fossilfrihet och klimatåtgärder måstebreddas till hela hållbarhetsfrågan så att även andra hållbarhetsproblemadresseras och så att inte lösningar på vissa hållbarhetsproblem skapar nya.

    Rapporten tydliggör också att det är nödvändigt, praktiskt möjligt och ekonomisktfördelaktigt för Sydostregionen att göra en snabbare hållbarhetsomställning avpersontransporterna än vad som har föreslagits i tidigare studier och utredningar.Det görs även troligt att detsamma gäller för hela transportsystemet och för helaSverige och världen.

    Även geopolitiska fördelar är troliga. En global övergång till transport- ochenergisystem som baseras på energi från fritt tillgängliga flödesresurser som soloch vind istället för fossila bränslen skulle därför sannolikt minska konfliktriskernai världen. Begränsade tillgångar av litium och platina som batteri- ochbränslecellselbilar är beroende av, och andra metaller som behövs till solceller ochvindkraftverk, kan dock ge motsvarande konfliktproblematik. Denna rapportsrekommendationer om minskat transportbehov och bilberoende och dess fokus påresurseffektivitet motverkar detta genom att slå mot bakomliggande resursdrivandemekanismer. Skulle denna färdplan omsättas i praktisk politik så borde alltså denkommande omställningen som ändå är på gång bli betydligt mer ’framtidssäker’.

  • 110.
    Odiniya, Agenyi Benjamin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Fofuleng, Babila Julius
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Vong, Pheakavoin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Strategic Sustainable Development as an Approach to Conflict Prevention in Conflict-Prone Societies2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Conflict is a complex phenomenon and a major part of sustainability challenges and therefore requires holistic approach for its prevention. This thesis argues that integrating Strategic Sustainable Development (SSD) at the structural level of conflict prevention can provide long term solutions to conflict escalation around the world. SSD provides a holistic approach for addressing the sustainability challenges and complexity of conflict prevention. Sustainability issues (social and ecological) were identified to be at the heart of many conflicts. Both the social (human needs) and ecological (environmental) dimensions are always violated in each conflict. The mechanisms for these violations are embedded in the structures (Political, Economic, Social and environmental) and institutional arrangements that are inherent in conflict-prone societies. Addressing these structural factors has potentials to provide long term solutions to conflict escalation. The connections between conflict and sustainability might not always be easily seen. Using the FSSD as an analytical tool in conjunction with other conflict analysis tools has greater capacity to bring to limelight previously unrecognized risk factors of conflict escalation while at the same time revealing known factors as sustainability challenges. The thesis described the links between conflict,structural conflict prevention, sustainability and Strategic Sustainable Development. Keywords: Conflict, Conflict Prevention, Conflict prone-societies, Structural Prevention, Sustainability, and Strategic Sustainable Development.

  • 111.
    Ohlander, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Willems, Miranda
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Leistra, Paul
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Damstra, Simon
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Biomimicry Toolbox, a strategic tool for generating sustainable solutions?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this thesis is to understand how the Biomimicry Toolbox (BT), a practical tool for applying biomimicry, currently supports strategic thinking in order to create sustainable solutions. A pragmatic qualitative research approach was used, in which the BT was analysed through the lens of the Five Level Framework (5LF), a tool for planning and analysing in complex systems and the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, the application of the 5LF for sustainability endeavours. Interviews were conducted with people experienced with the BT. Results show that the BT has several aspects of strategic thinking. It supports the application of a systems perspective, provides a success goal to move towards and offers tools for a strategic process to follow. The authors conclude that the BT could benefit from including understanding of the patterns and structures of the social system in relation with the earth system. Also, it can benefit from including a section on upstream thinking helping users of the BT consider root causes. Lastly, it could benefit from a strategic approach for evaluating how sustainable solutions are and include a simple and clear prioritisation process. The improvements can make the BT more impactful in supporting societies transition towards sustainability.

  • 112.
    Pedersen, Rebecca Laycock
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lam, David P. M.
    Leuphana Univ, DEU.
    Comment on 'The climate mitigation gap: education and government recommendations miss the most effective individual actions'2018In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 068001Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wynes and Nicholas (2017a Environ. Res. Lett. 12 1-9) recently published an article that reviewed academic and grey literature to identify the most impactful individual actions for reducing carbon emissions in developed countries, identifying having 'one fewer child' as by far the most impactful action. This action was recommended with little context considering its controversial nature. We argue that there are three issue-areas that Wynes and Nicholas should have engaged with to improve the clarity of their recommendations and reduced the potential for misunderstanding, which are (1) the extent to which individual actions in one's private life can address climate change in relation to collective actions and actions in the professional sphere (2) the role of overconsumption in driving climate change and (3) the extent to which family planning is a human right. We also suggest that engagement with these issue-areas are a step towards a better practice in academic writing on population as an environmental issue.

  • 113.
    Ploeg, Pieter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Revald Dorph, Jesper
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Harvey, Nicole
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Planetary Boundaries and Sustainability Principles: An integrated approach in the context of agriculture.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how the Planetary Boundaries (PBs), as derived from the Planetary Boundary Framework (PBF), and the Sustainability Principles (SPs), as derived from the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD), can be integrated. It presents and discusses how the PBs and SPs intersect and provide additive value, with the purpose to inform the development of strategic guidelines towards sustainability. Agriculture was used as a case context due to its significant contribution to the sustainability challenge. The methods include the development of a matrix, populated with agricultural contributions to SP violations and PB transgressions, and a series of qualitative interviews with sustainability experts to validate the matrix and provide further insight into how an integrated approach can be used in practice. Results show that intersects exist on both driver and impact levels, and that the matrix provides an enhanced understanding of the system. Researchers conclude that there are various benefits from integrating the SPs and PBs, including aspects such as easing communication, informing prioritisation of urgent issues, and the development of strategic transformation approaches. Integrating SPs and PBs provides an enhanced definition of sustainability, from which explicit goals, criteria and strategic guidelines can be developed towards solving the sustainability challenge. 

  • 114.
    Rasmussen, Tomas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Analys och optimering av värmesystemet vid centrallasarettet i Karlskrona, för att möjliggöra en ekonomisk och hållbar drift vid låg last2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Commissioned by the Blekinge County Council, I have been tasked to investigate the possibilities for optimizing the hospital in Karlskrona systems for hot water and steam production based on what is economically beneficial and environmentally sustainable in the summer period 15 May to 30 September. Today, the production of hot water and steam is provided by a wood chip boiler during winter, spring and autumn and with the combination of an electrical boiler and district heating during the summer due to the wood chip boiler not being able to be fired toward the low loads that occur during the warmer months. The combined production of both the electric boiler and district heating, has proven to be considerably more expensive than if the production could have been done with the wood chip boiler, due to the high electricity- and district heating prices. Blekinge County Council wishes to examine what measures could be taken for a more sustainable and economical production during the warmer months. The measures that have been investigated in this report is the application of an absorption chiller for increased heating surface, a small additional chip boiler and the cost of district heating at a possible cessation of steamproduction. The report shows that the proposed solutions are possible options for an economically beneficial and environmentally sustainable production during the warmer months. All solutions resulting reportedly in a cheaper and more sustainable production of hot water and steam, and with repayment periods that are lower than the depreciation and economic life. The solution that in short terms proves more profitable, in terms of cost per MWh and paybacktime, is the application of an absorption chiller. The report shows, however, that a greater cooling load than what has been investigated in the report is desired for  optimized sustainability. A small additional chip boiler also results in a lower productioncost than today, albeit with a longer paybacktime due to a higher investment cost. Advantages of an additional chip boiler, which is mentioned in the report, is that this option also results in a more sustainable and cheaper supplement at the tip of the loads during the colder months. Continued production with district heating alone is a third option which is being investigated, and that could be seen as advantageous if the hospital would choose to settle the central steam system. This work shows that the proposed solutions would be approximately 140-279 kronor cheaper per MWh during the solutions economical lifetime and with the current prices an installment periods of 0-24 years.

  • 115.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 1: attempting a generic community planning process model2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric vehicles seem to offer a great potential for sustainable transport development. The Swedish pioneer project GreenCharge Southeast is designed as a cooperative action research approach that aims to explore a roadmap for a fossil-free transport system by 2030 with a focus on electric vehicles. It is the following combination of objectives that puts demand on a new process model adapted for cross-sector and cross-disciplinary cooperation: (i) a fossil-free transport system in Sweden by 2030 and, to avoid sub-optimizations in the transport sector, (ii) assuring that solutions that support (i) also serve other aspects of sustainability in the transport sector and, to avoid that sustainable solutions in the transport sector block sustainable solutions in other sectors, (iii) assuring cohesive creativity across sectors and groups of experts and stakeholders. The new process model was applied in an action-research mode for the exploration of electric vehicles within a fully sustainable transport system to test the functionality of the model in support of its development. To deliver on the above combination of objectives, a framework was needed with principles for sustainability that are universal for any sector as boundary conditions for redesign, and with guidelines for how any organization or sector can create economically feasible step- by-step transition plans. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) is designed to serve such purposes and therefore is embedded into the new process model. The exploration of this new model also helped to identify four interdependent planning perspectives (‘Resource base’, ‘Spatial’, ‘Technical’ and ‘Governance’) that should be represented by the respective experts and stakeholders using the model. In general, the new process model proved helpful by giving diverse stakeholders with various competences and representing various planning perspectives a common, robust, and easy-to- understand goal and a way of working that was adequate for each of their contexts. Furthermore, the evolving process model likely is relevant and useful not only for transport planning and electric vehicles, but for any other societal sector as well and thus for sustainable community planning in general. 

  • 116.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Strateg Sustainable Dev, S-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Prisoners' dilemma misleads business and policy making2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prisoners' dilemma is a game-theoretical construct about trust. It can be seen as a simple version of the 'tragedy of the commons', which is often used in the sustainability context as a metaphor for the tension between responsibility for common resources and the perceived self-benefit to individual organizations, regions or nations who neglect such responsibility in the short term. However, other game theory and developments in sustainability science imply that the prisoners' dilemma mind-set is delusive and misleading for both business and policy making. It helps obscure an even more important aspect of proactive leadership for sustainability: the potential self-benefit of understanding the dynamics of major system change better than one's 'competitors'. The UN 1972,1992; and 2012 summits on sustainability, as well as the many summits on climate change, have been valuable milestones for influencing societal leadership at all levels. However, due to the prisoners' dilemma mind-set, they have also indirectly helped reinforce the idea that sustainability only pays off if the costs of achieving it are shared by all. That, in turn, has encouraged decision makers to believe that 'our organization's, region's or nation's sustainability activity must rely on policy making changing the rules of the game for everybody'. This focus on policy making as the only or main facilitator of sustainability efforts delays the needed transition of global society. By considering game theory such as tit-for-tat and modern systems science for sustainability, this paper illuminates major shortcomings of the prisoners' dilemma in the context of sustainability, and attempts to provide a more fruitful mind-set that can be motivated both theoretically and empirically. It is argued that a large part of the self-benefit of proactivity for sustainability is direct, i.e. independent of other actors' actions for the common good. In addition, it is argued that the self-benefit to businesses can be further increased through voluntary collaboration with other businesses to promote the common good, as well as through collaboration between proactive businesses and policy makers. Currently, none of this is intelligently and operationally part of mainstream leadership and public discourse on sustainability. The clarifications provided in this paper can lead to a much needed shift in mind-set among many leaders, not least political leaders, many of which seem to be trapped in simplistic prisoners' dilemma thinking and who act accordingly. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 117.
    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Cubista, Joshua
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Simonsen, Rowan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Designing Labs for a Sustainable Future2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Through this thesis the authors explore how Labs can be designed in order to catalyze systemic sustainable change by A) contributing to systemic socio-ecological sustainability, B) providing an adaptive and experimental alternative to forecasting and traditional planning, and C) providing forums for collaboration, collective impact, capacity building, and the emergence of systemic solutions to local and global challenges. Through their research the authors performed a literature/field review, reviewed organizational documents, and analyzed a select set of Lab theories, processes, and cases. Additionally the authors interviewed leading experts in Lab design/facilitation, sustainability, the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD), systemic change, and transformative action. The synthesis of this research is offered to emerging Lab designers, practitioners, and facilitators interested in moving society toward a sustainable, regenerative, and thriving future.

  • 118.
    Rosengren, Anna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Maher Elsayed, Mohamed
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Eklund, Niklas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Corporate leadership development programs towards sustainability2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing level of complexity that leaders face today, represented in the accelerating pace of technology advancement and globalization, along with the climate change indicators reaching unprecedented levels, the need for good leadership quality has become more crucial than ever. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development provides a systems perspective, a principle-based definition and a way to strategically move towards sustainability, however still there is a need to specify what is required for leaders to lead organizations through this process.

    The aim of the thesis is to explore how corporate leadership development companies can develop the essential leadership competencies to address the sustainability challenge. The study used the Key Competences in Sustainability Framework as a base to interview six leadership development companies from different areas in the world. The findings revealed that there is an essential need for self-development for leaders to handle complexity, as well as the need from leaders to create the proper conditions for their organizations to utilize the competences from the KCSF. Furthermore the results also showcased the need for standard common definition regarding sustainability.

  • 119.
    Schulte, Jesko
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainability Risk Management in Product Development Companies - Motivating Change2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Both the ecological and social system are systematically degrading, resulting in decreasing capacities to support human civilization. Product development and manufacturing companies play a key role in driving society’s transition towards a sustainable path. Besides moral arguments, the motivation for companies can be expressed as a matter of smart risk management, i.e. avoiding threats and exploiting opportunities. Such sustainability risks can be related to, for example, brand and reputation, legislative change, or attracting top-talented employees. But, more importantly, it is about understanding changes that are inevitable on markets to come. Based on Maxwell’s interactive qualitative research approach and following the structure of the Design Research Methodology, this thesis aims to contribute (i) to knowledge by increasing the conceptual understanding of what sustainability risks are; and (ii) to practice by researching decision-support for how sustainability risks can be managed in a product development company context. The first study reviewed existing literature and identified characteristics of sustainability risks, which make them particularly difficult to manage. A following exploratory and descriptive study investigated companies’ current risk management practices and preconditions for sustainability integration. It showed that the effects of uncertainty from the sustainability transition need to be identified, assessed, and managed in relation to how they can affect objectives anchored in both internal and external stakeholder value creation. In parallel, the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development was applied as a lens to understand the implications of the sustainability transition for company risk management. This resulted in a new definition, stating that sustainability risks are threats and opportunities that are due to an organization’s contribution or counteraction to society’s transition towards strategic sustainable development. A questionnaire study then investigated some case companies’ challenges and preconditions to build sustainability capabilities. Finally, a workshop method is proposed that aims to support design teams in early sustainable product development. Future research will leverage on the findings to develop and test decision support for how product development companies can manage sustainability risks on different organizational levels in practice to increase competitiveness, while taking leadership in the transition towards a sustainable society.

  • 120.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Challenges and preconditions to build capabilities for sustainable product design2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED / [ed] Maier A.M.,Skec S.,Salustri F.A.,Fadel G.,Kim H.,Kokkolaras M.,Oehmen J.,Van der Loos M., Design Society , 2017, Vol. 1, no DS87-1, p. 1-10, article id DS87-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable product innovation has previously been found to be positively correlated to competitiveness. However, in order to build capabilities for sustainability integration one must first understand companies' current state. The overall aim is therefore to identify common preconditions and challenges for sustainability integration in product innovation. A questionnaire study, targeting employees with roles in product development, was conducted at four medium-sized to large product development and manufacturing companies in Sweden. Results show that capabilities for sustainability integration are perceived as decisive for future company success, but are not considered to be correspondingly high prioritized today. Decision making is focused on material selection and energy efficiency, so no full socio-ecological sustainability perspective is covered. Formal decision support tools are only used by half of respondents and are a main area for improvement. Identified challenges include short-term economic thinking, lack of sustainability criteria and vague management commitment. Based on these findings, seven recommendations for companies are presented and validated.

  • 121.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Challenges for integrating sustainability in risk management-current state of research2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, The Design Society, 2017, no DS87-2, p. 327-336, article id DS87-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous examples have shown how environmental and social issues can affect companies to an existential level. In fact, today's most urgent business risks, e.g. brand value, legislative change, litigation, and supply chain disruptions, are directly linked to sustainability issues. These risks need to be systematically identified and strategically managed on both strategic company-and operational product development level in order for a company to be long-term competitive. Based on literature review and interviews at case companies, this paper investigates the current state for integrating a strategic sustainability perspective in risk management processes and related support tools. Results show that sustainability risks are not consciously identified and managed at the companies. Research is at an early stage and few frameworks and tools exist. Based on the findings, the study identifies and provides a comprehensive analysis of challenges for sustainability integration, which work as a foundation for future research. Finally, key steps to advance understanding and methods in sustainability risk management are suggested.

  • 122.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Company Risk Management in Light of the Sustainability Transition2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, article id 4137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the most important business and economic risks are directly linked to environmental and social issues. This includes both threats and opportunities, not only in relation to reputation, which is often mentioned in this context, but, even more importantly, in relation to innovation capability and legislative change on inevitably more and more sustainability-driven markets. It is, however, unclear through which mechanisms such sustainability risks currently affect companies and how they can be systematically identified and managed. Based on the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, this study investigates the dynamics and implications of society’s sustainability transition from a company risk management perspective. In addition, exploratory and descriptive studies were conducted at two large product innovation companies to identify current risk management practices and preconditions for sustainability integration. The results reveal that a society moving closer towards a collapse of environmental and social systems leads to increasing sustainability-related threats for unsustainable businesses and increasing opportunities for sustainable businesses. Also, risk management is found to be a promising way for maneuvering in a smart zone between being too passive and being too pro-active in relation to sustainable innovation.The study participants at the case companies were knowledgeable about risk management in general but were largely unfamiliar with risks associated with sustainability and no processes or support tools exist to work systematically with such risks. Key steps to accomplishing an integration of a strategic sustainability perspective into risk management are proposed as: (i) identifying the effects of sustainability issues on internal and external stakeholder value; (ii) actively including sustainability in objective setting and cascading objectives across the levels of the organizational hierarchy; and (iii) developing concrete support for identifying, assessing, and managing economic sustainability risks. Thereby, companies can enhance their competitiveness while providing leadership in the sustainability transition.

  • 123.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Risk Management Practices in Product Development Companies2018In: Proceedings of Norddesign 2018, The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development (PD) is inherently linked to taking and managing risks. For risk management (RM) to be truly effective, it cannot be treated in product development in isolation. Instead, a holistic perspective is required that recognizes and leverages the communication and connections between RM sub-disciplines across the organizational hierarchy, including e.g. enterprise-, portfolio-, project-, and product RM. Therefore, the purpose of this study is (i) to investigate current RM practices on the strategic, tactical, and operational levels, and (ii) to increase the understanding of how RM sub-disciplines are connected and interact. To answer these questions, semi-structured interviews were conducted at two large multinational PD and manufacturing companies in Sweden. Also, based on previous research, a novel self-assessment tool was developed and tested to map areas of strength and identify improvement potential. The results show that RM processes are mostly formalized and systematic, but there is variation in the quality of performed RM activities. Qualitative support tools are dominating. The tools themselves are considered to be helpful, however, the challenge is to make people use them in value-adding ways. Other challenges and success factors include competence and awareness, culture, top-down demand for high quality RM activities and deliverables, a dedicated role with clear responsibility, and working early and continuously with RM. The importance of experience is stressed, however, no systematic way to work with lessons learned and knowledge sharing is in place at the companies. Risks are found to be primarily escalated bottom-up. The corresponding top-down flow constitutes of objectives, which ideally are cascaded all the way from company vision and strategy into product requirements. Through these findings, the contribution of this study is (i) providing detailed insight into current RM practices, not limited to the PD function, but considering a broader organizational context; and (ii) clarifying the role of goals and objectives for connecting RM on different levels.

  • 124.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Self-Assessment Method for Sustainability Implementation in Product Innovation2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies, striving towards an effective and systematic integration of a strategic sustainability perspective in product innovation, need to treat the implementation of necessary processes and tools, as well as their continuous improvement, as a project in itself. An efficient way to measure the current sustainability implementation level in the organization, as well as guidance for progression, is required. To meet this need, a novel self-assessment was developed, which provides companies with a tool to assess and visualize their current capabilities in relation to key elements for successful sustainability integration in the product innovation process. It includes a scale of different sustainability implementation levels to support building a roadmap for systematic implementation, and to measure progress over time. This research is based on results from previous descriptive work within the area of sustainable product development and learning from applying strategic and tactical assessment tools for eco-design and sustainability maturity. Besides the contribution to practice, this study also contributes to knowledge by specifying detailed aspects for each key element that must be considered to guide sustainability integration. Also, insights from applying different existing tools in real cases are provided. The newly-developed self-assessment method was applied and validated at two case companies. Independent and continuous use of it by the companies beyond this particular study indicate the practical value of the method.

  • 125.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainability Risk Management for Product Innovation2018In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN, The Design Society, 2018, Vol. 1, p. 655-666Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social and environmental issues are directly connected to many of the most important risks that productdevelopment companies are facing. Based on literature review and interviews, this study investigatesrisk management practices on the strategic, tactical, and operational levels of companies. The findingsare used to identify preconditions for integrating sustainability into risk management processes andsupport tools. The results show that sustainability risks need to be connected to company objectivesthrough internal and external stakeholder value creation.

  • 126.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Workshop Method for Early Sustainable Product Development2018In: DS 92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference, The Design Society, 2018, p. 2751-2762Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is in the early phases of product development that most of a product’s life-cycle sustainability impact is determined. This study presents a workshop method that has the purpose to support multi-disciplinary teams in sustainable product development, focusing on early phases. The workshop method aims to map the sustainability challenges and opportunities of a concept at an overarching level, utilizing backcasting from sustainability principles in three steps: create vision, assess current state, derive strategies. Testing and validation was done at two companies and with one academic group.

  • 127.
    Schulte, Jesko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Electric road systems: Strategic stepping stone on the way towards sustainable freight transport?2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrification of the transport sector has been pointed out as a key factor for tackling some of today's main challenges, such as global warming, air pollution, and eco-system degradation. While numerous studies have investigated the potential of electrifying passenger transport, less focus has been on how road freight transport could be powered in a sustainable future. This study looks at Electric Road Systems (ERS) in comparison to the current diesel system. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development was used to assess whether ERS could be a stepping stone on the way towards sustainability. Strategic life-cycle assessment was applied, scanning each life-cycle phase for violations against basic sustainability principles. Resulting sustainability "hot spots" were quantified with traditional life-cycle assessment. The results show that, if powered by renewable energy, ERS have a potential to decrease the environmental impact of freight transport considerably. Environmental payback times of less than five years are achievable if freight traffic volumes are sufficiently high. However, some severe violations against sustainability principles were identified. Still, ERS could prove to be a valuable part of the solution, as they drastically decrease the need for large batteries with high cost and sustainability impact, thereby catalyzing electrification and the transition towards sustainable freight transport. © 2018 by the authors.

  • 128.
    Shapira, Hila
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ketchie, Adela
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nehe, Meret
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The integration of Design Thinking and Strategic Sustainable Development2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 277-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities are now so pervasive and profound that they are altering the stability of the earth in ways that threaten the very life support system upon which humanity depends. The field of design has contributed to the creation of such complex socio-ecological problems, but it is also adapting as a source for solutions. Design Thinking (DT) was identified as a possible approach that could help create such solutions, and contribute to Strategic Sustainable Development (SSD). The purpose of the research was to examine potential contributors and hindrances of the DT process with regards to SSD, and create a prototype of an integrated process that could help achieve more strategic and sustainable outcomes. Using the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) as a lens to examine and inform the above, combined with interviews, Action Research and expert feedback, an integrated process was created. It was indicated by participants of the Action Research and by experts that the proposed prototype could help reach strategic and sustainable outcomes, and that further refinement should be pursued. Consequently, a third and final prototype, suggesting a possible Sustainable Design Thinking (SDT) process, was developed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 129.
    Sienknecht, Jos
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Villafranca, Daniel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Martel, Jennifer
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lamb, Sarah
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Promoting Sustainability through the Integration of Citizen Science and Ecotourism2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to draw attention to a new concept within the tourism industry that integrates citizen science into an ecotourism product. The merge of citizen science and ecotourism shows potential to play a role in strategic sustainable development and to give ecotourism providers a competitive advantage in the market. However, the environmental and social benefits of this concept can only be realized if it is applied correctly. The framework for strategic for strategic sustainable development (FSSD) was used to address the complexity surrounding ecotourism and the use of citizen science. The study used a mixed method research design by conducting exploratory interviews, and then distributing a questionnaire to validate the qualitative findings. Results demonstrate that the merge of citizen science and ecotourism could contribute to sustainability through education, conservation, local community engagement, and the increased environmental awareness of the travellers. Additionally, it demonstrates that the integration of citizen science in an ecotourism product might create business benefits for the ecotourism providers in conjunction with a dynamic learning experience for the consumer. This study makes adaptions to a widely used citizen science toolkit and recommends appropriate changes to the process in order to ensure that it is effective for ecotourism providers while incorporating sustainability throughout the product design phase.

  • 130.
    Silvander, Johan
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Software Engineering.
    Wälitalo, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Knowledge creation through a teaching and learning spiral2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: We have experienced the use of a domain specific language sometimes makes it difficult to present domain knowledge to a group or an individual that has limited or different knowledge about the specific domain, and where the presenter and the audience do not have sufficient insight into each other's contexts. In order to create an environment w here knowledge transfer can exists it is vital to understand how the roles are shifting during the interaction between the participants. In an educational environment Teaching and Learning Activities (TLA) could, in ideal situations, be invented during the design of the curriculum. This might not be the case when interacting with practitioners or students from diverse fields. This situation requires a method to find TLAs for the specific situation. For the domain knowledge to be useful for learners it has to be connected to the context/domain where the learners are active. In this paper we combine a spiral learning process with constructive alignment, which resulted in a teaching and learning spiral process. The outcome of the teach - ing and learning spiral process is to provide the knowledge of using the introduced domain knowledge in a context/domain where the learners are active.

    Objective: The aim with this work is to present guidelines that will contribute to a more effective knowledge creation process in heterogeneous groups, both in an educational environment and in interaction with different groups of practitioners in society.

    Method: We conducted a case study using observations and surveys.

    Results: The results from our case study support a positive effect on the learning outcomes when adopting this methodology. The learning outcome is to gain deeper understanding of the introduced domain knowledge and being able to dis - cuss how the new domain knowledge can be integrated to the learners own context.

    Conclusions: We have formulated guidelines for how to use the teaching and learning spiral process in an effective and efficient way.

  • 131.
    Soares Braga, Cecilia
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Kuuluvainen, Salla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Barroso Bastos, Yasmin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Leveraging Learning Experiences in Sustainability-oriented Challenge Prizes2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 132.
    Stenger, Rebecca
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Thomaes, Tom
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Westphal, Marius
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    CRAFTS: A Compass to Refine and Align Factory Performance towards Sustainability2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry must align business values with sustainability to preserve a healthy socio-ecological environment, that ensures access for future generations to necessary resources. To better understand the interactions between business strategies and facility operations, this research aims to adopt a more holistic perspective of sustainable facility planning processes, applying the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. By using relevant environmental and social principles, methods, knowledge, and industrial practices, a strategic decision support was developed as a foundation for the manufacturing industry to improve their sustainable performance. This research (1) collected and analysed existing concepts and processes for sustainability in the industry; (2) developed a practical decision support tool; (3) reviewed the design by experts in the field; and (4) redesigned the tool by implementing expert recommendations. Based on the findings, it is crucial for decision makers to embed a strategic and holistic approach when considering facility design options. Therefore, the strategic decision support tool (CRAFTS) enables opportunities for a broader scope of possible improvements within the confines of the manufacturing facility by guiding experts in the field to decide between retrofitting and new construction. CRAFTS supports the industry to refine and align their business strategies and facility operations with sustainability.

  • 133.
    Stöver, Emiel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lechevalier, Sarah
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    van Welie, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Paar, Maximilian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Possible Contribution of Local Currencies to Strategic Sustainable Development2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Local communities encounter various problems related to the global economic system. Socio-economic challenges arise in these communities due to the disappearance of jobs and the leakage of money, this results in a diminishing of social resilience which in turn means that these communities are hampered in their move towards strategic sustainable development. According to scientific literature, a local currency could be an instrument to overcome this diminishing of social resilience. However, the role of these currencies in strategic sustainable development remains unclear. This study aims to bridge this gap in scientific knowledge.

    In order to do so, three different case studies of local currencies were conducted by means of semi-structured interviews. This data was compared with the theory on local currencies and assessed through the lens of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. Using this specific framework allows for a unique systems perspective on sustainable development.

    It becomes clear that local currencies raise awareness around sustainability challenges and incentivise social interactions; however this remains a marginal contribution towards strategic sustainable development. This research leads to the recommendation to explore enhancements to local currencies in order to address these sustainability challenges more adequately.

  • 134.
    Svensson, Martin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Gould, Rachael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hurdles to Clear: Cognitive Barriers in Sustainable Product Development2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development is a phased decision making process that is difficult to manage, for example, due to lack of knowledge in the early phases when design freedom is high. The management becomes even more challenging when adding the new, complex and potentially long range considerations of sustainability to decision making in product development.

    More explicitly, the management challenge is manifested in that product developers initially know little about the design problem, which is when they have highest design freedom. Later, when the product developers have acquired more knowledge about the design problem, design freedom has diminished. In sum, this paradox illustrates two challenging situations in which product developers undertake decision-making – low knowledge and high freedom, and higher knowledge and lower freedom. With the addition of time pressure, these challenging decision making situations lead product developers to become susceptible to relying on heuristics, and prone to systematic errors and biases.

    In our study, we aim to outline and understand which cognitive shortcomings are involved and create potential problems in development of more sustainable products. We do so by asking the question ‘Which cognitive barriers are most relevant when incorporating sustainability considerations into product development?’ Out of four identified categories of product development decisions - concept development, supply chain design, product design, and production ramp-up and launch – we focus on the first three as they are categories of decisions where product developers may try to incorporate sustainability. To address this question, we used the rich psychology literature on cognitive shortcomings to identify which barriers are particularly relevant in the decision-making context described by the literature on product development and decision-making for sustainability.

    We contribute to the practice of people developing decision support for sustainable product development by increasing awareness of cognitive barriers that are particularly relevant in this context. Theoretically, we contribute with increased understanding regarding how different cognitive barriers may be influential under certain phases, and not under others – a matter which underpins a forthcoming discussion on how clusters of cognitive shortcomings may affect outcomes of including sustainability in the product development process.

  • 135.
    Svensson, Matilda
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Solceller: Lönsamt och långsiktigt hållbart energiförsörjningsalternativ för Landstinget Blekinge?2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The County Council of Blekinge is one of the county’s largest property owner and has today a great need of external distribution och electricity due to the organization’s energy intensive operations. According to the County Council’s environmental plan there is a desire to investigate the possibilities of producing electricity with solar cells. Therefore this feasibility study has the purpose of analyzing its profitability anf long-term sustainability following a possible future investment.The report proceeds to describe potential and economic prerequisites for solar cells in Sweden, future energy systems, as well as changing conditions for the daily operations regarding maintenance and safety with a solar cell plant. Thereafter, with the use of a theoretical projection of a solarplant that resulted in two different, the study determines possible profitability, cost of produced electricity and an estimated yearly production relative to the County Council’s need of external electricity.

    To perform an adequate projection and receive knowledge about maintenance and safety interviews with special advisers and organizations which have invested in solar cell plants interviews was performed. The result is presented as two solar plants that differs in size and mounting. Alternative A) has an installed power of 101 kW with a cost of investment of 1 100 00 – 1 260 000 SEK, and alternative B) har an installed power of 145 kW to the cost of 1 500 000 – 1 740 000 SEK. Despite the differences was the disparity in pay-back-time and cost of produced electricity fractional, with our without subsidies.

    The profitability is the most benefitial with an issued subsidy for solar cells and implicates a shorter pay-back-period of 9,8 – 11,3 years for alternative A) and 10 – 11,5 years for alternative B). Relative to the economic lifespan of a solar plant of 25 – 30 years it is a profitable investment.With a higher estimated yearly production and easier mounting considering wind load a conclusion was drawn that alternative B) with an installed power 145 kW would benefit the County Council the most from an economic and sustainable perspective. Because after the pay-back-period has ended it would generate more savings of money and a greater lowering of carbon dioxide emissions as a result of the higher annual production of electricity.

    Several sources show that solar cells are a aprt of a future energy system and is long-term sustainable due to benefits considering lowered carbon dioxide emissions. At an investment the County Council of Blekinge could strengthen and develop a green brand with a renewable energy supply with a solar cell plant which would contribute to sustainable development according to the organization’s environmental plan, as well as national and European climate and environmental goals.

  • 136.
    Tange, Lotte
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Löwgren, Annika
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Post, Ted Jan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Internal Corporate Communication: Aligning Employees for Strategic Sustainable Development2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Making a societal transition towards sustainability is a global concern of ever increasing urgency. Succeeding in this mission requires all societal sectors to be on board and contribute. This thesis focuses on the transformation of the corporate sector, namely how Internal Corporate Communication (ICC), i.e. communication between senior management and employees, can be designed to engage employees in working with sustainability. This thesis uses a conceptual model developed for ICC and employee engagement and applies it in the specific context of ICC with regards to sustainability in medium- to large-sized companies in Northern Europe. Through interviewing practitioners working with ICC on sustainability in ‘model’ sustainability companies, the research aims to discern best practices on how to design ICC about sustainability to engage employees. The results show that ICC can be a useful tool when it comes to engaging employees in working with sustainability, and the findings are summarized as guidelines for content creation and methods to use to facilitate engagement creation for sustainability. The discussion elaborates on how these guidelines can be used together with the Strategic Sustainable Development approach to facilitate companies’ journeys towards sustainability.

  • 137.
    Timóteo, Lúcia
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Matuszak, Natalia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Indilaitė, Vaiva
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Guidelines for Wellness towards Social Sustainability: Moving Sweden to Optimal Health2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a conclusion of a four-month-long research project. Aging and lifestyle diseases pose a massive challenge for sustainability of societies of the developed countries. The aim of the study was creation of a set of guidelines and actions that would facilitate interaction between primary health care and wellness organisations in Sweden in a manner conducive to achievement of social sustainability in the area of public health. The theoretical part provides insights into significance of public health for sustainability. It explores systematic barriers for achievement and maintenance of optimal health within health system and social system. Research was conducted through interviews with professionals working at the Blekinge Health Arena, doctors and nurses. The results were framed within FSSD to ensure compliance with Social Sustainability Principles. The guidelines and actions promote health through lifestyle change, community empowerment, holistic perspective of the patient and close collaboration between primary health care and wellness organisations. The authors believe the results may be widely implemented within Sweden, helping transition towards sustainability.

  • 138.
    Unéus, Viktor
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Kan Anderssons hus bli ett passivhus?2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report considers the possibilities to build a passive house or mini-energy house within reasonable demands on manufacturers and construction firms for one of 3D House’s customers. The client has already been in contact with different manufacturers and construction firms with different demands, but with the same warranty of energy efficient materials. In this study there’s a comparison of these demands and warrants show that, even with the same stated terms of low efficient material, the transmission loss vary considerably. Especially the warrants for airtight constructions vary much.Because of the buildings shape it becomes clear that it would need very high requirement on the products and the work to meet the requirements for passive house. The shape of the house does on the other hand make sure that it's a big difference between the different products which would make it a good idea to look over the different chose.The areas there this report is in first hand how the different companies for walls because of that is an area there it's a big different between different choice and it's a big part of the climate shield. It will also have a look over what kind of windows and doors that exist that meet both the requirements for passive house and the costumer.

  • 139.
    Van der Molen, Thomas
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Bagrianski, Anastasia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Strategic Sustainable Trigger Questions: How Strategic Sustainable Development might be introduced in the Lean Startup through the Business Model Canvas2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We are living in the “Anthropocene” the era in which human activities are responsible for severe damage to the resilience of the ecological and social systems, undermining the Earth’s autopoetic mechanism, integrity and ability to function as a healthy complex adaptive systems. The prevailing societal paradigm for business practices has yet to realise the reality of our current global unsustainable state – and the shift necessary to move us forward collectively. Startup companies have a unique opportunity to gain and leverage competitiveness and attractiveness for funding and customers through sustainability driven business strategies, models and value propositions.

    This research analyses literature, document and interview data to explore if and how current practices in the Lean Startup contribute to a sustainable society – and how a Strategic Sustainable Development approach might be introduced to enhance the resilience of Lean Startups.

    Therefore, our key recommendations for Lean Startups that want to introduce an SSD approach are: to raise awareness about the sustainability challenges and opportunities; utilise backcasting towards a vision framed by the Sustainability Principles; focus on fulfilling fundamental basic Human Needs; utilize strategic prioritization questions when pivoting and combine the FSSD ABCD process with the Lean BML cycle. Ultimately, this thesis proposes the use of Strategic Sustainable Trigger Questions to (re)design sustainable business models and value-propositions.

    We conclude that “asking the right questions - rather than giving answers up front” might spark conversations and innovations in Lean Startups, beneficial for the sustainability of both the individual startup the larger socio-ecological systems.

  • 140.
    Villamil, Carolina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainability Product Portfolio: A Review2018In: European Journal of Sustainable Development, ISSN 2239-5938, E-ISSN 2239-6101, Vol. 7, p. 146-158, article id 4Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies have identified the importance of sustainable innovation for long-term competitiveness and recognition but face difficulties in translating sustainability strategies into practical action. Some companies have shown an interest to include sustainability dimensions into their product portfolio, which can be an efficient way to communicate the sustainability performance of the products internally and externally and even speed up the development of more sustainable solutions. Our research aims to determine how a sustainability portfolio can be defined and how to assess portfolios from a sustainability perspective. A systematic literature review on sustainability product portfolio was conducted. The results indicated that a general portfolio setting follows a selection criteria and the company´s strategies, which usually are based on management elements, e.g., time, cost, risk, quality, etc., leaving behind sustainability variables. Most of the tools used for evaluation criteria miss the holistic view. The companies could benefit from a systematic approach to implementing sustainability into their product portfolio. The findings were connected with a previous study to evaluate a sustainability assessment approach used for a technology portfolio. For future work, a descriptive study will complement an understanding on how to guide companies to shape their sustainability product portfolios.

  • 141.
    Villamil, Carolina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nylander, Johanna
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Schulte, Jesko
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Watz, Matilda
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Additive manufacturing from a strategic sustainability perspective2018In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N., Dubrovnik, Croatia: The Design Society, 2018, Vol. 3, p. 1381-1392Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are high expectations of additive manufacturing (AM) as a technology to improve manufacturing efficiency and reduce material waste. This study aims to clarify the sustainability advantages and challenges of AM technologies used in industry by testing and applying a strategic sustainability life cycle assessment in the early development stage. The result showed possibilities from using the tool and some areas of certain interest regarding improvement potentials of the AM technologies, i.e. value chain management, concept design, optimized material usage, and social sustainability

  • 142.
    Viscardi, Luigi
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hofmann, Johanna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    van Hoek, Marijs
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Opportunities to enhance cooperatives’ long-term success through strategic planning2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to enhance the inherent potential of cooperatives to support society’s move towards global socio-ecological sustainability, they need to plan strategically. Strategic planning with this goal in mind requires organisations to describe and identify steps towards a desired future. The research team set out to provide practical and context-appropriate guidance to cooperatives, describing opportunities to use strategic planning in the starting-up phase in support of their long-term success. The team deployed a qualitative and iterative approach based on grounded theory and conducted a total of twenty-four interviews with cooperative practitioners and experts as well as strategic planning experts.  The outcome of the interviews are thematic areas recommended to cover in the starting-up phase of a cooperative. The thematic areas are presented in an ABCD Strategic Planning process which aims to build a shared mental model among all stakeholders, using a participatory approach. The process may be useful for newcomers to the cooperative world; future research in support of cooperatives may want to implement the above mentioned strategic planning process while capturing lessons for its improvement.  

  • 143.
    Viszlay, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Frau.
    Mumme, Jannika
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hagedorn, Hanne
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Planning for sustainability in Swedish municipalities: a strategic approach2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Municipalities play an important role in society’s transition towards sustainability. However, as they are subject to forces from both top-down (legislation etc.) and bottom-up (stakeholders’ needs and interests etc.), as well as internal dynamics within the municipal organisation, their planning approaches are usually not strategic. This implies that there is often a gap between long-term plans and short-term actions. This thesis explores enablers and barriers for strategic sustainability planning in municipalities. Focussing in particular on the översiktsplan Swedish municipalities are required to create for their spatial planning, we develop a proposal how the planning process defined by Swedish law can be made more strategic and incorporate sustainability. We suggest to integrate elements of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) into the planning process, and to engage experts and the general public from early on. Moreover, we provide a toolkit containing various instruments that facilitate using the strategic planning process proposed. Finally, this thesis shows ways to deal with forces from top-down, bottom-up and within the municipality. The suggestions build on insights from literature as well as interviews conducted in municipalities and with further experts, but have not yet been tested in a real-life context.

  • 144.
    Wassmer von Langenstein, Yannick
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Conrad, Jessica
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sossouhounto, Prescilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Exploring the Cultural Dimension of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although there has been a growing interest in policy and among scholars to consider culture as an aspect of sustainable development, the understanding of culture within the framework of sustainable development has remained vague. This study sought to discover what influence culture may have on the practical application of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD). The research focused on the approaches FSSD practitioners take in their application of the framework within different cultural contexts in an attempt both to uncover patterns and to develop guidelines for applying the framework in those contexts with cultural sensitivity. A qualitative research approach was selected, and a literature review and semi-structured interviews were used to elicit the approaches of thirteen FSSD practitioners with experience applying the framework outside of Europe and North America. The results revealed four main cultural factors FSSD practitioners account for when applying the framework in different cultural contexts and four practical strategies used to account for those cultural factors. Based on these discoveries, strategic guidelines were created to complement the FSSD so that it can be more easily applied in different cultural contexts, thereby contributing to the framework’s ultimate goal of accelerating the global transition toward a sustainable society.

  • 145.
    Watz, Matilda
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Addressing Sustainability in Product Requirements: a Systems Perspective2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Design in the Era of Digitalization, NordDesign 2018, The Design Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of sustainability considerations in product development can lead to unintended consequences that are costly in the long run, and difficult to solve. Furthermore, the sustainability performance of a solution is predominately determined by decisions in the early phases of the design process, in which requirements are formed and which plays an essential role to guide and constrain innovation. The purpose of this paper is therefore to explore possibilities to address previously identified research gaps regarding i) the importance and challenges to integrate sustainability aspects into design requirements, and ii) the need of a strategic approach based on a full socio-ecological sustainability perspective to select which sustainability criteria to integrate. The aim is to investigate how the influence of sustainability aspects on traditional design variables may be modelled using systems thinking, e.g., System Dynamics modelling, as previous research has pointed out this as an area for future research. Against this background this paper explores the potential of a systems thinking perspective within requirements development, and how it can be applied, to favour a strategic sustainability perspective in product development. A conceptual literature review covering systems engineering, requirements engineering and systems dynamics, was conducted to analyse which phase in the requirements development that could benefit from systems thinking to promote a strategic integration of sustainability criteria into the requirement list. The results point towards the domain between stakeholder requirements and functional requirements, to allow building of a shared understanding the full design decision context that can be cascaded through the requirement levels. Furthermore, a systems analysis model can clarify which requirements that are involved in trade-offs and how. In addition, more detailed requirements imply less space for innovation. One outcome of the paper is a simplified causal loop diagram, showing how a systems’ modelling approach can help identify both traditional trade-offs between strategically identified leading sustainability criteria and traditional design requirements. Potential incentives for sustainable design decisions were identified. Future research will focus on improving and testing the suggested approach and investigate how sustainability criteria indicators can be linked to design value drivers.

  • 146.
    Watz, Matilda
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Integrating Sustainability in Product Requirements2018In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN, The Design Society, 2018, Vol. 3, p. 1405-1416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trade-offs between sustainability criteria and engineering design variables can lead to sub-optimisations and costly short-term priorities. This study explores how sustainability requirements can be identified and integrated in product requirements to guide strategic and tactical decisions in product development including sustainability perspectives. Literature review and action research resulted in a proposed systematic approach that: define sustainability criteria and indicators; use correlation analysis with QFD; and adds identified specific sustainability requirements to requirement list.

  • 147.
    Xu, Qianxin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Al-Daghestani, Anas
    AlKassem, Mahinour
    Sustainability-Driven Energy Management Systems for Multinational Organizations: A Case Study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A vital part of sustainable development and solving the sustainability challenge is to reduce the environmental and social impact of multinational organizations caused by their potentially unsustainable energy consumption.

    The focus of this study is to create an energy management system for organizations to strategically transform their energy resources and energy consumption to reduce their socioecological impact. It is important to ask what are the critical elements that would hinder or allow for the shift to renewable energy and energy efficiency?  It is also important to question how can those elements be integrated together to address the sustainability challenge with the energy consumption of multinational manufacturers?

    A case study on an organization was done to identify some of the barriers and drivers, for them to implement sustainable energy management systems, and to modify the sustainable energy management system that propose strategies around synergy between energy efficiency and renewable energy, to make it a decision-making tool focused on energy planning.

    The construction of the tool, with the help of the case study organization and its decision makers, allowed the design of a more overarching tool that includes sustainability concepts and ensures the sustainability approach in its scheme and implementation

  • 148.
    Zetterlund, Helena
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Implementation Potential of Sustainability-oriented Decision Support in Product Development2016In: 26TH CIRP DESIGN CONFERENCE / [ed] Wang, L; Kjellberg, T, Elsevier, 2016, p. 287-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify challenges and opportunities for implementation of sustainability-oriented decision support in product development. A literature review and interviews with field experts were performed. Most methods/tools designed to support sustainability considerations in product development have a low level of implementation. A lack of the full scope of sustainability and poor practical applicability might be reasons. Implementation could be improved by amending these deficiencies. Another opportunity is to integrate sustainability aspects in methods/tools that are often already implemented in companies. A low-hanging fruit can be to focus on the area of risk management together with defining sustainability criteria.

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