Change search
Refine search result
78910 451 - 454 of 454
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 451. Wohlin, Claes
    et al.
    Petersson, Håkan
    Aurum, Aybüke
    Shull, Forrest
    Ciolkowski, Marcus
    Software Inspection Benchmarking: A Qualitative and Quantitative Comparative Opportunity.2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software inspections are commonly used throughout the software industry, but there are still open questions about the relationship between inspection processes and inspection effectiveness. For example, which techniques work best in various environments? Are requirements specifications inspections and code inspections different in terms of effectiveness? What is the effectiveness in inspections for different group sizes? Benchmarking provides an opportunity to address such issues. This paper discusses how benchmarking may be applied for software inspections. The discussion is illustrated with an empirical study. It is shown how the data can be used to plan and manage software inspections. It is concluded that software inspections are well suited for benchmarking and that software practitioners as well as researchers can learn valuable lessons.

  • 452. Wohlin, Claes
    et al.
    Petersson, Håkan
    Höst, Martin
    Runeson, Per
    Defect content estimation for two reviewers2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of the defect content is important to enable quality control throughout the software development process. Capture-recapture methods and curve fitting methods have been suggested as tools to estimate the defect content after a review. The methods are highly reliant on the quality of the data. If the number of reviewers is fairly small, it becomes difficult or even impossible to get reliable estimates. This paper presents a comprehensive study of estimates based on two reviewers, using real data from reviews. Three experience-based defect content estimation methods are evaluated vs. methods that use data only from the current review. Some models are possible to distinguish from each other in terms of statistical significance. In order to gain an even better understanding, the best models are compared subjectively. It is concluded that the experience-based methods provide some good opportunities to estimate the defect content after a review.

  • 453. Xie, M
    et al.
    Hong, G Y
    Wohlin, Claes
    Modeling and Analysis of Software System Reliability.2003In: Case Studies on Reliability and Maintenance / [ed] Blischke, W; Murphy, P, Germany: Wiley VHC Verlag , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 454. Zhang, Peng
    et al.
    Bai, Guohua
    A Cybernetic Architecture of Practical Reasoning Agent2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last ten years, agent technology has been widely discussed in various research areas. An agent is a computer system that is situated in some environment, and that is capable of autonomous actions in this environment in order to meet its design objectives. There are at least two kinds of reasoning methods applied in constructing an agent, namely practical reasoning and theoretical reasoning. Practical reasoning directed towards actions – the process of figuring out what to do by weighing different acting options against with agent desires and believes. While theoretical reasoning is directed towards beliefs. In this paper, we just focus on practical reasoning. A widely used BDI model for practical reasoning agent will be introduced, based on which our cybernetic-BDI architecture is discussed. ‘Intelligence’ and ‘autonomy’ are perhaps the most important aspects of agent system. Attempts to model intelligent behaviors of an agent, especially a practical reasoning agent, have been made from areas of computer sciences, psychology, sociology, and many others. Cybernetics provides a concrete mechanism for this purpose, namely by ‘feedback’, ‘feedforward’, and ‘sociocybernetics’. We discuss first intelligent behaviors of agent systems in terms of reactivity, proactity, and social ability based on cybernetic concepts of feedback, feedforward, and sociocybernetics. Then based on the Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI) model and cybernetic principles we build up our Cybernetic-BDI architecture. With a pseudocode we validate the architecture for its practical implementation and fulfillment of required intelligent behaviors. In the last, a scenario of healthcare agent for diabetes patients is provided to show how the agent works according to the Cybernetic-BDI architecture.

78910 451 - 454 of 454
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf