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  • 51.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Noorman, Merel
    Wessels, Bridgette A.
    Sveinsdottir, Thordis
    How can libraries and other academic stakeholders engage in making data open?2014In: Information Services and Use, ISSN 0167-5265, E-ISSN 1875-8789, Vol. 34, no 3/4, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will address the questions of what and where the value of open access to research data might be and how libraries and related stakeholders can contribute to achieve the benefits of freely sharing data. In particular, the emphasis is on how libraries need to acquire the competence for collaboration to train and encourage researchers and library staff to work with open data. The paper is based on the early results of the RECODE project, an EU FP7 project that addresses the drivers and barriers in developing open access to research data in Europe (http://www.recodeproject.eu).

  • 52.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Norling, Eva
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Pettersson, Anette
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Petersson, Lena
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Pettersson, Kent
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Stockmann, Anna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Swartz, Sofia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Researchers and Open Data: Attitudes and Culture at Blekinge Institute of Technology2015In: New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Electronic Publishing, / [ed] Birgit Schmidt and Milena Dobreva, IOS Press, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During March 2015, the Blekinge Institute of Technology library carried out an interview survey comprising around 36 senior researchers and postdocs mainly in engineering sciences, with the objective to get a picture of how research data is managed at BTH and to find out what the researcher attitudes are to sharing data. The survey showed that most researchers in the study were positive to sharing research data but lacked any experience of making data management plans and had little or no knowledge of data preservation or of sharing open data. Uncertainties about data ownership are also an issue.

  • 53. Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Stjernberg, Helena
    Svensson, Aina
    Open Access at Swedish Universities and University Colleges: From Headwind to Tailwind?2009In: ScieCom Info, E-ISSN 1652-3202, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From the autumn of 2008 up to the autumn of 2009 five seminars have been carried out at Swedish universities and university colleges with the purpose of increasing researchers’ knowledge of Open Access. The seminars have been arranged within the project ”Researcher meetings on Open Access” which is funded by the program OpenAcess.se of the National Library of Sweden. Open Access is, today, a relatively well-known concept at universities and university colleges, which presumably is one of the reasons why all the seminars have attracted a great number of researchers and doctoral candidates. The details on how Open Access publishing works are, however, not equally well known, and therefore this type of seminars work in an informative and elucidatory way concerning, for example, parallel publishing, copyright, and increased visibility. It is clear that the libraries now find themselves in a new phase regarding their work with Open Access. Focused information work will be needed for a time to come at our Swedish universities and university colleges on account of the position recently adopted by the Swedish Research Council in regard to Open Access demanding that research funded by the Council must be openly accessible within 6 months after publication. This means that the research libraries will keep playing an important role. In this article we, who have participated in the project, want to convey our experiences from the seminars which have been carried out and discuss the further work of the research libraries to inform and support researchers in matters concerning Open Access.

  • 54. Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Svensson, Aina
    Creating OA Information for Researchers2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open Access Information is a website containing digital learning resources within different aspects of Open Access. The resources consist of text documents, power point presentations and flyers which are free for all to access and download. The purpose is to contribute to growing competence and awareness of Open Access publishing and self-archiving among researchers. More time and effort can be devoted to teaching and marketing by sharing learning resources among university staff. Working in this way we aim to increase the number of records in Swedish OA repositories. Seven Swedish universities have jointly produced these resources with backing from the National Library of Sweden. All resources are published under a Creative Commons licence, which means that users are able to download, reuse and also upload changed and updated material. The Open Access Information will continue to enhance its website and introduce Open Access to researchers by giving six seminars on the subject at Swedish universities during the period autumn 2008 and spring 2009.

  • 55. Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Svensson, Aina
    Stjernberg, Helena
    Open access vid svenska lärosäten: från motvind till medvind?2010In: Infotrend - Nordisk tidskrift för informationsspecialister, ISSN 1653-0225, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 32-39Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From the autumn of 2008 up to the autumn of 2009 five seminars have been carried out at Swedish universities and university colleges with the purpose of increasing researchers’ knowledge of Open Access. The seminars have been arranged within the project ”Researcher meetings on Open Access” which is funded by the program OpenAcess.se of the National Library of Sweden. Open Access is, today, a relatively well-known concept at universities and university colleges, which presumably is one of the reasons why all the seminars have attracted a great number of researchers and doctoral candidates. The details on how Open Access publishing works are, however, not equally well known, and therefore this type of seminars work in an informative and elucidatory way concerning, for example, parallel publishing, copyright, and increased visibility. It is clear that the libraries now find themselves in a new phase regarding their work with Open Access. Focused information work will be needed for a time to come at our Swedish universities and university colleges on account of the position recently adopted by the Swedish Research Council in regard to Open Access demanding that research funded by the Council must be openly accessible within 6 months after publication. This means that the research libraries will keep playing an important role. In this article we, who have participated in the project, want to convey our experiences from the seminars which have been carried out and discuss the further work of the research libraries to inform and support researchers in matters concerning Open Access.

  • 56.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Wessels, Bridgette A.
    Sveinsdottir, Thordis
    Noorman, Merel
    How Can Libraries and Other Academic Institutions Engage in Making Data Open?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will address the questions of what and where the value of open access to research data might be and how libraries and related stakeholders can contribute to achieve the benefits of freely sharing data. In particular, the emphasis will be on how libraries need to acquire the competence for collaboration to train and encourage researchers and library staff to work with open data. The paper is based on the early results of the RECODE project, an EU FP7 project that addresses the drivers and barriers in developing open access to research data in Europe (http://www.recodeproject.eu).

  • 57.
    Linde, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Wessels, Bridgette
    Smallwood, Rod
    Price, Lada
    Noorman, Merel
    Wyatt, Sally
    Sondervan, Jeroen
    Feasibility of using existing open access networks to support the harmonization of open access2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we identify and assess different options for bringing together and mobilizing relevant stakeholders in the open access arena. This builds on previous work done in the RECODE project about the open access stakeholder ecosystem, the barriers and the enablers for open access to research data as well as on the RECODE overarching policy recommendations set out in the RECODE work package 5. We have identified a sample of existing networks and organizations to determine whether they are able to meet stakeholder needs and mobilization objectives for open access, data preservation, dissemination and use, and what these organizations can or must do in order to better mobilize stakeholders in order to meet the policy recommendations. We have identified not only examples of good practice but also the barriers not addressed by any currently available structures or organizations. While there are many forces striving to make data sharing common practice, there is still a lack of an overarching, international initiative to implement necessary requirements for making data sharing a truly international community asset. Within the European community the prerequisites and the ambitions are very different among the member states. Even amongst those countries where open access has long been on the agenda, there remain issues and barriers to be addressed. For example, training is needed in most of the stakeholder groups; investment in infrastructure building and funding is required in most institutions dealing with open access to research data; much work remains to be done to convince researchers that sharing data is a good idea. These are just a few of the obstacles that still need attention despite good, on-going efforts by individuals, organizations and states.

  • 58. Martens, Bob
    et al.
    Linde, Peter
    Klinc, Robert
    Holmberg, Per
    Enhancing the Sustainability of Electronic Access to ELPUB Proceedings: Means for Long-term Dissemination2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ELPUB can look back on a track record of a steadily growing number of conference papers. From a long-term perspective, access to this body of knowledge is of great interest to the community. Beyond this, extended preoccupation with the collected scientific work in the area of digital publishing has to be mentioned. Naturally, the authors are particularly focussed on the individual paper itself and possible connections with related efforts. Typically, conferences amplify and enhance opportunities of “getting- together”. A well-stocked repository may, however, serve in this respect as a fruitful complementary addition. In this contribution, the implementation of persistent identifiers on the existing ELPUB.scix.net-base is elaborated in detail. Furthermore, the authors present the result of efforts related to the harvesting of ELPUB-metadata and to the creation of a citation index. The paper concludes with an outlook on future plans.

  • 59. Noorman, Merel
    et al.
    Kalaitzi, Vasso
    Angelaki, Marina
    Tsoukala, Victoria
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Sveinsdottir, Thordis
    Price, Lada
    Wessels, Bridgette
    Institutional barriers and good practice solutions2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open access to research data provides many benefits to science and society, but as the open access trend grows it becomes increasingly clear that providing unrestricted access to research data is not inherently a “good thing”, and it is certainly not easy to achieve. The RECODE project looks at the grand challenges associated with open access and data preservation and dissemination, including technological and infrastructural, legal and ethical, and institutional and policy issues. In particular, it seeks to understand and use the fragmentation between and within disciplines in order to address these challenges. The aim is to produce policy recommendations for open access to research data, based on existing good practice. In this fourth RECODE deliverable we focus on the challenges faced by institutions, such as archives, libraries, universities, data centres and funding bodies, in making open access to research data possible. Policy makers and the scientific community expect these institutions to play an important role in creating and funding data sharing infrastructures and stimulating and assisting researchers to make their research material public. They look towards these institutions to curate and preserve information, and provide guidance to researchers in managing their data.

  • 60.
    Sveinsdottir, Thordis
    et al.
    Trilateral Research and Consulting, GBR.
    Wessels, Bridgette
    University of Sheffield, GBR.
    Smallwood, Rod
    University of Sheffield, GBR.
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Kala, Vasso
    National Centre of Medical Documentation, GRC.
    Tsoukala, Victoria
    National Hellenic Research Foundation, GRC.
    Sondervan, Jeroen
    University of Amsterdam, NLD.
    Policy recommendations for Open Access to research data in Europe-Stakeholder values and ecosystems2014In: Information Services and Use, ISSN 0167-5265, E-ISSN 1875-8789, Vol. 34, no 3-4, p. 331-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RECODE will leverage existing networks, communities and projects to address challenges within the open access and data dissemination and preservation sector, and produce policy recommendations for open access to research data based on existing good practice. The open access to research data sector includes several different networks, initiatives, projects and communities that are fragmented by discipline, geography, stakeholder category (publishers, academics, repositories, etc.) as well as other boundaries. Many of these organisations are already addressing key barriers to open access to research data, such as stakeholder fragmentation, technical and infrastructural issues, ethical and legal issues, and state and institutional policy fragmentation. However, these organisations are often working in isolation or with limited contact with one another. RECODE will provide a space for European stakeholders interested in open access to research data to work together to provide common solutions for these issues. RECODE will culminate in a series of over-arching policy recommendations for a policy framework to support open access to European research data targeted at different stakeholders and policy-makers (http://www.recodeproject.eu). © 2014-IOS Press and the authors.

  • 61. Sveinsdottir, Thordis
    et al.
    Wessels, Bridgette
    Smallwood, Rod
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Kalla, Vasso
    Tsoukala, Victoria
    Sondervan, Jeroen
    Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the deliverable for Work Package 1 (WP1), Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems, of the EU FP7 funded project RECODE (Grant Agreement No: 321463), which focuses on developing Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe. WP1 focuses on understanding stakeholder values and ecosystems in Open Access, dissemination and preservation in the area of scientific and scholarly data (thus not government data). The objectives of this WP are as follows: • Identify and map the diverse range of stakeholder values in Open Access data and data dissemination and preservation. • Map stakeholder values on to research ecosystems using case studies from different disciplinary perspectives. • Conduct a workshop to evaluate and identify good practice in addressing conflicting value chains and stakeholder fragmentation.

  • 62. Tsoukala, Victoria
    et al.
    Angelaki, Marina
    Kalaitzi, Vasso
    Wessels, Bridgette
    Price, Lada
    Taylor, Mark
    Smallwood, Rod
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Sondervan, Jeroen
    Reilly, Susan
    Policy guidelines for open access and data dissemination and preservation2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The RECODE project identified two overarching issues that are inhibiting take-up of policies related to open access to research data: a lack of a coherent open data ecosystem; and a lack of attention to the specificity of research practices, processes and forms of data collections. Against this background, the report provides policy recommendations on open access to research data targeted at key stakeholders in promoting open access: research funders; data managers; research institutions; and publishers. These recommendations will assist the above stakeholders in furthering the goals of open access to research data in each of their organizations and networks. Recommendations include both overarching and stakeholder-specific ones as suggestions to address and attend to these two issues by building on or learning from existing experience. In doing so, RECODE recognises that in some situations it is appropriate to build consensus and transfer good practice across disciplines and stakeholder groups, while in others it is appropriate to enable and support specific groups to maintain their particularity in relation to disseminating, preserving and re-using research data. In addition, for each stakeholder group good practice examples are provided that can serve as “models” for providing open access to research data. Finally, the recommendations and good practice examples will reduce “costs” associated with providing open access, as stakeholders do not need to develop their own expertise, but can use this information as a foundation to develop their own policies, support actions and initiatives.

  • 63. Wessels, Bridgette
    et al.
    Finn, Rachel L.
    Linde, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, The Library.
    Mazzetti, Paolo
    Nativi, Stefano
    Riley, Susan
    Smallwood, Rod
    Taylor, Mark J.
    Tsoukala, Victoria
    Wadhwa, Kush
    Issues in the development of open access to research data2014In: Prometheus, ISSN 0810-9028, E-ISSN 1470-1030, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 49-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores key issues in the development of open access to research data. The use of digital means for developing, storing and manipulating data is creating a focus on ‘data-driven science’. One aspect of this focus is the development of ‘open access’ to research data. Open access to research data refers to the way in which various types of data are openly available to public and private stakeholders, user communities and citizens. Open access to research data, however, involves more than simply providing easier and wider access to data for potential user groups. The development of open access requires attention to the ways data are considered in different areas of research. We identify how open access is being unevenly developed across the research environment and the consequences this has in terms of generating data gaps. Data gaps refer to the way data becomes detached from published conclusions. To address these issues, we examine four main areas in developing open access to research data: stakeholder roles and values; technological requirements for managing and sharing data; legal and ethical regulations and procedures; institutional roles and policy frameworks. We conclude that problems of variability and consistency across the open access ecosystem need to be addressed within and between these areas to ensure that risks surrounding a data gap are managed in open access.

12 51 - 63 of 63
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