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  • 1.
    Abela, Paul
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Roquet, Omar
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Zeaiter, Ali Armand
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Determining Organisational Readiness for the Future-Fit for Business Benchmark2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Ahmed, Kwaku
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hatira, Lamia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Valva, Paul
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    How can the construction industry in Ghana become sustainable?2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Sub-Saharan African country of Ghana is growing at a rapid pace. The construction industry is striving to keep up with the increasing demand for housing and commercial and industrial space while simultaneously protecting the physical environment and social well-being of the country – a challenge becoming known in the industry as ‘sustainable construction.’ This paper proposes a strategic approach to manage these twin challenges, consisting of two parts: a building rating system and a participatory method called multi-stakeholder dialogue. The combination rating system and MSD process was presented to the industry to determine its potential effectiveness in assisting the industry to move towards sustainability. The industry’s response indicates that the proposal could be of value to the industry, with certain noted limitations. This paper describes the rating system-MSD proposal, the industry’s response, and implications for the construction industry in Ghana moving forward

  • 3.
    Aldabaldetreku, Rita
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Lautiainen, Juuso
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Minkova, Alina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Role of Knowledge Management in Strategic Sustainable Development: Comparing Theory and Practice in Companies Applying the FSSD2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the role of knowledge management (KM) in integrating sustainability into business strategy in companies applying the framework for strategic sustainable development (FSSD).Corporations have the potential to be key players in moving society towards sustainability, but they lack clear definitions and guidelines around strategic sustainable development (SSD). The authors focus on the benefits of KM in organisations applying the FSSD, which offers general strategic guidelines, but does not refer to the complexity of managing the new sustainability knowledge.This study first examines the scientific literature around KM and FSSD and compares it with the results of expert interviews to develop a State of the Art Model of KM for SSD. Then the model is compared to current practices of corporations applying the FSSD and the gap is examined.The results of the analysis show that the concept of KM is widely discussed in the literature, yet it does not have much presence in the business world. The value of knowledge is recognised, but KM is not much used and no structured practices were identified. It was concluded that companies would benefit from a strategic KM system when integrating sustainability.

  • 4.
    Allouh, Ahmad
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Maurer, Robert
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Walker, Fiona
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Wilcox Gwynne, Rebecca Heather
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Designing a Socially Sustainable Impact Sourcing Model for Integrating Immigrants in Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research proposes a socially sustainable impact sourcing model (SSISM), pertinent to the field of socially responsible outsourcing and offers recommendations for integrating immigrants in Sweden by using this model. The model brings businesses, communities and people together to create benefits for all stakeholders in a sustainable way.

     

    Sweden has a long history of accepting immigrants, yet, has a comparably low success rate of integrating non-Swedish people into society. If SSISM is applied in Sweden, there is a potential for businesses to save money, for challenges like the integration problem to be mitigated, and for communities to benefit from an increased tax base as well as building stronger, more diverse communities.

     

    The universal model for SSISM was developed through the analysis of existing practices and the use of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD), a sustainability planning tool. The research process included informal interviews with businesses, communities and government agencies, formal interviews with businesses, and a survey with immigrants. The interviews and survey helped maintain relevance to the Swedish context and identified potential obstacles and enablers for implementation. From the results, recommendations on how to best apply the model for integrating immigrants into Sweden were developed in the discussion.

  • 5.
    Alves, Sérgio
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Fercho, Wiebke
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Scott, Erica
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Stories We Tell: Designing Values-Oriented Narratives of Radical Change Initiatives Towards Sustainability2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    While extensive communication around the sustainability challenges have lead to increased awareness, the expected behavior change correspondent to that level of awareness has not been observed. After decades of information-based sustainability communication the research community recognizes values as important drivers of peoples behavior. Consequently, communication needs to be designed intentionally, so as to implement the change necessary in order to shift society to a sustainable level where the global community lives within the planetary boundaries. This thesis was inspired by this call from the field of sustainability science for a new narrative around sustainability that would inspire more radical change. In the first step we used the European Citizens ́ Initiative for an Unconditional Basic Income (EUBI) as a case study, to analyze what types of values the current narrative of the EUBI speaks to and compare that with the values of the population of the European Union. In the second step our research focused on what types of Guidelines could be developed so as to intentionally design a values-oriented narrative. We identified three ways in which the narrative of EUBI is misaligned with the values of the population of the European Union. We identified as well 13 Guidelines for designing a values-oriented narrative that could contribute in moving society strategically towards sustainability. When utilizing the Guidelines as a tool in crafting a potentially more successful narrative as part of a new sustainability communication, the contribution to SSD may be to strategically overcome the above described misalignment and inspiring more action to bridge the gap.

  • 6.
    Amlaeva, Anzhelika
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Feyzioğlu, Saide Begüm
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    ElKambergy, Hadel Mohammed Iskander
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainability Governance Initiatives in Universities as a Tool for Sustainability2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Apelman, Lisa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Klawitter, Raik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Wenzel, Simone
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Organizations as Functioning Social Systems: A Review of Social Sustainability in Management and Organizational Research2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the reasons, why it is difficult to implement the concept of social sustainability into organizations, is its inherent complexity and vagueness. The new Social Sustainability Principles (SSPs) within the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) offer a clear definition of success for the social system. This study aims to put the new SSPs into an organizational context. It investigates how people-related issues within organizations, discussed in six organizational and management journals, published between 2009 and 2014, are related to the SSPs. One fourth of the 3305 reviewed articles were found to relate to social sustainability. Most of the articles focused on improving performance through aspects related to social sustainability. The articles mainly discussed aspects related to barriers to the SSPs as problems, solutions or positive aspects that could remove barriers to the SSPs. The results show that for organizational research to be able to support organizations moving towards social sustainability, there is a need for a clear definition of success as well as a frame that takes the whole social system into consideration. The FSSD and the SSPs could help to structure the diverse topics, put research problems in a bigger context and discern relevant problems and solutions.

  • 8.
    Arai, Keigo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Pia, Fernanda
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    La Ray Armstrong, Kristopher
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Transitioning towards Sustainability: What are we waiting for?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing consensus that humanity is being confronted with a sustainability challenge of which the severity has never been known to modern man. This pressing situation is demanding solutions and alternatives to change the path of society. At the community level, grassroots movements have emerged around the world as a way of striving to develop local sustainability.  This research studies the Transition Movement, a popular, global community-based movement. The aim of this study is to evaluate if a Transition Initiative is effective in moving a local community towards sustainability. The definition of sustainability used in the research is taken from the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) which comprises of eight sustainability principles (SPs); three ecological SPs and five social SPs. To this end, an analytical-evaluative case study of a single Transition Initiative was conducted in which semi-structured interviews, a survey and document analysis were all use as sources of information. The researchers chose a small-scale Transition Initiative, conducting the case study on the village of Ungersheim, France. The results revealed that the actions of Transition are contributing to progressing Ungersheim towards sustainability, both socially and ecologically. The research also revealed how the Transition is being done and what critical factors allowed for success. The study finally deduces a set of strategic guidelines that may be used for further longitudinal research cross-evaluating Ungersheim to other small-scale community transitions. 

  • 9.
    Archer, Isaiah
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Muirhead, Lewis
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Forrester-Wilson, Sarah
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Exploring Holacracy’s Influence on Social Sustainability Through the Lens of Adaptive Capacity2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The organizational structure of Holacracy has been gaining popularity in recent years,

    but a lack of academic research on Holacracy called for a systematic approach to assessing its

    merits and shortcomings. The need Holacracy fills, is that of organizations dealing with a

    complex world and rapidly evolving technology. While Holacracy is not tailored to address

    sustainability issues, there are many components that made it a candidate for the researchers to

    examine it through a social sustainability lens.

    This study examines the effect of specific components of Holacracy with elements of adaptive

    capacity – a theory from which the research definition of social sustainability was built. With

    the goal of determining the effect of Holacracy on social sustainability, a questionnaire directed

    at employees and practitioners of holacratic organizations was utilized.

    The findings implied that Holacracy does positively influence the experience of the elements

    of adaptive capacity; with the relationship to the adaptive capacity element of self-organization

    being a standout. The importance of trust is also identified. The link to the Framework for

    Strategic Sustainable Development can be elucidated through adaptive capacity’s influence to

    the social sustainability principles. Because of the importance of social sustainability and social

    capital to organizational performance and longevity, this research is of value to any business

    using, or considering using Holacracy.

  • 10.
    Ayers, James
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Melchert, Gabriel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Piwowar, Julius
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Impact of Renewable Energy Cooperatives on the Social Resilience of Their Communities2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Major global problems, manifested by climate change and social inequality, reinforce the need for a societal shift towards sustainable practices. This transition requires new approaches in the future design of society. The current energy system, based on fossil fuels and centralized infrastructure is a key contributor to many of the socio-ecological issues related to the sustainability challenge. The intent of this research is to examine renewable energy cooperatives as an alternative to minimize the negative impacts of the current energy system. Using a Strategic Sustainable Development (SSD) approach with a Resilience Attribute Framework, this research explored the presence of resilience attributes (Trust, Diversity, Learning and Self-organization) and sustainability behavior in renewable energy cooperatives. The research then explored, through interview and surveys, the perceived impacts that these cooperatives had on the resilience and sustainability behavior of the wider community. Findings showed that energy cooperatives displayed high levels of the resilience through the attributes of: - Trust: due to non-profit status, ownership structure, localisation and shared values - Diversity: due to member and service diversity - Learning: through collaboration, diverse member knowledge and participation - Self-organization: due to cooperative development, leadership and outcomes (infrastructure and energy knowledge). This study showed that renewable energy cooperatives have numerous impacts on their community however; there were no significant evidence to suggest energy cooperatives transferred their high levels of social resilience to the community.

  • 11.
    Azuma, Chieko
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Coletinha, Elvio
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Villoch, Pablo
    An Exploratory Journey into Sustainability Changemakers Learning Programs2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity is facing highly complex challenges at a global scale. A new sort of conscious sustainability changemakers is needed to face the sustainability challenge. However the mainstream entrepreneurship education tends to focus on business as usual skills, with a significant lack of comprehensive understanding of the whole system and the inner work needed to face the mental barriers to become sustainability changemakers. While the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development was used as a structured approach to the topic, the research design was based on a dynamic research interactive model. Theory U guided the data gathering process that included participatory observation, dialogues with the organizers and participants through the seven progressive schools in Europe. The research aims to identify the common assumptions that guide the design of leading edge learning programs for sustainability changemakers. Building on the findings, the authors present a prototype of a learning tool in a form of self-reflection card game with the intention of helping the next generation of changemakers in their learning journey towards sustainability. Conclusions detail specific guidelines to design a learning program of changemakers towards sustainability.

  • 12.
    Bajraktari, Florentina
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Mosse, Rosamund
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Neira Voto, Gabriel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Transforming U.Lab: Re-designing a participatory methodology using a strategic sustainable perspective2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently society is facing a set of interconnected challenges, known collectively as the Sustainability Challenge, which are systematically increasing socio-ecological unsustainability on a scale never experienced before.

     In order to address the Sustainability Challenge, Social Labs provide an approach that is systemic, participatory and emergent, enabling solutions that are responsive to the dynamic nature of those interconnected challenges.

    Our research explores how a specific lab - U.Lab - can be re-designed in order to move society strategically toward a sustainable future. We use the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, designed to help practitioners to facilitate society’s transition towards sustainable development, as well as concepts of strategic sustainable development, which support s shift from unsustainable systems, structures and practices towards sustainable ones in a strategic way.

    Our research follows Design Research Methodology (DRM). DRM aims for the formulation, validation and development of theories and models in the field of design.

    U.Lab’s experiential response to the Sustainability Challenge inspires participants to question paradigms of thought and societal norms. However, U.Lab is still an emerging social technology and lacks boundary conditions and a scientific basis for understanding our current reality and creating the solutions that will lead society systematically towards a sustainable future.

  • 13. Barkan, Anna
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, Daniel
    Postel, Olaf
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainable Product Development: A Case of an SME in the Sealing Industry2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our study we provide a case study of implementing sustainability aspects into the product development process of a Small and Medium Enterprise (SME). The objective of the study is to, together with the company, co-create a product development process that represents a step towards sustainability. For this a tool called the Method for Sustainable Product Development (MSPD) is used. The methodology of the study includes mapping the current product development process in the organization, adapting the MSPD based on criteria set by the organization, implementing the MSPD into the product development process of the organization in a co-creative way and finally applying the new product development process to a test case within the organization. Various participatory action techniques including workshops and interviews are used to ensure co-creation of the results. It was found that raising questions on sustainability aspects in product development can be seen as a first step of an organizational move towards sustainability. With this the MSPD worked as intended. The practical application showed that further steps were necessary. Particularly additional education in sustainability and theinvolvement of entities in the organization external to the product development process were found as crucial next steps.

  • 14.
    Barzandeh, Fakhri
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Haug, Lynn-Katrin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Jannink, Alisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Planning for Refugee Settlement and Integration: A Strategic Social Sustainability Approach2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how municipal planning for refugee settlement and integration can move strategically towards sustainability. A conceptual framework was developed by integrating the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development with best practices and recommendations identified in the literature. A case study was conducted in Karlskrona, Sweden, to investigate how a municipality plans to settle and integrate a large and unprecedented influx of refugees, and to assess how the constructed Framework can assist in planning. Semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in the Karlskrona Municipality were conducted. Keywords from the constructed Framework were used as a priori codes, to analyze the data obtained in the interviews. As perceived in our case study there is no full understanding of the importance of reaching Social Sustainability and all the essential aspects needed to achieve it.

  • 15. Baugher, John Eric
    et al.
    Osika, Walter
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ecological Consciousness, Moral Imagination,and the Framework for Strategic SustainableDevelopment2016In: Creative Social Change: Leadership for a Healthy World / [ed] Kathryn Goldman Schuyler, John Eric Baugher, Karin Jironet, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016, p. 119-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bergman, Jenny
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Knudsen, Cristina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Seely, Kate
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Building Collaborative Relationships for a Sustainable Finance System2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Society today faces unprecedented social and environmental challenges that are both complex in nature and require immediate and severe action. The financial system is a complex system that has an important impact on the sustainable development of society. Currently, however, the role of the finance system in sustainability is ambivalent, as it invests both in the causes of the sustainability challenge as well as its potential solutions. As the finance system is a complex system collaboration is needed to make change possible. Relationships are a key component of collaboration, and this research looks closer at how relationship building can enable effective collaboration aimed at finance systems change. Research draws on Literature, and a case study of the Finance Innovation Lab including 19 qualitative interviews. In order to build collaborative relationships for a sustainable finance system the results point to: 1) the importance of the individual being present in the initiative rather than the organization they represent, and the importance of connecting on personal level; 2) the complexity of relationship building, with different processes and key elements interrelating; and 3) collaborative relationships being only one part of systemic transformation, requiring also a diversity of people and a clear structure and common strategy to be effective in achieving their goals.

  • 17.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Dasari, Siva Krishna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Petter, Andersson
    GKN Aerospace Systems , SWE.
    Model-based decision support for value and sustainability assessment: Applying machine learning in aerospace product development2018In: DS92: Proceedings of the DESIGN 2018 15th International Design Conference / [ed] Marjanović D., Štorga M., Škec S., Bojčetić N., Pavković N, The Design Society, 2018, Vol. 6, p. 2585-2596Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a prescriptive approach toward the integration of value and sustainability models in an automated decision support environment enabled by machine learning (ML). The approach allows the concurrent multidimensional analysis of design cases complementing mechanical simulation results with value and sustainability assessment. ML allows to deal with both qualitative and quantitative data and to create surrogate models for quicker design space exploration. The approach has been developed and preliminary implemented in collaboration with a major aerospace sub-system manufacturer.

  • 18.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Dasari, Siva Krishna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Petter
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, SWE.
    Integration of Value and Sustainability Assessment in Design Space Exploration by Machine Learning: An Aerospace Application2019In: Design ScienceArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Hallstedt, Sophie
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Isaksson, Ola
    GKN Aerospace Sweden.
    A model-based approach for sustainability and value assessment in the aerospace value chain2015In: Advances in Mechanical Engineering, ISSN 1687-8132, E-ISSN 1687-8140, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aerospace industry, systems engineering practices have been exercised for years, as a way to turn high-level design objectives into concrete targets on system functionality (e.g. range, noise, and reliability). More difficult is to decompose and clarify sustainability implications in the same way and to compare them against performance-related capabilities already during preliminary design. This article addresses the problem of bringing the important—yet typically high level and complex—sustainability aspects into engineering practices. It proposes a novel integrated model-based method that provides a consistent way of addressing the well-known lack of generic and integrated ways of clarifying both cost and value consequences of sustainability in early phases. It further presents the development and implementation of such approach in two separate case studies conducted in collaboration with a major aero-engine sub-system manufacturer. The first case concerns the assessment of alternative business configurations to maintain scarce materials in closed loops, while the second one concerns the production technology of an aero-engine component. Eventually, this article highlights the learning generated by the development and implementation of these approaches and discusses opportunities for further development of model-based support.

  • 20.
    Bhalerao, Akash
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Louwerse, Sjaak
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Quarmyne, Michael Tei
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ritchie, Dan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Social Innovation Hubs Supporting Social Entrepreneurs: Strategically Adopting the SDGs towards Sustainability2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a well-known and comprehensive framework for sustainable development. However due to the overlapping and interrelated nature of the goals, action towards one goal can positively or negatively contribute to another.Social innovation hubs including Impact Hub and Centre for Social Innovation use the SDGs to support social entrepreneurs to have a positive impact. Document analysis and interviews with 15 practitioners from these hubs informed the research on how the organizations perceive and contribute to sustainability, how they integrate the SDGs, and the challenges and benefits with using the SDGs. Based on that, this research has developed five recommendations for social innovation hubs to: 1) Define Sustainability; 2) Enhance Visioning; 3) Design co-creative programs; 4) Define Impact;and 5) Communicate Impact. While other elements of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) could be used to complement the SDGs, the Sustainability Principles (SPs) of the FSSD are recommended as a definition for sustainability.

  • 21.
    BONNELL, HARRY
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    LI, PING
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    VAN LINGEN, THEKLA
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nonviolent Communication: a Communication Tool to support the Adaptive Capacity of Organisations?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive capacity is essential for organisations to be able to adapt to the sustainability challenge, and change its course. Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is an interpersonal communication tool that enables a user to move from a language of judgements to a language of needs by using 4 steps: observation, feelings, needs, and request. As communication is essential to the adaptive capacity of a social system, this thesis explores the question: How does Nonviolent Communication support the adaptive capacity of organisations? Through a mixed methods approach (semi-structured interviews and surveys with NVC trainers, organisational representatives and employees), the effects of NVC on communication in 3 sample organisations in the Netherlands (a school, NGO and research institute), is explored. Quantitative survey results show that NVC has a positive to very positive effect on common organisational communication dynamics. Qualitative data supports this finding and shows that NVC brings positive effects of increased understanding, listening, and progress in work related issues through an increased awareness of one’s own and other’s needs and feelings. When linking these results to adaptive capacity of organisations, it is concluded that NVC directly supports the adaptive capacity elements of trust, diversity and learning, and indirectly supports common meaning and self-organisation.

  • 22.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Electric buses' sustainability effects, noise, energy use, and costs2019In: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric buses are growing in numbers in Sweden, which contributes to the development of a fossil fuel free society and a reduction of emissions. Earlier studies of bus systems have identified a need to further investigate societal costs, total cost of ownership, energy use on a yearly basis to account for seasonal variations, and noise during acceleration. Addressing those needs was the purpose of this study. 

    Investigations were made in five cities in Sweden that have recently implemented different electric buses in their respective public transport system. Based on results from these investigations and earlier studies, updated and new calculations were made for electric buses on route 1 in Karlskrona, as a representative example. It was found that there were significant savings in societal costs and total cost of ownership when compared to diesel and biogas powered buses, mainly due to decreased noise, no emissions in the use phase, and decreased energy use.

  • 23.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Improvements of students learning through changes in feedback and examinations in introduction to strategic sustainable development 7,5 credits2018In: Lärarlärdom 2018 / [ed] Claes Dahlqvist, Kristianstad, 2018, p. 26-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year at the Blekinge Institute of Technology, in total 15-30 international master students from the Structural Dynamics and the Erasmus program take a 7.5 credit course in strategic sustainable development. In 2016, the course had rather good scoresfrom the students’ course evaluation, but the students also identified a need for improvements regarding feedback from teachers during the course and also regarding the examination of the course. A study was therefore initiated, aimed at finding out if changes in feedback and examinations can increase students’ learning towards the learning outcomes in the course, and if so, how the teaching and examination in the course could be developed in such direction. The study found through literature review, interviews among colleagues, and surveys among students that instead of a final exam, several knowledge tests and reflective questions during the course could increase the students’ learning. The course design was developed and then implemented in 2017. According to the students’ course evaluation the same year, this lead to even better perceived learning. Except from providing further evidence that students’ learning increases with individual feedback, the study showed how that can be implemented.

  • 24.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Sustainable Personal Road Transport: The Role of Electric Vehicles2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric vehicles can play an important role in a future sustainable road transport system and many Swedish politicians would like to see them implemented faster. This is likely desirable to reach the target of a fossil independent vehicle fleet in Sweden by 2030 and a greenhouse gas neutral Swedish society no later than 2050. However, to reach both these targets, and certainly to support the full scope of sustainability, it is important to consider the whole life-cycle of the vehicles and also the interaction between the transport sector and other sectors. So far, there are no plans for transitions towards a sustainable transport system applying a sufficiently wide systems perspective, in Sweden or elsewhere. This implies a great risk for sub-optimizations.

    The overall aim of this work is to elaborate methodological support for development of sustainable personal road transport systems that is informed by a strategic sustainable development perspective.

    The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) is used as a foundation for the work to ensure a sufficiently wide systems perspective and coordinated collaboration across disciplines and sectors, both in the research and application. Maxwell’s Qualitative Research Design and the Design Research Methodology are used as overall guides for the research approach. Specific research methods and techniques include literature studies, action research seminars, interviews, and measurements of energy use, costs, and noise. Moreover, a case study on the conditions for a breakthrough for vehicles in southeast Sweden has been used as a test and development platform.

    Specific results include a preliminary vision for electrical vehicles in southeast Sweden, framed by the principled sustainability definition of the FSSD, an assessment of the current reality in relation to that vision, and proposed solutions to bridge the gap, organized into a preliminary roadmap. The studies show that electric vehicles have several sustainability advantages even when their whole life-cycle is considered, provided that they are charged with electricity from new renewable sources. Electrical vehicles also imply a low total cost of ownership and could promote new local ‘green jobs’ under certain conditions. Particularly promising results are seen for electric buses in public transport. As a general result, partly based on the experiences from the specific case, a generic community planning process model is proposed and its usefulness for sustainable transport system development is discussed.

    The strategic sustainable development perspective of this thesis broadens the analysis beyond the more common focus on climate change issues and reduces the risk of sub-optimizations in community and transport system development. The generic support for multi-stakeholder collaboration could potentially also promote a more participatory democratic approach to community development, grounded in a scientific foundation. Future research will explore specific decision support systems for sustainable transport development based on the generic planning process model.

  • 25.
    Borén, Sven
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Towards sustainable personal mobility with electric cars and buses2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to explore if, and then how, electric cars and buses can contribute to sustainable personal mobility. Electric vehicles have increasingly been seen as a potential sustainable solution for the transport sector due to their high energy efficiency, close to zero emissions in the use phase, and the possibility to be powered by electricity from renewable resources. However, there are concerns about future scarcity of resources (e.g. lithium and cobalt for batteries), vehicle range, costs, high energy use in the production of batteries, as well as insufficient scientific support for how electric vehicles could be a part of a transition towards sustainability regarding personal mobility.  

    The challenges for a fast transition towards sustainability are large and many. The transport sector is not contributing to such development, mainly due to emissions, use of fossil energy, and use of materials mined and recycled under unacceptable conditions. Furthermore, existing societal goals (e.g. fossil-fuel independent vehicle fleet by 2030 in Sweden, UN Agenda 2030, and the Paris agreement) are insufficient for sustainability and are not complemented by concrete plans or an approach for how to engage stakeholders and achieve coordinated actions for sustainability. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development includes a principled definition of sustainability that is necessary and sufficient for sustainability and procedural support for collaborative innovation for a strategic transition to fulfillment of that definition, which is why it has been used as an overarching methodology in this thesis. 

    The research verified through several studies conditions for how electric vehicles can play a vital role in a strategic transition of personal mobility towards sustainability. Through stakeholder collaboration (e.g. interviews and workshops), a vision for sustainable transport with a focus on electric vehicles and an initial development plan towards that vision were designed. Several life cycle focused studies investigated (through calculations and data collection from literature, life cycle databases, interviews and workshops) about environmental and social impacts and costs for electric cars and buses. The stakeholder collaboration, combined with conceptual modelling, also resulted in models for generic support for multi-stakeholder collaboration and planning for strategic sustainable development of transport systems and communities, and for how to include electric buses in the procurement model of public transport.

    The strategic sustainable development perspective of this thesis broadens the analysis beyond the more common focus on climate change issues and should be able to reduce the risk of sub-optimizations in community and transport system development when applied in that context. The generic support for multi-stakeholder collaboration could potentially also promote a more participatory democratic approach to community development, grounded in a scientific foundation.

  • 26.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Grauers, Anders
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Stakeholder collaboration models for public transport procurement of electric bus systems2019In: The International Journal of Sustainability Policy and Practice, ISSN 2325-1166, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies have mainly focused on technology, economy and advantages of electric buses, and they have largely shown that electric buses could be one of the solutions for sustainable public transport. Despite this, the present procurement process for public transport in Sweden is not suitable for including support systems for electric buses. This study was aimed to find a stakeholder collaboration model that would allow electric bus systems to be more effectively included in the procurement process for public transport. The results were achieved by several multi-stakeholder collaboration seminars and meetings that included representatives from regional public transport authorities, bus operators, bus manufacturers, energy companies, municipalities, and experts involved in bus transport. The study primarily developed two stakeholder collaboration models, suggesting that charging infrastructure should be designed separately from the common procurement process. In these models, energy companies, electric grid owners, charging infrastructure operators, regional public transport authorities, and municipalities need to collaborate. The first model is designed for a system that includes chargers at certain locations along a route and/or stakeholders with a low level of experience of electric bus systems, while the second is designed for a system that includes bus charging at the depot and/or stakeholders with a high level of experience of electric bus systems.

  • 27.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Preference of Electric Buses in Public Transport: Conclusions from Real Life Testing in Eight Swedish Municipalities2016In: Proceedings of ICSUTE 2016, 2016, Vol. 10, p. 255-264Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a theoretical perspective, Electric buses can be more sustainable and can be cheaper than fossil fuelled buses in city traffic. The authors have not found other studies based on actual urban public transport in Swedish winter climate. Further on, noise measurements from buses for the European market where found old. The aims of this follow-up study was therefore to test and possibly verify in a real-life environment how energy efficient and silent electric buses are, and then conclude on if electric buses are preferable to use in public transport. The Ebusco 2.0 electric bus, fitted with a 311 kWh battery pack, was used and the tests carried out during November 2014 to April 2015 in eight municipalities in the south of Sweden. Six tests took place in urban traffic and two took place in more of a rural traffic setting. The energy use for propulsion was measured via logging of the internal system in the bus and via an external charging meter. The average energy use turned out to be 8 % less (0,96 kWh/km) than assumed in the earlier theoretical study. This rate allows for a 320 km range in public urban traffic. The interior of the bus was kept warm by a diesel heater (biodiesel will probably be used in a future operational traffic situation), which used 0,67 kWh/km in January. This verified that electric buses can be up to 25% cheaper when used in public transport in cities for about eight years. The noise was found to be lower, primarily during acceleration, than for buses with combustion engines in urban bus traffic. According to our surveys, most passengers and drivers appreciated the silent and comfortable ride and preferred electric buses rather than combustion engine buses. Bus operators and passenger transport executives were also positive to start using electric buses for public transport. The operators did however point out that procurement processes need to account for eventual risks regarding this new technology, along with personnel education. The study revealed that it is possible to establish a charging infrastructure for almost all studied bus lines. However, design of a charging infrastructure for each municipality requires further investigations, including electric grid capacity analysis, smart location of charging points, and tailored schedules to allow fast charging. In conclusion, electric buses proved to be a preferable alternative for all stakeholders involved in public bus transport in the studied municipalities. However, in order to electric buses to be a prominent support for sustainable development, they need to be charged either by stand-alone units or via an expansion of the electric grid, and the electricity should be made from new renewable sources.

  • 28.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Andersson, Mats
    Electrodriving Scandinavia, SWE.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Miljöfordon Syd, SWE.
    Lööf, Jonas
    Miljöfordon Syd, SWE.
    GreenCharge: demotest i fält med elbuss2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    GreenCharge Sydost är en sammanslutning av regionförbund, kommuner, landsting och företag medett övergripande syfte att främja införandet av elfordon i främst sydöstra Sverige. Blekinge TekniskaHögskola är huvudman för projektet med ansvar för att driva forskningen, och Miljöfordon Syd attdriva den operativa projektledningen avseende demonstrationer och samverkan med intressenter.Under 2013 gjorde forskningen inom GreenCharge en beräkningsstudie som påvisade att elbussar urett livscykelperspektiv har mycket mindre utsläpp än dagens dieselbussar och totalkostnaden skullekunna bli 25 % lägre över en 8-års period i Karlskrona på linje 1 och 7, 21 % i Jönköping på linje 1och 3, samt 17 % i Sundsvall på linje 2 och 4. Detta gäller under antagande att bussen drivs med nygrön el, att realränteökningen blir 1 % per år samt att energi-pristrender sedan 10 år tillbaka fortsättergälla framöver.. Beräkningsstudien antog också efter simuleringar utifrån befintliga linjer och aktuellavärden från busstillverkare en energianvändning på 1,04 kWh/km för eldrift.

  • 29.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Trygg, Louise
    Linköpings Tekniska Högskola, SWE.
    A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development - Part 2: the case of a vision for electric vehicle systems in Southeast Sweden2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric vehicles seem to offer a great potential for sustainable transport development. The Swedish pioneer project GreenCharge Southeast is designed as a cooperative action research approach that aims to explore a roadmap for a fossil-free transport system by 2030 with a focus on electric vehicles. In the first paper of this tandem publication, the authors propose a new generic process model embedding the Framework of Strategic Sustainable Development. The purpose of applying it in an action-research mode as described in this paper was twofold: (i) to develop a vision for sustainable regional transport and a coarse roadmap towards that vision, and, while doing so, (ii) get additional empirical experiences to inform the development of the new generic process model. Experts from many sectors and organizations involved in the GreenCharge project provided vital information and reviewed all planning perspectives presented in Paper 1 in two sequential multi-stakeholder seminars. The results include a sustainable vision for electric vehicle systems in southeast Sweden within a sustainable regional transport system within a sustainable global society, as well as an initial development plan towards such a vision for the transport sector. The vision is framed by the universal sustainability principles, and the development plan is informed by the strategic guidelines, of the above-mentioned framework. Among other things, the vision and plan imply a shift to renewable energy and a more optimized use of areas and thus a new type of spatial planning. For example, the vision and plan implies a lower built-in demand for transport, more integrated traffic modes, and more multi-functional use of areas for energy and transport infrastructures, for example. Some inherent benefits of electric vehicles are highlighted in the vision and plan, including near-zero local emissions and flexibility as regards primary energy sources. The vision and plan also imply improved governance for more effective cross-sector collaboration to ensure coor- dinated development within the transport sector and between the transportation sector and other relevant sectors. Meanwhile, the new generic process model was refined and is ready to be applied and further tested in the GreenCharge project and in other projects within the transport sector as well as other sectors. The study confirmed that the new generic process model suggested in support of sus- tainable transport system and community development is helpful for giving diverse stakeholders, with various specialties and perspectives, a way of working that is goal-oriented and builds on effective, iterative learning loops and co-creation. 

  • 30.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    A Strategic Sustainability and Life Cycle Analysis of Electric Vehicles in EU today and by 20502016In: Proceedings of ICSUTE 2016, 2016, Vol. 10, p. 229-237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambitions within the EU for moving towards sustainable transport include major emission reductions for fossil fuel road vehicles, especially for buses, trucks, and cars. The electric driveline seems to be an attractive solution for such development. This study first applied the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development to compare sustainability effects of today’s fossil fuel vehicles with electric vehicles that have batteries or hydrogen fuel cells. The study then addressed a scenario were electric vehicles might be in majority in Europe by 2050. The methodology called Strategic Lifecycle Assessment was first used, were each life cycle phase was assessed for violations against sustainability principles. This indicates where further analysis could be done in order to quantify the magnitude of each violation, and later to create alternative strategies and actions that lead towards sustainability. A Life Cycle Assessment of combustion engine cars, plug-in hybrid cars, battery electric cars and hydrogen fuel cell cars was then conducted to compare and quantify environmental impacts. The authors found major violations of sustainability principles like use of fossil fuels, which contribute to the increase of emission related impacts such as climate change, acidification, eutrophication, ozone depletion, and particulate matters. Other violations were found, such as use of scarce materials for batteries and fuel cells, and also for most life cycle phases for all vehicles when using fossil fuel vehicles for mining, production and transport. Still, the studied current battery and hydrogen fuel cell cars have less severe violations than fossil fuel cars. The life cycle assessment revealed that fossil fuel cars have overall considerably higher environmental impacts compared to electric cars as long as the latter are powered by renewable electricity. By 2050, there will likely be even more sustainable alternatives than the studied electric vehicles when the EU electricity mix mainly should stem from renewable sources, batteries should be recycled, fuel cells should be a mature technology for use in vehicles (containing no scarce materials), and electric drivelines should have replaced combustion engines in other sectors. An uncertainty for fuel cells in 2050 is whether the production of hydrogen will have had time to switch to renewable resources. If so, that would contribute even more to a sustainable development. Except for being adopted in the GreenCharge roadmap, the authors suggest that the results can contribute to planning in the upcoming decades for a sustainable increase of EVs in Europe, and potentially serve as an inspiration for other smaller or larger regions. Further studies could map the environmental effects in LCA further, and include other road vehicles to get a more precise perception of how much they could affect sustainable development.

  • 31.
    Bota, Erica
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Tschendel, Viola
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hernández, Christian Zavala
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Social Sustainability: Exploring the Role of Social Enterprises2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The degradation of the ecological and social systems has largely resulted from human activities that deplete natural resources and undermine human needs in society. Traditional business culture, driven mainly by profit maximization, is a factor that has worsened this sustainability challenge. Social enterprises (SEs) are a form of business that hold the potential to help make the transition towards a sustainable society. The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it explores SE contributions to creating a sustainable social system. Second, it examines how SEs exhibit the dimensions of trustworthiness, leading to trusting relationships in society. Social sustainability principles (SSPs) define social sustainability and are drawn from the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. They are used as a foundation for identifying SE contributions. The researchers draw on experiences from social entrepreneurs and experts in the field of social entrepreneurship. SEs contribute at two levels: the individual level and the societal level. They break down barriers to the SSPs and provide opportunities to individuals with respect to the five principles. SEs operate based on a culture of impartiality and create opportunities for meaning for individuals in their target groups. They consistently take leaps of faith, believing in the trustworthiness of those who are otherwise deemed untrustworthy.

  • 32.
    Bratt, Cecilia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Integrating a Strategic Sustainability Perspective into Eco-Labelling, Procurement and Supply Chain Management2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintaining the current course of the global society is threatening the human civilization. The urgency of the situation, understood from empirical research, has caused many researchers to call for more prescriptive research as a necessary supplement, to better support decision making for sustainability. While policymakers need to direct and stimulate sustainable production and consumption through, e.g., legislation and market phenomena such as eco-labelling, business represents a significant proportion of the necessary resources, capabilities and mechanisms for the innovation needed for a transition towards sustainability. However, while businesses more and more realize the self-interest in working proactively with sustainability, there is a desire for better support for how to do this also from this end. Such support needs to consider a significant shift going on in business; that individual businesses tend to no longer compete as autonomous entities, but rather as supply chains. Thus, no company is more sustainable than its supply chain partners. Therefore, sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) as a business function, and sustainable procurement as a subset thereof, plays an increasingly pivotal role for sustainable development. The overall aim of this thesis is to contribute to sustainable development by studying how three phenomena; eco-labelling, procurement and supply chain management are related to each other and to a strategic sustainability perspective, and to suggest how these phenomena can be integrated with such a perspective to provide better support for decision making and innovation for sustainability. For this purpose, a framework for strategic sustainable development, including a definition of sustainability and generic guidelines to inform stepwise strategic plans towards sustainability, is used as a foundational methodology. The development of new approaches is also based on case studies with eco-labelling and sustainable public procurement bodies, businesses and public institutions. Information is collected by shadowing of criteria development and collaboration processes, interviews and literature studies. While the findings point to a clear rational for all of the phenomena and several strengths in existing schemes and practices, the findings also point to several shortcomings. Sustainability is not defined, and as a result, there is no foundation for strategic and proactive approaches. Furthermore, decisions are not based on considerations of all dimensions of sustainability, the whole life cycle of products, all relevant stakeholders and a long-term perspective. As a result, the full potential of these phenomena for contributing to sustainable development is not utilized. This thesis prescribes enhanced processes for eco-labelling, sustainable procurement and SSCM, and shows how these can support organisations in developing from reacting individually on known sustainability-related problems to acting proactively and collaboratively in supply chains, in a coordinated and economically viable way, on society’s remaining gap to the full scope of ecological and social sustainability.

  • 33.
    Braun, Nicholas
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hutle, Thomas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Vonk, Milan Alexander
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Sustainable City Year Program Public Scholarship for Community Development2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By 2050, an estimated 6.3 billion people or 66% of the world population will live in cities. Therefore, cities are in a high impact position regarding sustainability. The question is, how do we increase awareness of the sustainability challenge among these populations and gain citywide buy-in and multi-stakeholder collaboration to address this challenge? The Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP) at the University of Oregon offers one approach to tackle this issue by matching higher education institutions (HEI’s), with local and regional cities to address their sustainability related needs through publicly engaged scholarship. The objective of this research was to examine how SCYP contributes to strategic sustainable development (SSD). Our research methods included a peer-reviewed literature review, semi-structured interviews, surveys and further document review. Our sources included SCYP co-founders, partner city program managers, strategic sustainable development experts, and municipal planners from around the world. Our research suggests that SCYP creates a subtle paradigm shift towards sustainability among partner city staff and community members while accelerating practical implementation of sustainability related projects. Furthermore, the added layer of SSD concepts can increase the efficacy of this approach and allow the model to embrace a larger systems level perspective over time.

  • 34.
    Broman, Göran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Collins, Terrence
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, USA.
    Basile, George
    Arizona State Univ, USA.
    Baumgartner, Rupert
    Graz Univ, AUT.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Huisingh, Donald
    Univ Tennessee, USA.
    Science in support of systematic leadership towards sustainability2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The un-sustainable course of our societies is the greatest threat humanity has ever confronted. The biophysical systems upon which we are totally dependent have not been challenged by human activities at the global scale before and our impacts upon those planetary systems, as well as upon our social systems, cannot be adequately addressed by ad hoc solutions. Science and leadership will be required to address this threat and transform our current societies into sustainable societies. This Special Volume presents an evolving, yet increasingly cohesive, science-based perspective on leadership towards sustainability. Examples of crucial, overall questions addressed by authors of articles in this Special Volume are: How can science help to clarify sustainability as a foundational platform for success for society's core institutions (e.g. business, governance and education), and how can this platform inform envisioning, planning, monitoring, communication and decision making to accelerate the needed transitions? The conceptual framing of sustainable development in this Special Volume is based upon the logic that it is only if we can define sustainability in a scientifically solid way, as a frame for any vision, that we can analyze current situations in relation to such sustainable visions, and design strategies to close the gap to such visions. In moving from current situations towards possible sustainable futures, specific support in the form of leadership concepts, methods, tools, and requirements are also essential, i.e. given clarity around what needs to be achieved, effective leadership then requires knowing how to achieve it. Both the what and the how questions are addressed in this Special Volume. The research described provides a foundation for moving from ad hoc activities to systemic, systematic and strategic transitions towards sustainability. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  • 35.
    Broman, Göran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    A framework for strategic sustainable development2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, no Part 1, p. 17-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to give a comprehensive and cohesive description of the most recent version of the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD), and also to describe and discuss the overall method for developing the FSSD, elaborate on the general rational for and general benefits of a framework of this type, and Validate benefits of the FSSD through examples of its application. The purpose is also to point to pertinent future work. In preparation of this paper, we have reviewed previous publications and other documents related to the FSSD and reflected on the 25-year learning process between scientists and practitioners. We conclude that the FSSD has proven to aid organizations in thoroughly understanding and putting themselves in context of the global sustainability challenge, and to move themselves strategically towards sustainability, i.e., to stepwise reduce their negative impacts on ecological and social systems at large while strengthening the own organization through capturing of innovation opportunities, including new business models, exploration of new markets and winning of new market shares, and through reduced risks and operation costs. Specifically, we conclude that the FSSD aids more effective management of system boundaries and trade-offs, makes it possible to model and assess sustainable potentials for various materials and practices before investments are made, and offers the possibility for more effective collaboration across disciplines and sectors, regions, value-chains and stakeholder groups. We also conclude that the FSSD makes it possible to prevent damages, even from yet unknown problems, and not the least, to guide selection, development and combination of supplementary methods, tools, and other forms of support, which makes it possible to increase their utility for strategic sustainable development. Finally, we have shown that the FSSD is useful for structuring transdisciplinary academic education and research. Several examples of ongoing FSSD related research, as well as ideas for future work, are given. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Broman, Göran
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Robèrt, Karl-Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Basile, George
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Baumgartner, Rupert
    Collins, Terry
    Huisingh, Donald
    Systematic leadership towards sustainability2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systematic leadership towards sustainability implies utilization of systems thinking for step-wise approaches to transformative changes towards sustainable societies. This ‘call-for-papers’ (CfPs) for a Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production is focused upon what types of research are needed for us to make the necessary local, regional, national and global changes. This CfPs is for anyone who wishes to address these challenges seriously, that is, to utilize essential aspects of leadership to contribute strategically to the transition towards sustainable societies. To successfully address these challenges, people from different sectors and disciplines must work together in a coordinated and efficient way. We wish to explore the question: What support do such transformative endeavors require and how can science contribute?

  • 37.
    Burjorjee, Peter
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Roth, Benedikt
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Nelis, Yoeri
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Land cooperatives as a model for sustainable agriculture: A case study in Germany2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 38.
    Cai, Hantao
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Castro, Julian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Wepundi, Wafula
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Fostering social cohesion towards Smart Sustainable Cities: the role of Living Labs2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 39.
    Carey, Méabh
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Harned, Alexandrea
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Stein, Dayna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Addressing Food Waste as a Contribution to Strategic Sustainable Development within Vancouver, BC2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the production, distribution and sale of food negatively impacts ecological and social sustainability, undermining the vital systems on which society depends. Global implications are intensified as one-third of the world’s food is wasted. The purpose of this research is to understand the role of food waste mitigation as a strategic stepping stone to further sustainable development in food systems. A pragmatic qualitative approach and the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development were used to analyze this using a systems perspective to identify key focus areas for development. Analysis of the data collected from industry, municipal government and community stakeholders led to the identification of key causes of waste, and drivers of and barriers to food waste reduction. Causal loop diagrams aided in mapping the opportunities for collaboration and potential associated risks between the three aforementioned sectors. Thirteen focus areas were deduced and analyzed using sustainability principles. The interplay of upstream and downstream strategies is discussed in examining ways to pursue focus areas simultaneously to impact the systemic barriers to a sustainable food system including globalized trade, overproduction, and underlying issues of food insecurity. 

  • 40.
    Carlson, Raul
    et al.
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Erixon, Maria
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Pålsson, Ann-Christin
    Chalmers, SWE.
    Mattsson, Gunnar
    Ny, Henrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Hallberg, Klas
    Akzo Nobel, SWE.
    Person, Lisa
    Blanco, Louis
    Broberg, Robert
    Improving the specification of an operative LCI information system by co-oordinating the users' experiences in consensus forums2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Assessing Community Contributions to Sustainable Food Systems2020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence suggests that food and dietary adjustments at the community level can make positive contributions to globally sustainable food systems (SFS), which have reciprocal impacts on quality-of-life factors such as food security and nutritional health. Assessing such contributions has two central challenges: 1) a lack of methods that support alignment between communities and across scales, balanced against the need to involve the community in developing relevant indicators; and 2) the absence of adequate, fine grained data relevant to the community. Purpose: Addressing these two challenges, this paper builds on a local-to-global approach to engaging communities in SFS development and illustrates using a community case study with Canadian dietitians (a professional community). Methods: Researchers used the Delphi Inquiry method, guided by the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development, to address the first challenge, together with causal loop diagrams informed by the Cultural Adaptation Template to address the second. Results: Indicators were developed for dietitian-identified contributions to SFS. Modeling indicator interactions showed how some actions are reinforcing a professional paradigm, as well as priority areas for action and measurement. Conclusions: The methods used were a good fit for addressing the two central challenges guiding this work. Procedural guidelines are proposed that are adaptable to different community settings. Further, results highlighted that cultural paradigms are a driving force of change, dietitians have a strategic role in SFS development, and facilitating SFS literacy among RDs generates positive feedback loops that can amplify adaptations for, and positive contributions to, broader SFS development.

  • 42.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Conceptualizing and Assessing Sustainable Food Systems and Diets: A Review2020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To synthesize research conceptualizing and measuring sustainable food systems (SFS) and diets and discusses the results from the perspective of supporting community level participation in global SFS. Design: Researchers conducted a narrative review of the literature, structured results into emergent categories and themes, and analyzed against known challenges to community level measurement. Results: Concepts defining SFS fall into the following broad approaches: visionary, multidimensional, resilience and parametres. Within these, common categories and emergent themes are reported. Assessment of SFS and diets can be grouped into three general approaches: multidimensional progress reporting, composite scores, and vulnerability assessments. Assessment is challenged by data gaps, especially at the community level, making community engagement in broader global goals elusive. Conclusions: Results contribute to SFS theory by suggesting a need to further develop existing parametres concepts, which set out system limits and principled approaches to governing those systems and show promise for assessment in the absence of adequate data. Future research directions might explore parametres approaches for supporting community level contributions to SFS in a way that demonstrates local-to-global alignment. These will be relevant to practitioners in nutrition, public health and community development, who are well-positioned to facilitate such work.

  • 43.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Inviting Community into the Development of Globally Sustainable Food Systems2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems and human diets contribute to unsustainable socioecological conditions, which in turn negatively affect human health. These driver-impact relationships span multiple scales, prompting international governance bodies, nations, and communities alike to grapple with solutions for a better food future. Collaborative action across scales and sectors is necessary; however, how communities can align contributions with efforts at broader scales is unclear.

    The aim of this research is to develop theoretical and procedural supports for community engagement in globally sustainable food systems (SFS), and to provide concrete results relevant to one case community.

    The community of nutrition and dietetics professionals was chosen as the case community given its history of engagement with SFS, its integration throughout food system sectors, and because dietary shifts have significant potential to contribute to SFS. Furthermore, the researcher’s position as a member of this community supported the case study work.

    The research uses transdisciplinary methods guided by the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) and Community Development theory. The FSSD provides a concrete definition of sustainability and includes methodological supports for co-creation of sustainability transitions. Community Development theory supports participatory approaches and welcomes different knowledge cultures in such co-creation. The Delphi Inquiry method was used to facilitate data collection and community engagement. For measurement-specific elements of the research, causal loop diagrams (CLD) informed by the Cultural Adaptation Template (CAT) theory were used, and Critical Dietetics was used as a framework for dietetics-specific analysis.

    High level insights include that: (i) participatory and multidimensional approaches are important to facilitate community engagement in SFS development; (ii) objective parametres for defining sustainability are critical to guide concerted action and can provide an innovation space that invites creative and diverse solutions within; (iii) systems thinking and related tools help simplify the complexity of food systems without disregarding broader context, and support assessment in the absence of all data. Specifically in relation to the case community explored, insights include that, (i) integrating an SFS lens into existing roles and activities is important, because dietitians already work across sectors and scales, making them well positioned to contribute in diverse ways; (ii) a shared language based on transdisciplinary understandings of SFS is required; (iii) engaging in activities that facilitate SFS knowledge development within the profession, prior to integrating it into roles and activities, is an important first step; (iv) collaborative and reflexive approaches to continued knowledge development and practice are important, such that in the end sustainability becomes integrated into a cultural way of thinking about food.  

    Based on these insights, this dissertation outlines a procedure for collaborative community work for globally SFS. The procedure is adaptable to various community settings. The dissertation also provides specific guidance for how dietitians could utilise their strategic positions throughout food systems to contribute to SFS development.

  • 44.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Acadia University .
    Callaghan, Edith
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development. Acadia University.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    How Can Dietitians Leverage Change for Sustainable Food Systems in Canada2019In: Canadian journal of dietetic practice and research, ISSN 1486-3847, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In this paper, we begin to set out language defining sustainablefood systems (SFS) in Canada, through the voices of dietitians, andidentify leverage points where dietitians can affect change.Methods: Dietitians of Canada members were invited to a Delphi Inquiryprocess; questions explored a vision of SFS in Canada, barriers to thatvision, and actions. Results were independently analysed by 2 membersof the research team who used the Framework for Strategic SustainableDevelopment to structure the data.Results: Fifty-eight members participated. The resultant vision describesa future food system in 15 thematic areas of the social and ecologicalsystems. Barriers are described according to how they undermine sustainability.High-leverage actions areas included: (i) facilitating knowledgedevelopment within the profession and public, (ii) influencing organizationalpolicy to support SFS, and (iii) and influencing public policy.Approaches to such action included: (i) facilitating cross-sectoral collaborationand (ii) applying reflexive approaches.Conclusions: This research suggests a multidimensional understandingof food systems sustainability among dietitians. The vision provides somelanguage to describe what dietitians mean by SFS and can be used as acompass point to orient action. Action areas and approaches have thepotential to drive systemic change while avoiding unintendedconsequences.

  • 45.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Callaghan, Edith
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Morley, Adrian
    Manchester Metropolitan University, GBR.
    Broman, Göran
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Food system sustainability across scales: A proposed local-to-global approach to community planning and assessment2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in food systems sustainability is growing, but progress toward them is slow. This research focuses on three interrelated challenges that hinder progress. First, prevailing visions lack a concrete definition of sustainability. Second, global level conceptions fail to guide responses at the local level. Third, these deficiencies may lead to conflicting initiatives for addressing sustainable food systems at the community level that slow collective progress. The purpose of this article is to (1) describe the development of a framework for assessing food system sustainability which accommodates local-level measurement in the context of broader national and global scale measures; and (2) to propose a process that supports community determinacy over localized progress toward sustainable food systems. Using a modified Delphi Inquiry process, we engaged a diverse, global panel of experts in describing "success" with respect to sustainable food systems, today's reality, and identifying key indicators for tracking progress towards success. They were asked to consider scale during the process in order to explore locally relevant themes. Data were analyzed using the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) to facilitate a comprehensive and systematic exploration of key themes and indicators. Key results include a framework of indicator themes that are anchored in a concrete definition of sustainability, stable at national and global scales while remaining flexible at the local scale to accommodate contextual needs. We also propose a process for facilitating community-level planning for food system sustainability that utilizes this indicator framework. The proposed process is based on insights from the research results, as well as from previous research and experience applying the FSSD at a community level; it bears promise for future work to support communities to determine their own pathways, while contributing to a more coordinated whole. © 2017 by the author.

  • 46.
    Carlsson, Liesel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Williams, Patricia L.
    Hayes-Conroy, Jessica S.
    Hobart & William Smith Coll, Womens Studies, Geneva, NY 14456 USA..
    Lordly, Daphne
    Mt St Vincent Univ, Dept Appl Human Nutr, Halifax, NS, Canada..
    Callaghan, Edith
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    School Gardens: Cultivating Food Security in Nova Scotia Public Schools?2016In: Canadian journal of dietetic practice and research, ISSN 1486-3847, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A small but growing body of peer-reviewed research suggests that school gardens can play a role in building community food security (CFS); however, to date little research exploring the role of school gardens in supporting CFS is available. This paper begins to address this gap in the literature. Methods: A qualitative, exploratory, single-case study design was used. The focus of this case study was the school food garden at an elementary school in the River Valley, Nova Scotia, school community. Results: Results provide useful information about potential CFS effects of school gardens in addition to the environmental effects on school gardens important to their effectiveness as CFS tools. Findings suggest children gained food-related knowledge, skills, and values that support long-term CFS. A local social and political landscape at the community, provincial, and school board level were key to strengthening this garden's contributions to CFS. Conclusions: We support Dietitians of Canada's nomination of school gardens as an indicator of CFS with theoretical and practical evidence, underscore the importance of a supportive environment, and need for further research in this area. Health professionals and community organizations provide critical support, helping to weave gardens into a greater movement towards building CFS.

  • 47.
    Chender, Isabel
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Viggiani, Raquel Luna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Patarroyo, Zulma
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Role of Rural Development Interventions in Creating a Sustainable Society2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The inter-related social and ecological facets of global sustainability imply that the way society develops will impact the environment. Development presents complex, multifaceted challenges. Interventions in the developing world in the form of projects created by the agencies, organizations and agents of the international development community increasingly appreciate and seek to address these challenges. Yet, to do so effectively, interventions need to shift from fragmented, sector-specific approaches based on formal data reports to approaches that anticipate, adapt, transform, and learn. This research aims to complement and support the practical and theoretical knowledge of rural development agents with insights from practitioners using approaches that consider complexity in other fields, in order to explore how development interventions could play a role in moving society toward sustainability. A prototype guide for rural development interventions synthesizes results gathered from interviews with rural development agents within Latin America and learning experience designers into three levels: system, interaction, and personal. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) provides a systems perspective and unifying definition of sustainability. The interaction level presents key recommendations, rationale, and methods for action, and the personal level presents reflection questions. This research hopes to inspire mutual learning between development actors and communities.

  • 48.
    Chilik, Inna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Edens, Kim L.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Klusch, Kurt
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Ralph, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Assessment of Sustainability Maturity Models for Business Transformation2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Business organisations, given their size, influence, and global impact on finite planetary resources, are the key economic drivers contributing to unsustainable growth. Sustainability Maturity Models (SMMs) were developed as a tool to assist organisations to recognise and incorporate practices identified as pivotal to achieving business transformation. The Strategic Sustainable Development (SSD) approach was used to develop an analytical tool to assess the robustness of two of the aspects of SMMs, specifically structure and process. Interviews with model designers were also conducted. The research team identified key strengths limitations of SMMs.  

     

    The analysis revealed that SMMs have strength in starting the conversation with leadership and charting the way ahead for organizations by clearly defining the maturity level success criteria.

     

    These findings confirm the significant potential of SMMs infused by supporting process tools, to be a strong foundation for organisations on their sustainability journeys, aiding overall transformation of businesses. This in turn has the potential to shift the role of businesses in the larger socio-ecological system from being contributors to the sustainability challenge, to becoming active providers of solutions.

  • 49.
    Chita, Meera
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Kijtanasopa, Kulvarong
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    von Petersdorff-Campen, Sophia
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Stam, Lennart
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    The Purpose of Business: Where value meets Strategic Sustainable Development2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current global economic paradigm, centred on growth, is a significant barrier in the transition towards a sustainable society. Business-as-Usual companies operating within this paradigm are perceived to prosper at the expense of society and environment which is not viable on a finite planet. The need to rethink the purpose of business is inevitable as maximising shareholder value, has been deemed insufficient to create asustainable society.

    This study aimed to explore: how business models can be used to create value that supports Strategic Sustainable Development. Previous research proposed that the concept of Business Models for Sustainability helps business place sustainability at the core of all consideration. A qualitative research was chosen for which we employed the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development and combined a literature review with an investigation of three expert groups to answer our research question.

    Our findings showed that, compared to other value forms, system value is the most appropriate concept for businesses striving towards sustainable development. Based on our findings, six themes emerged that businesses need to address to accelerate the speed of change towards sustainability. To make a relevant contribution to the intended audience,a prototype has been developed based on our findings.

  • 50.
    Coley, Alex
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Jerkovich, Jordan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Pilgaard Madsen, Mikkel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Pursuing Sustainability and Prosperity in Swedish Municipalities: Using Indicators to Inform Strategic Governance2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Deciding between sustainability or prosperity may be a false choice when the phenomena are appropriately defined and considered together (Stiglitz et al. 2009). With reference to existing indicator systems and frameworks, including the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) and the Community Capitals Framework (CCF), this research developed three novel indices (SMSI, SMSI+, and CCFI) using a Strategic Sustainable Development (SSD) approach to measure and analyze the correlation between sustainability (SMSI, SMSI+) and prosperity (CCFI) in Swedish municipalities. The spearman rank-order coefficient values were 0.259 and 0.588 for SMSI and CFFI and SMSI+ and CCFI, respectively. Both were significantly correlated with a p-value of 0.05, where SMSI+ and CCFI were 0.329 more correlated than SMSI and CCFI. This showed that an index that more comprehensively considers an SSD approach correlates more with CCFI. Furthermore, only six out of 234 Swedish municipalities ranked in the top 10 percent of both SMSI+ and CCFI, showing that it is difficult to successfully pursue sustainability and prosperity together in practice. Importantly, this research also demonstrates that it is possible to create indices using an SSD approach while outlining the methods for how to do so

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