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  • 1.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Bertoni, Marco
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Assessing the Value of Sub-System Technologies including Life Cycle Alternatives - an aerospace investigation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging from an industrial case study in the aerospace industry, the paper proposes an approach to evaluate sub- system technology concepts from a life cycle perspective. The approach is composed by 5 main phases that aims to drive product designers towards more value-oriented design decisions. It is shown how different life cycle alternatives, such as the selling of a Product-Service-System instead of a traditional product, deeply impact the value of design alternatives. The described approach has been developed in collaboration with industrial partners and represents a potential instrument to enhance value-driven product design.

  • 2. Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Bordegoni, Monica
    Johansson, Christian
    Luleå Technical University.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå Technical University.
    Pilot specifications definition guidelines for the implementation of a KEE solution in the aeronautical domain2008In: CIRP Design Conference 2008 / [ed] Fred J. A. M. van Houten, Laboratory of Design, Production and Management, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Univ. of Twente , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing and implementing a Knowledge Management System (KMS) in a Virtual Enterprise is a labour intensive and risky task. Solution prototypes (Pilots) are usually built to verify system effectiveness prior to final implementation. The paper proposes a methodology to guide this Pilot specifications definition process. These guidelines support engineers and knowledge experts in collaboratively defining functionalities, services, software components and performance indicators of the prototype. The methodology has been conceived and applied within the European project VIVACE, to support the development of a Knowledge Enabled Engineering (KEE) system in the aeronautical domain.

  • 3.
    Jeppsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Sjöberg, Jessica
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Establishing a cost model when estimating product cost in early design phases2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    About 75% of the total product cost is determined in the early design phase, which means that the possibilities to affect costs are relatively small when the design phase is completed. For companies, it is therefore vital to conduct reliable cost estimates in the early design phase, when selecting between different design choices. When conducting a cost estimate there are many uncertainties. The aim with this study is therefore to explore how uncertainties regarding product cost can be considered when estimating product cost and how expert’s knowledge can be integrated within cost estimation. A case study has been conducted within the aerospace industry at the company GKN Aerospace Sweden (GAS) in Trollhättan, from which a model to estimate product cost has been developed. The model is developed for space turbines, but can with modifications be used for other products. Space turbines are highly advanced products, produced in small batches with complex manufacturing processes and high costs. Because of the heavy capital investment, long lead times and high risks, cost estimates become very important, which made GAS suitable for the case study.

    The new cost estimation model (NCEM) developed is a combination between intuitive, analogical and analytical cost estimation techniques. Product cost at GAS is built up by the following cost elements; raw material, purchased parts, material surcharge, manufacturing cost, manufacturing surcharge, outsourced operations, method support, delivery cost, warranty and scrap, which are studied more in depth. The material cost is estimated based on historical data and a list of previous purchased alloys is created. The manufacturing cost is determined more in detail where the cost for each operation is estimated, based on operation time, amount of removed material or welding speed. The method support cost is estimated based on a study of an internal prognosis where the amount of time from each discipline needed to support the product is determined. Included in the NCEM is also a risk assessment.

    The main insights from this study is that transparency is vital when estimating product cost. It is important to state what assumptions that have been made. Breaking down the product cost into smaller units and create awareness about the cost drivers will identify risks and reduce uncertainness. Experts possess a great deal of knowledge about cost drivers and should be integrated when estimating product cost. 

  • 4. Ola, Isaksson
    et al.
    Bertoni, Alessandro
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Levandowski, Christoffer
    Muller, Jakob
    Wiklund, Daniel
    Johansson, Peter
    VIRTUAL CONTEXTUAL VALIDATION OF TECHNOLOGIES AND METHODS FOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Sandberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Boart, Patrik
    Larsson, Tobias
    Polhem Laboratory, Luleå University of Technology.
    Functional product life-cycle simulation model for cost estimation in conceptual design of jet engine components2005In: Concurrent Engineering - Research and Applications, ISSN 1063-293X, E-ISSN 1531-2003, ISSN 1531-2003, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 331-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As functional (total care) products emerge in the jet engine industry, the need for product life-cycle models capable of definition and evaluation of life cycle properties increases, since functional products (FP) includes both hardware and service. Recent life-cycle models are intended for hardware products and mostly handle design and manufacturing knowledge. The aim of this article is to present a design approach that extends the evaluation capabilities beyond classical hardware design and manufacturing evaluation. The focus has been to introduce evaluation of manufacturing and post-manufacturing activities in evaluation of conceptual designs. For this purpose, a model has been proposed to handle the information flow between teams when developing structural jet engine components. A case study, in which the proposed model was used in cooperation with a jet engine component manufacturer, is presented. Aspects concerning design, manufacturing, performance, and maintenance of jet engine flanges were included in the example by means of a knowledge based engineering (KBE)-system coupled to databases and spreadsheets. The model is more suitable than recent work for the development of hardware parts of functional products (HFP), since knowledge from more product development disciplines is included. As the engineer changes the design and directly assesses the life-cycle cost (LCC) and how the changes impact the interface to other jet engine components, more knowledge on the impact of design decisions is available at hand for the engineering designer than without the model

  • 6. Sandberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Kokkolaras, Michael
    Aidanpää, Jan-Olov
    Isaksson, Ola
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology.
    A master-model approach to whole jet engine analysis and design optimization2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel jet engine concepts and architectures are being explored to reduce mass, fuel consumption, development cost and environmental impact while increasing performance. Although the engine systems development process of the next generation aero engines takes place at the original equipment manufacturer level, component manufacturers need to optimize their components using an integrated engine system design approach. Therefore, they need the capability to model and simulate whole engine behavior. While modeling and simulation are traditional strengths of the aerospace industry, model integration of the whole engine system and its components, as well as between separate disciplines, is still a relatively weak link. This paper presents a master-model approach that facilitates integrated analysis used in design optimization. The master-model approach promotes the existence of a single governing version of the product definition, including associated versions of loads, materials, interfaces, constraints etc. A simple yet illustrative industry application is presented where dynamics and displacement analysis are performed using the master model and a parameter study is performed to find an optimal design. The presented scenario investigates the impact of changing the bearing position of the turbine rear frame of a turbo-fan engine considering the load case of a “fan blade off” event.

  • 7. Sandberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Tyapin, Ilya
    Kokkolaras, Michael
    Isaksson, Ola
    Aidanpää, Jan-Olov
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    A knowledge-based master-model approach with application to rotating machinery design2011In: Concurrent Engineering - Research and Applications, ISSN 1063-293X, E-ISSN 1531-2003, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel rotating machinery design concepts and architectures are being explored to reduce mass, energy consumption, manufacturing costs, and environmental impact while increasing performance. As component manufacturers supply parts to original equipment manufacturers, it is desirable to design the components using a systems approach so that they are optimized for system-level performance. To accomplish that, suppliers must be able to model and predict the behavior of the whole machinery. Traditional computer-aided design/computer-aided engineering master-modeling approaches enable manual changes to be propagated to linked models. Novel knowledge-based master-modeling approaches enable automated coordination of multidisciplinary analyses. In this article, we present a specific implementation of such a knowledge-based master-modeling approach that facilitates multidisciplinary design optimization of rotating machinery. The master-model (MM) approach promotes the existence of a single governing version of the product definition as well as operating scenarios. Rules, scripts, and macros link the MM to domain-specific models. A simple yet illustrative industry application is presented, where rotor-dynamics and displacement analyses are performed to evaluate relocation alternatives for the rear bearing position of a rotating machinery under a ‘fan-blade-off’ load case.

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