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  • 1.
    Niva, Bernt
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Omvårdnad.
    A pilot study of the activity patterns of five elderly persons after a housing adaptation2006In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 21-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of an accessible home environment for occupational performance has been emphasized in occupational therapy, but knowledge about how accessibility can affect a person's activity patterns is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the activity patterns of five elderly persons aged between 70 and 84 years and their views about accessibility and usability of their homes before and after a housing adaptation. Two different questionnaires, 'Accessibility in My Home' and the 'Occupational Questionnaire' were used for data collection. Adaptations in the home included: removing thresholds, installing new taps in the bathroom and kitchen and broadening doorways. After the adaptations the five participants reported that they increased their outside activities, reduced naps during the day and slept better at night. The results showed that the participants performed more and new activities when their home environment had become accessible. Activities performed were also perceived as more important after the housing adaptation. There is a need to replicate the study with a larger sample. Further research is needed on the impact of home adaptations on the activity patterns of elderly people.

  • 2.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona.
    Are Playgrounds a Case of Occupational Injustice?: Experiences of Parents of Children with Disabilities2016In: Children, Youth and Environments, ISSN 1546-2250, E-ISSN 1546-2250, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 28-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational injustice refers to a setting or situations that can restrict a person in performing an occupation. Because a playground is a setting that can restrict children with disabilities from the occupation of playing, this paper frames playground accessibility in terms of occupational justice. This study interviewed 18 parents of children with disabilities about their children's experiences with playgrounds. Examining playgrounds from an occupational justice perspective can be a means to advocate for accessible playgrounds as a first step towards helping children with disabilities participate in play activities in this environment.

  • 3.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Omvårdnad.
    How children with restricted mobility perceive the accessibility and usability of their home environment2006In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 193-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe how children with restricted mobility perceive accessibility and usability of their home environment. The investigation was carried through a descriptive questionnaire, mailed to children in northern Sweden with the diagnoses of cerebral palsy, spina bifida and muscular diseases. Eighty-two children completed the questionnaire. The results showed that the children perceived the accessibility of the physical environment in their homes as relatively good while outside the home the environment was less accessible. In the social environment, frequency of peer contacts varied. The present study underscores the challenges of ensuring that children with restricted mobility living in the parental home are able to have an accessible and usable environment in order to perform activities. Limitations of this study included the questionnaire design. Further research should be carried out with children with restricted mobility to obtain a better understanding of how to improve their mobility in their home environment

  • 4.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Omvårdnad.
    Usability of playgrounds for children with different abilities2007In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to better understand how children with different abilities use playgrounds to engage in creative play and interact socially with their peers. Twenty children aged between 7 and 12 years, with different abilities, participated in interviews. The findings showed that playgrounds served as a reference point for all the children, they challenged a child's physical abilities and provided opportunities for role-playing and social interactions. However, for children with disabilities, playgrounds had limited accessibility, usability and did not support interaction with peers. A methodological limitation of the study was that the interviewer only met the children once. Further research should be carried out to investigate if creating playgrounds according to universal design principles and adapting them to the needs of children with disabilities would improve social interactions and provide more opportunities for play.

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